Tag Archives: after

This is what the blood donor service does after an attack – and how you can help | Jane Green

I was overwhelmed by how generously the people of Manchester responded to this horrific attack. Both our blood donor centres in Manchester had queues outside the doors before they even opened. Our national call centre was taking about 1,000 calls an hour by 10am, from people who wanted to help save lives by donating blood.

The response was driven by well-intentioned social media posts from the public. The desire to help was incredible. However we already had enough blood to supply the hospitals treating the victims, and we did not appeal for extra donors. We plan ahead to build in reserves to deal with major incidents. We hope that people who want to help will now become regular donors, because that is how they can best help us save lives when there is a tragedy.

Many people wanted to donate to help that day, but when you donate blood, it is not taken straight to a patient. We need time to test it and process it. The different components such as platelets and red blood cells need to be separated out. Typically, your blood donation will only reach a patient two or three weeks after you donate. The blood used to treat the Manchester victims would have been donated several weeks earlier, and those donors would have been from across the country.

Hospitals order blood from us in advance, without the need for blood to be brought in for each patient. We supply hospitals through our regional stock-holding units (what people refer to as “blood banks”) mainly through routine deliveries. Over Monday night we made 21 deliveries of blood to hospitals in Manchester, including 15 “blue light” emergency deliveries, delivering 346 units of red blood cells. We were able to meet all the hospitals’ requests, and our stocks remained good. We don’t know exactly how this blood was used, and much of the blood from the routine deliveries would have gone to patients not affected by the attack. But this was an exceptionally high level of local emergency demand and many of those precious donations would have been transfused into attack victims.

Trauma patients require more than just red blood cells. They also need platelets to help their blood clot, and other more specialised products: O-negative blood is especially important in emergencies because it can be given to anyone when time is short and you don’t have time to test for blood groups. We always need new O-negative donors because their blood is so valuable.

As Tuesday morning progressed, people began queueing to donate. Some had friends or family members caught up in the incident. We were worried they might be confused or upset about why there was no capacity or urgent need for them to donate that day.


We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, because we need more black and Asian donors

We tried to spread the message about how people could best help across social media and through the press. I was working at Plymouth Grove donor centre, next to Manchester Royal Infirmary, where many victims were being treated, and I spoke to many people face to face. We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, which was moving and very important – because we need more black and Asian donors. Patients benefit from closely matched blood, which will often come from donors of the same ethnicity.

Our message is that blood can best save lives in a tragedy when our stocks are already good through regular donations. Thanks to our loyal army of nearly 900,000 active donors, many of whom give blood three or four times a year, we can do that. But every year many of these donors have to drop out because of age, ill health and many other reasons. We need nearly 200,000 people to register as new donors every year.

If people have been inspired to donate for the first time, please go online, make an appointment, and donate. Blood saves lives, and your donation will help other people in urgent need, and make sure we are again ready for any major incident.

This is what the blood donor service does after an attack – and how you can help | Jane Green

I was overwhelmed by how generously the people of Manchester responded to this horrific attack. Both our blood donor centres in Manchester had queues outside the doors before they even opened. Our national call centre was taking about 1,000 calls an hour by 10am, from people who wanted to help save lives by donating blood.

The response was driven by well-intentioned social media posts from the public. The desire to help was incredible. However we already had enough blood to supply the hospitals treating the victims, and we did not appeal for extra donors. We plan ahead to build in reserves to deal with major incidents. We hope that people who want to help will now become regular donors, because that is how they can best help us save lives when there is a tragedy.

Many people wanted to donate to help that day, but when you donate blood, it is not taken straight to a patient. We need time to test it and process it. The different components such as platelets and red blood cells need to be separated out. Typically, your blood donation will only reach a patient two or three weeks after you donate. The blood used to treat the Manchester victims would have been donated several weeks earlier, and those donors would have been from across the country.

