Tag Archives: Alder

Alfie Evans’ parents return to court amid Alder Hey protests

The parents of a boy at the centre of a life-support treatment battle are to launch another legal challenge.

Tom Evans, 21, and Kate James, 20, will ask court of appeal judges on Monday to allow their 23-month-old son, Alfie Evans, to continue to receive treatment.

Alfie Evans


Alfie Evans. Photograph: PA

The couple, from Liverpool, have already lost cases in the high court, court of appeal, supreme court and European court of human rights.

The latest challenge came as the hospital where Alfie is being treated for a rare degenerative brain disease said it had employed extra security personnel because of demonstrations in support of the toddler’s parents.

Evans has said doctors at Alder Hey children’s hospital, in Liverpool, refused to let him remove Alfie from the premises. The parents want to move him to a hospital in Rome or Germany.

Alder Hey said noise from protesters outside the hospital on Sunday night had disturbed other young patients.

“We would ask that noise levels outside the hospital are kept to a minimum and for example car horns are not sounded,” it said in a statement. “Loud and constant noise, such as from car horns, affects sleep and raises anxiety levels for our patients, especially when recovering from procedures, so please bear them in mind.”

Shortly after the statement, Evans posted a video on Facebook of Alfie’s hospital room, from which he said patients could only hear the noise outside if the window was opened. Car horns and cheering could be heard when Evans did so.

Alder Hey advised visitors that there would be more security inside the hospital “and a more controlled approach to access to certain areas”.

Last week, the high court judge Mr Justice Hayden endorsed a detailed plan put forward by Alder Hey doctors for withdrawing life-support treatment.

He said details of that plan could not be revealed because Alfie was entitled to privacy at the end of his life.

The Christian Legal Centre, a group that fights for Christians’ rights and is helping Alfie’s parents, said appeal court judges would be asked to overturn at least one decision made by Hayden last week.

Alfie’s parents last week said their son had improved in recent weeks and they had asked Hayden to allow a new assessment, but he refused. The judge said the unanimous view of medical experts was that Alfie’s brain had been eroded by disease and further assessment was pointless. They also suggested that Alfie was being unlawfully detained at Alder Hey, but the judge dismissed that suggestion.

Appeal court officials said an appeal court judge had decided that Alfie should continue to receive treatment pending the outcome of the hearing that begins on Monday.

Judges have heard that Alfie is in a “semi-vegetative state” and has a degenerative neurological condition that doctors had been unable to diagnose definitively.

Alfie Evans’ parents return to court amid Alder Hey protests

The parents of a boy at the centre of a life-support treatment battle are to launch another legal challenge.

Tom Evans, 21, and Kate James, 20, will ask court of appeal judges on Monday to allow their 23-month-old son, Alfie Evans, to continue to receive treatment.

Alfie Evans


Alfie Evans. Photograph: PA

The couple, from Liverpool, have already lost cases in the high court, court of appeal, supreme court and European court of human rights.

The latest challenge came as the hospital where Alfie is being treated for a rare degenerative brain disease said it had employed extra security personnel because of demonstrations in support of the toddler’s parents.

Evans has said doctors at Alder Hey children’s hospital, in Liverpool, refused to let him remove Alfie from the premises. The parents want to move him to a hospital in Rome or Germany.

Alder Hey said noise from protesters outside the hospital on Sunday night had disturbed other young patients.

“We would ask that noise levels outside the hospital are kept to a minimum and for example car horns are not sounded,” it said in a statement. “Loud and constant noise, such as from car horns, affects sleep and raises anxiety levels for our patients, especially when recovering from procedures, so please bear them in mind.”

Shortly after the statement, Evans posted a video on Facebook of Alfie’s hospital room, from which he said patients could only hear the noise outside if the window was opened. Car horns and cheering could be heard when Evans did so.

Alder Hey advised visitors that there would be more security inside the hospital “and a more controlled approach to access to certain areas”.

Last week, the high court judge Mr Justice Hayden endorsed a detailed plan put forward by Alder Hey doctors for withdrawing life-support treatment.