Hospitals order blood from us in advance, without the need for blood to be brought in for each patient. We supply hospitals through our regional stock-holding units (what people refer to as “blood banks”) mainly through routine deliveries. Over Monday night we made 21 deliveries of blood to hospitals in Manchester, including 15 “blue light” emergency deliveries, delivering 346 units of red blood cells. We were able to meet all the hospitals’ requests, and our stocks remained good. We don’t know exactly how this blood was used, and much of the blood from the routine deliveries would have gone to patients not affected by the attack. But this was an exceptionally high level of local emergency demand and many of those precious donations would have been transfused into attack victims.

Trauma patients require more than just red blood cells. They also need platelets to help their blood clot, and other more specialised products: O-negative blood is especially important in emergencies because it can be given to anyone when time is short and you don’t have time to test for blood groups. We always need new O-negative donors because their blood is so valuable.

As Tuesday morning progressed, people began queueing to donate. Some had friends or family members caught up in the incident. We were worried they might be confused or upset about why there was no capacity or urgent need for them to donate that day.


We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, because we need more black and Asian donors

We tried to spread the message about how people could best help across social media and through the press. I was working at Plymouth Grove donor centre, next to Manchester Royal Infirmary, where many victims were being treated, and I spoke to many people face to face. We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, which was moving and very important – because we need more black and Asian donors. Patients benefit from closely matched blood, which will often come from donors of the same ethnicity.

Our message is that blood can best save lives in a tragedy when our stocks are already good through regular donations. Thanks to our loyal army of nearly 900,000 active donors, many of whom give blood three or four times a year, we can do that. But every year many of these donors have to drop out because of age, ill health and many other reasons. We need nearly 200,000 people to register as new donors every year.

If people have been inspired to donate for the first time, please go online, make an appointment, and donate. Blood saves lives, and your donation will help other people in urgent need, and make sure we are again ready for any major incident.

This is what the blood donor service does after an attack – and how you can help | Jane Green

I was overwhelmed by how generously the people of Manchester responded to this horrific attack. Both our blood donor centres in Manchester had queues outside the doors before they even opened. Our national call centre was taking about 1,000 calls an hour by 10am, from people who wanted to help save lives by donating blood.

The response was driven by well-intentioned social media posts from the public. The desire to help was incredible. However we already had enough blood to supply the hospitals treating the victims, and we did not appeal for extra donors. We plan ahead to build in reserves to deal with major incidents. We hope that people who want to help will now become regular donors, because that is how they can best help us save lives when there is a tragedy.

Many people wanted to donate to help that day, but when you donate blood, it is not taken straight to a patient. We need time to test it and process it. The different components such as platelets and red blood cells need to be separated out. Typically, your blood donation will only reach a patient two or three weeks after you donate. The blood used to treat the Manchester victims would have been donated several weeks earlier, and those donors would have been from across the country.

Hospitals order blood from us in advance, without the need for blood to be brought in for each patient. We supply hospitals through our regional stock-holding units (what people refer to as “blood banks”) mainly through routine deliveries. Over Monday night we made 21 deliveries of blood to hospitals in Manchester, including 15 “blue light” emergency deliveries, delivering 346 units of red blood cells. We were able to meet all the hospitals’ requests, and our stocks remained good. We don’t know exactly how this blood was used, and much of the blood from the routine deliveries would have gone to patients not affected by the attack. But this was an exceptionally high level of local emergency demand and many of those precious donations would have been transfused into attack victims.

Trauma patients require more than just red blood cells. They also need platelets to help their blood clot, and other more specialised products: O-negative blood is especially important in emergencies because it can be given to anyone when time is short and you don’t have time to test for blood groups. We always need new O-negative donors because their blood is so valuable.

As Tuesday morning progressed, people began queueing to donate. Some had friends or family members caught up in the incident. We were worried they might be confused or upset about why there was no capacity or urgent need for them to donate that day.


We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, because we need more black and Asian donors

We tried to spread the message about how people could best help across social media and through the press. I was working at Plymouth Grove donor centre, next to Manchester Royal Infirmary, where many victims were being treated, and I spoke to many people face to face. We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, which was moving and very important – because we need more black and Asian donors. Patients benefit from closely matched blood, which will often come from donors of the same ethnicity.

Our message is that blood can best save lives in a tragedy when our stocks are already good through regular donations. Thanks to our loyal army of nearly 900,000 active donors, many of whom give blood three or four times a year, we can do that. But every year many of these donors have to drop out because of age, ill health and many other reasons. We need nearly 200,000 people to register as new donors every year.

If people have been inspired to donate for the first time, please go online, make an appointment, and donate. Blood saves lives, and your donation will help other people in urgent need, and make sure we are again ready for any major incident.

This is what the blood donor service does after an attack – and how you can help | Jane Green

I was overwhelmed by how generously the people of Manchester responded to this horrific attack. Both our blood donor centres in Manchester had queues outside the doors before they even opened. Our national call centre was taking about 1,000 calls an hour by 10am, from people who wanted to help save lives by donating blood.

The response was driven by well-intentioned social media posts from the public. The desire to help was incredible. However we already had enough blood to supply the hospitals treating the victims, and we did not appeal for extra donors. We plan ahead to build in reserves to deal with major incidents. We hope that people who want to help will now become regular donors, because that is how they can best help us save lives when there is a tragedy.

Many people wanted to donate to help that day, but when you donate blood, it is not taken straight to a patient. We need time to test it and process it. The different components such as platelets and red blood cells need to be separated out. Typically, your blood donation will only reach a patient two or three weeks after you donate. The blood used to treat the Manchester victims would have been donated several weeks earlier, and those donors would have been from across the country.

Hospitals order blood from us in advance, without the need for blood to be brought in for each patient. We supply hospitals through our regional stock-holding units (what people refer to as “blood banks”) mainly through routine deliveries. Over Monday night we made 21 deliveries of blood to hospitals in Manchester, including 15 “blue light” emergency deliveries, delivering 346 units of red blood cells. We were able to meet all the hospitals’ requests, and our stocks remained good. We don’t know exactly how this blood was used, and much of the blood from the routine deliveries would have gone to patients not affected by the attack. But this was an exceptionally high level of local emergency demand and many of those precious donations would have been transfused into attack victims.

Trauma patients require more than just red blood cells. They also need platelets to help their blood clot, and other more specialised products: O-negative blood is especially important in emergencies because it can be given to anyone when time is short and you don’t have time to test for blood groups. We always need new O-negative donors because their blood is so valuable.

As Tuesday morning progressed, people began queueing to donate. Some had friends or family members caught up in the incident. We were worried they might be confused or upset about why there was no capacity or urgent need for them to donate that day.


We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, because we need more black and Asian donors

We tried to spread the message about how people could best help across social media and through the press. I was working at Plymouth Grove donor centre, next to Manchester Royal Infirmary, where many victims were being treated, and I spoke to many people face to face. We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, which was moving and very important – because we need more black and Asian donors. Patients benefit from closely matched blood, which will often come from donors of the same ethnicity.

Our message is that blood can best save lives in a tragedy when our stocks are already good through regular donations. Thanks to our loyal army of nearly 900,000 active donors, many of whom give blood three or four times a year, we can do that. But every year many of these donors have to drop out because of age, ill health and many other reasons. We need nearly 200,000 people to register as new donors every year.

If people have been inspired to donate for the first time, please go online, make an appointment, and donate. Blood saves lives, and your donation will help other people in urgent need, and make sure we are again ready for any major incident.

This is what the blood donor service does after an attack – and how you can help | Jane Green

I was overwhelmed by how generously the people of Manchester responded to this horrific attack. Both our blood donor centres in Manchester had queues outside the doors before they even opened. Our national call centre was taking about 1,000 calls an hour by 10am, from people who wanted to help save lives by donating blood.