He said details of that plan could not be revealed because Alfie was entitled to privacy at the end of his life.

The Christian Legal Centre, a group that fights for Christians’ rights and is helping Alfie’s parents, said appeal court judges would be asked to overturn at least one decision made by Hayden last week.

Alfie’s parents last week said their son had improved in recent weeks and they had asked Hayden to allow a new assessment, but he refused. The judge said the unanimous view of medical experts was that Alfie’s brain had been eroded by disease and further assessment was pointless. They also suggested that Alfie was being unlawfully detained at Alder Hey, but the judge dismissed that suggestion.

Appeal court officials said an appeal court judge had decided that Alfie should continue to receive treatment pending the outcome of the hearing that begins on Monday.

Judges have heard that Alfie is in a “semi-vegetative state” and has a degenerative neurological condition that doctors had been unable to diagnose definitively.

Alfie Evans’ parents return to court amid Alder Hey protests

The parents of a boy at the centre of a life-support treatment battle are to launch another legal challenge.

Tom Evans, 21, and Kate James, 20, will ask court of appeal judges on Monday to allow their 23-month-old son, Alfie Evans, to continue to receive treatment.

Alfie Evans


Alfie Evans. Photograph: PA

The couple, from Liverpool, have already lost cases in the high court, court of appeal, supreme court and European court of human rights.

The latest challenge came as the hospital where Alfie is being treated for a rare degenerative brain disease said it had employed extra security personnel because of demonstrations in support of the toddler’s parents.

Evans has said doctors at Alder Hey children’s hospital, in Liverpool, refused to let him remove Alfie from the premises. The parents want to move him to a hospital in Rome or Germany.

Alder Hey said noise from protesters outside the hospital on Sunday night had disturbed other young patients.

“We would ask that noise levels outside the hospital are kept to a minimum and for example car horns are not sounded,” it said in a statement. “Loud and constant noise, such as from car horns, affects sleep and raises anxiety levels for our patients, especially when recovering from procedures, so please bear them in mind.”

Shortly after the statement, Evans posted a video on Facebook of Alfie’s hospital room, from which he said patients could only hear the noise outside if the window was opened. Car horns and cheering could be heard when Evans did so.

Alder Hey advised visitors that there would be more security inside the hospital “and a more controlled approach to access to certain areas”.

Last week, the high court judge Mr Justice Hayden endorsed a detailed plan put forward by Alder Hey doctors for withdrawing life-support treatment.

He said details of that plan could not be revealed because Alfie was entitled to privacy at the end of his life.

The Christian Legal Centre, a group that fights for Christians’ rights and is helping Alfie’s parents, said appeal court judges would be asked to overturn at least one decision made by Hayden last week.

Alfie’s parents last week said their son had improved in recent weeks and they had asked Hayden to allow a new assessment, but he refused. The judge said the unanimous view of medical experts was that Alfie’s brain had been eroded by disease and further assessment was pointless. They also suggested that Alfie was being unlawfully detained at Alder Hey, but the judge dismissed that suggestion.

Appeal court officials said an appeal court judge had decided that Alfie should continue to receive treatment pending the outcome of the hearing that begins on Monday.

Judges have heard that Alfie is in a “semi-vegetative state” and has a degenerative neurological condition that doctors had been unable to diagnose definitively.

Alfie Evans’ parents return to court amid Alder Hey protests

The parents of a boy at the centre of a life-support treatment battle are to launch another legal challenge.

Tom Evans, 21, and Kate James, 20, will ask court of appeal judges on Monday to allow their 23-month-old son, Alfie Evans, to continue to receive treatment.

Alfie Evans


Alfie Evans. Photograph: PA

The couple, from Liverpool, have already lost cases in the high court, court of appeal, supreme court and European court of human rights.

The latest challenge came as the hospital where Alfie is being treated for a rare degenerative brain disease said it had employed extra security personnel because of demonstrations in support of the toddler’s parents.

Evans has said doctors at Alder Hey children’s hospital, in Liverpool, refused to let him remove Alfie from the premises. The parents want to move him to a hospital in Rome or Germany.