The response was driven by well-intentioned social media posts from the public. The desire to help was incredible. However we already had enough blood to supply the hospitals treating the victims, and we did not appeal for extra donors. We plan ahead to build in reserves to deal with major incidents. We hope that people who want to help will now become regular donors, because that is how they can best help us save lives when there is a tragedy.

Many people wanted to donate to help that day, but when you donate blood, it is not taken straight to a patient. We need time to test it and process it. The different components such as platelets and red blood cells need to be separated out. Typically, your blood donation will only reach a patient two or three weeks after you donate. The blood used to treat the Manchester victims would have been donated several weeks earlier, and those donors would have been from across the country.

Hospitals order blood from us in advance, without the need for blood to be brought in for each patient. We supply hospitals through our regional stock-holding units (what people refer to as “blood banks”) mainly through routine deliveries. Over Monday night we made 21 deliveries of blood to hospitals in Manchester, including 15 “blue light” emergency deliveries, delivering 346 units of red blood cells. We were able to meet all the hospitals’ requests, and our stocks remained good. We don’t know exactly how this blood was used, and much of the blood from the routine deliveries would have gone to patients not affected by the attack. But this was an exceptionally high level of local emergency demand and many of those precious donations would have been transfused into attack victims.

Trauma patients require more than just red blood cells. They also need platelets to help their blood clot, and other more specialised products: O-negative blood is especially important in emergencies because it can be given to anyone when time is short and you don’t have time to test for blood groups. We always need new O-negative donors because their blood is so valuable.

As Tuesday morning progressed, people began queueing to donate. Some had friends or family members caught up in the incident. We were worried they might be confused or upset about why there was no capacity or urgent need for them to donate that day.


We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, because we need more black and Asian donors

We tried to spread the message about how people could best help across social media and through the press. I was working at Plymouth Grove donor centre, next to Manchester Royal Infirmary, where many victims were being treated, and I spoke to many people face to face. We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, which was moving and very important – because we need more black and Asian donors. Patients benefit from closely matched blood, which will often come from donors of the same ethnicity.

Our message is that blood can best save lives in a tragedy when our stocks are already good through regular donations. Thanks to our loyal army of nearly 900,000 active donors, many of whom give blood three or four times a year, we can do that. But every year many of these donors have to drop out because of age, ill health and many other reasons. We need nearly 200,000 people to register as new donors every year.

If people have been inspired to donate for the first time, please go online, make an appointment, and donate. Blood saves lives, and your donation will help other people in urgent need, and make sure we are again ready for any major incident.

This is what the blood donor service does after an attack – and how you can help | Jane Green

I was overwhelmed by how generously the people of Manchester responded to this horrific attack. Both our blood donor centres in Manchester had queues outside the doors before they even opened. Our national call centre was taking about 1,000 calls an hour by 10am, from people who wanted to help save lives by donating blood.

The response was driven by well-intentioned social media posts from the public. The desire to help was incredible. However we already had enough blood to supply the hospitals treating the victims, and we did not appeal for extra donors. We plan ahead to build in reserves to deal with major incidents. We hope that people who want to help will now become regular donors, because that is how they can best help us save lives when there is a tragedy.

Many people wanted to donate to help that day, but when you donate blood, it is not taken straight to a patient. We need time to test it and process it. The different components such as platelets and red blood cells need to be separated out. Typically, your blood donation will only reach a patient two or three weeks after you donate. The blood used to treat the Manchester victims would have been donated several weeks earlier, and those donors would have been from across the country.

Hospitals order blood from us in advance, without the need for blood to be brought in for each patient. We supply hospitals through our regional stock-holding units (what people refer to as “blood banks”) mainly through routine deliveries. Over Monday night we made 21 deliveries of blood to hospitals in Manchester, including 15 “blue light” emergency deliveries, delivering 346 units of red blood cells. We were able to meet all the hospitals’ requests, and our stocks remained good. We don’t know exactly how this blood was used, and much of the blood from the routine deliveries would have gone to patients not affected by the attack. But this was an exceptionally high level of local emergency demand and many of those precious donations would have been transfused into attack victims.

Trauma patients require more than just red blood cells. They also need platelets to help their blood clot, and other more specialised products: O-negative blood is especially important in emergencies because it can be given to anyone when time is short and you don’t have time to test for blood groups. We always need new O-negative donors because their blood is so valuable.

As Tuesday morning progressed, people began queueing to donate. Some had friends or family members caught up in the incident. We were worried they might be confused or upset about why there was no capacity or urgent need for them to donate that day.


We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, because we need more black and Asian donors

We tried to spread the message about how people could best help across social media and through the press. I was working at Plymouth Grove donor centre, next to Manchester Royal Infirmary, where many victims were being treated, and I spoke to many people face to face. We were inspired to see the diversity of people coming forward, which was moving and very important – because we need more black and Asian donors. Patients benefit from closely matched blood, which will often come from donors of the same ethnicity.

Our message is that blood can best save lives in a tragedy when our stocks are already good through regular donations. Thanks to our loyal army of nearly 900,000 active donors, many of whom give blood three or four times a year, we can do that. But every year many of these donors have to drop out because of age, ill health and many other reasons. We need nearly 200,000 people to register as new donors every year.

If people have been inspired to donate for the first time, please go online, make an appointment, and donate. Blood saves lives, and your donation will help other people in urgent need, and make sure we are again ready for any major incident.

WHO elects first ever African director-general after tense vote

The World Health Organisation has its first ever director-general from Africa, after the election of Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the former Ethiopian health minister.

Dr Tedros, as he is known, beat the British candidate, Dr David Nabarro, after three tense rounds of voting on Tuesday. Third was Pakistan’s Dr Sania Nishtar. The decision by member states came at the World Health Assembly in Geneva after a fraught campaign.

Dr Tedros was well-regarded, particularly by aid donors, for his stewardship of health in the Ethiopian government from 2005 to 2012. In the latter stages of the campaign, however, there were allegations about the human rights record and lack of transparency of the government of which he was a member. One US academic accused him of trying to hide a cholera epidemic that occurred in Ethiopia on his watch.

Dr Nabarro’s pitch for power rested on his long career at the UN, where he has played a trouble-shooting role in a number of epidemics. He promised reform of the WHO, which was strongly criticised around the world for failing to respond quickly enough to the Ebola epidemic in west Africa. Nabarro was sent in to boost the response by the UN Secretary General, then Ban Ki-moon. Later he chaired the advisory committee set up by the outgoing WHO Director General Margaret Chan, which put in place a blueprint for reform.

The campaign to lead the WHO has been long and hard fought. It began with the nominations of six candidates in September last year. The first one to fall by the wayside in January, when the WHO’s executive board selected the finalists, was the Hungarian former health minister Dr Miklós Szócska, followed swiftly by Italy’s Dr Flavia Bustreo and France’s Professor Philippe Douste-Blazy.

The candidates crisscrossed the world, seeking to win the votes of member states. For the first time, they debated together on public platforms and set out their manifesto commitments in online videos. But in spite of the greater transparency, there were allegations of dirty tricks behind the scenes.

The stakes were particularly high in the wake of the scandal that engulfed the WHO during the Ebola epidemic in west Africa. Investigations revealed that officials in the Africa regional office and also in the Geneva headquarters had not wanted to upset the governments of the three affected countries, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea by declaring an epidemic. There were calls from some for the abolition of the WHO and the creation of a more effective body.

The new director-general will have not only the reform agenda but also a struggle for more financial stability to contend with. Member states have been reluctant to give the UN organisation core funding and much of its income has been tied to specific projects, giving it less flexibility.

Dr Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, said: “I’m pleased to extend my congratulations to Dr Tedros on his appointment to the most important job in global health. As someone who has worked tirelessly to reform health systems in Ethiopia and across Africa, he will bring great insight and the political leadership necessary to restore trust in the WHO at a critical moment in its history.

“Tedros’s predecessor has done much to improve the WHO’s response to epidemics in the wake of the Ebola crisis of 2014/15, but there is more to be done. Tedros has the power to herald a new era in how the world prepares for and responds to epidemics, including building partnerships, strengthening public health systems, and developing new vaccines and therapies that are available to all who need them.”

NHS cyber-attack causing disruption one week after breach

NHS trusts are experiencing disruption one week after a cyber-attack caused havoc in more than 150 countries.

The unprecedented ransomware breach froze computers across the health service last Friday and threatened to delete files unless a ransom was paid.

Operations and clinic appointments were cancelled and patients were still being diverted from accident and emergency departments on Thursday.

However, NHS England confirmed on Friday that ambulances were no longer being diverted to unaffected hospitals.

Dr Anne Rainsberry, regional director for London at NHS England, said: “There is still some disruption in a small number of areas but most patients are being treated normally. We are grateful for the hard work of staff at trusts and GP practices who are still suffering IT issues but have found ways to work around this, as well as the patience of people who have been affected.”

A pre-inquest review on Friday into hearings on the deaths of the perpetrator and the victims of the Westminster terrorist attack in March heard Barts Health NHS trust, the health service’s largest trust, was still unable to access data.

Lawyers representing the trust, which treated a victim, Andreea Cristea, told the hearing it was unable to access witness statements because of ongoing IT disruption. The trust would provide the statements once the disruption had eased.

The ransomware, WannaCry, also hit large organisations such as Telefónica, Deutsche Bahn and FedEx as it rapidly spread around the globe.

French researchers have found a way to decrypt Windows computers infected with WannaCry without having to pay the cyber criminals.

Their tools, wannakey and wanakiwi, are able to recover the key used to encrypt the files if it is still in the computer’s memory. It can then be used to restore the encrypted files on infected computers.

But the security researchers warned that the tools would only work if the computer had not been rebooted. Wannakey works for Windows XP and, as Adrien Guinet, a security expert and developer of the tool, said: “You need some luck for this to work, and so it might not work in every case.”

Wanakiwi, developed by Benjamin Delpy – who worked on it during in his spare time outside his day job at the Banque de France – has been shown to work on Windows XP and Windows 7, as well as Windows server 2003, and will probably work on Windows Vista and other variants of Windows affected by WannaCry, according to Delpy.

Matthieu Suiche, an internationally renowned hacker who collaborated with Guinet and Delpy, said: “This method relies on finding prime numbers in memory if the memory hasn’t be reused. This means that after a certain period of time memory may get reused and those prime numbers may be erased. Also, this means the infected machine should not have been rebooted.”

The tools, verified by several independent security researchers, are described as a last-chance way for technicians to save files that are scheduled to be lost for ever, as the deadline for paying the ransom looms for those computers infected a week ago.

Suiche said: “Today [19 May] marks the seventh infection day [started on the 12th] — which means that many users would potentially lose their files forever from today as stated in the initial infection window. The clock is currently ticking for many users around the world.”

US teenager dies after succession of caffeine drinks in two hours

A teenager in the US died because he consumed too many high-caffeine drinks in a short space of time, a coroner has said.

Davis Allen Cripe died last month, about an hour after collapsing in his high school near Columbia, South Carolina. The 16-year-old had consumed a latte from McDonald’s, a large Mountain Dew drink and a highly caffeinated energy drink in just under two hours, Richland county coroner Gary Watts said.

Doctors said Davis died from a “caffeine-induced cardiac event causing a probable arrhythmia”, according to Watts.

He added that the teenager was considered healthy and the autopsy showed no sign of an existing undiagnosed heart condition.

“This is not a caffeine overdose,” said Watts. “We’re not saying that it was the total amount of caffeine in the system, it was just the way that it was ingested over that short period of time.”

Davis weighed about 90kg but would not have been considered morbidly obese, according to Watts, who added that he would have been unharmed by the same amount of caffeine on another day.

“We’re not trying to speak out totally against caffeine,” said Watts. “We believe people need to pay attention to their caffeine intake and how they do it, just as they do with alcohol or cigarettes.”

The particular energy drink Davis drank was not known but a witness said it was from a container the size of a large soft drink.

According to caffeineinformer.com, a McDonald’s latte has 142 milligrams of caffeine, a 20-ounce Mountain Dew has 90 mg, and a 16-ounce energy drink can have as much as 240 mg.

The US Food and Drug Administration and European Food Safety Authority both say that caffeine consumption of up to 400mg a day – about four or five coffees – is believed to be safe for adults. The EFSA says 200mg a day is safe for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and that single doses of up to 200mg do not give rise to safety concerns. The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages the consumption of caffeine and other stimulants by children and teenagers.

Caffeine has been linked to previous deaths, although the cases are few and far between and the link not always clear-cut. In 2011, 14-year-old US schoolgirl Anais Fournier, who had a pre-existing heart condition, died after drinking two cans of Monster energy drink, containing a total of 480mg of caffeine. The company denied any responsibility.

In 2015, two students at Northumbria University, were were left fighting for their lives after they were accidentally given the equivalent of 300 cups of coffee in a botched experiment. They eventually made a full physical recovery.

Tony Heagerty, professor of medicine at Manchester University, said it was likely that Davis had a genetic heart condition, which may not have revealed itself in the autopsy, and that the caffeine put stress on his heart.

“I think the caffeine must have interacted with something wrong with this heart,” he said. “If you are an unfortunate person with a pre-existing condition and put yourself in a stressful situation by drinking too much caffeine you are in danger.”

But he said the levels consumed by Davis would not be harmful to the overwhelming majority of people, except for making them feel strange.

Mike Knapton, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation, said: “It is well known that caffeine increases a person’s heart rate but it can also trigger more serious effects, including heart palpitations, in those who are more sensitive to caffeine.

“People with cardiac abnormalities, including inherited heart conditions, and those who drink toxic amounts of caffeine are more susceptible to the side-effects of caffeine. Tragic accidents like this are rare but, with increasingly strong coffees and caffeinated drinks on the market, moderation is key to monitoring your caffeine intake.”

Caffeine – what are the dangers?

The World Health Organisation recognises caffeine use disorder and caffeine dependence as illnesses.

Drinking large amounts of coffee can lead to unpleasant side-effects such as irritability, problems sleeping, restlessness, according to the NHS.

It can also result in babies having a low birth weight, which can increase the risk of health problems in later life, or miscarriage.

Caffeine constricts the coronary arteries, leading to a temporary rise in blood pressure. If drunk in sufficient quantities it causes calcium to be discharged from inside cells and causes the heart to beat faster. In the most extreme cases – caffeine toxicity – it causes major organs to shut down.

Symptoms of a caffeine overdose include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions and a high heart rate.

Ebola outbreak declared in Democratic Republic of Congo after three die

An Ebola outbreak has been declared in north-east Democratic Republic of the Congo, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said, after the virus caused three deaths since 22 April.

WHO said the outbreak had affected an equatorial forest region in Bas-Uele province, bordering Central African Republic.

The last Ebola outbreak in Congo in 2014 was quickly contained and killed 49 people, according to official figures.

In a television address, the country’s health minister, Oly Ilunga, confirmed the outbreak and urged the population not to panic.

“[The DRC] has taken all necessary measures to responde quickly and efficiently to this new outbreak,” he said.

WHO said it was working closely with Congolese authorities to help deploy health workers and protective equipment in the remote area to “rapidly control the outbreak”.

In 2013, an Ebola epidemic began in west Africa that killed 11,300 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia and has left thousands more survivors with long-term health problems.

WHO was criticised at the time for responding too slowly and failing to grasp the gravity of the outbreak. An experimental vaccine was recently developed that WHO said could be used in emergencies.