Alder Hey said noise from protesters outside the hospital on Sunday night had disturbed other young patients.

“We would ask that noise levels outside the hospital are kept to a minimum and for example car horns are not sounded,” it said in a statement. “Loud and constant noise, such as from car horns, affects sleep and raises anxiety levels for our patients, especially when recovering from procedures, so please bear them in mind.”

Shortly after the statement, Evans posted a video on Facebook of Alfie’s hospital room, from which he said patients could only hear the noise outside if the window was opened. Car horns and cheering could be heard when Evans did so.

Alder Hey advised visitors that there would be more security inside the hospital “and a more controlled approach to access to certain areas”.

Last week, the high court judge Mr Justice Hayden endorsed a detailed plan put forward by Alder Hey doctors for withdrawing life-support treatment.

He said details of that plan could not be revealed because Alfie was entitled to privacy at the end of his life.

The Christian Legal Centre, a group that fights for Christians’ rights and is helping Alfie’s parents, said appeal court judges would be asked to overturn at least one decision made by Hayden last week.

Alfie’s parents last week said their son had improved in recent weeks and they had asked Hayden to allow a new assessment, but he refused. The judge said the unanimous view of medical experts was that Alfie’s brain had been eroded by disease and further assessment was pointless. They also suggested that Alfie was being unlawfully detained at Alder Hey, but the judge dismissed that suggestion.

Appeal court officials said an appeal court judge had decided that Alfie should continue to receive treatment pending the outcome of the hearing that begins on Monday.

Judges have heard that Alfie is in a “semi-vegetative state” and has a degenerative neurological condition that doctors had been unable to diagnose definitively.

Alfie Evans’ parents return to court amid Alder Hey protests

The parents of a boy at the centre of a life-support treatment battle are to launch another legal challenge.

Tom Evans, 21, and Kate James, 20, will ask court of appeal judges on Monday to allow their 23-month-old son, Alfie Evans, to continue to receive treatment.

Alfie Evans


Alfie Evans. Photograph: PA

The couple, from Liverpool, have already lost cases in the high court, court of appeal, supreme court and European court of human rights.

The latest challenge came as the hospital where Alfie is being treated for a rare degenerative brain disease said it had employed extra security personnel because of demonstrations in support of the toddler’s parents.

Evans has said doctors at Alder Hey children’s hospital, in Liverpool, refused to let him remove Alfie from the premises. The parents want to move him to a hospital in Rome or Germany.

Alder Hey said noise from protesters outside the hospital on Sunday night had disturbed other young patients.

“We would ask that noise levels outside the hospital are kept to a minimum and for example car horns are not sounded,” it said in a statement. “Loud and constant noise, such as from car horns, affects sleep and raises anxiety levels for our patients, especially when recovering from procedures, so please bear them in mind.”

Shortly after the statement, Evans posted a video on Facebook of Alfie’s hospital room, from which he said patients could only hear the noise outside if the window was opened. Car horns and cheering could be heard when Evans did so.

Alder Hey advised visitors that there would be more security inside the hospital “and a more controlled approach to access to certain areas”.

Last week the high court judge Mr Justice Hayden endorsed a detailed plan put forward by Alder Hey doctors for withdrawing life-support treatment.

He said details of that plan could not be revealed because Alfie was entitled to privacy at the end of his life.

The Christian Legal Centre, a group that fights for Christians’ rights and is helping Alfie’s parents, said appeal court judges would be asked to overturn at least one decision made by Hayden last week.

Alfie’s parents last week said their son had improved in recent weeks and they had asked Hayden to allow a new assessment, but he refused. The judge said the unanimous view of medical experts was that Alfie’s brain had been eroded by disease and further assessment was pointless. They also suggested that Alfie was being unlawfully detained at Alder Hey, but the judge dismissed that suggestion.

Appeal court officials said an appeal court judge had decided that Alfie should continue to receive treatment pending the outcome of the hearing that begins on Monday.

Judges have heard that Alfie is in a “semi-vegetative state” and has a degenerative neurological condition that doctors had been unable to diagnose definitively.

Alder Hey children’s hospital fails 4 in five standards checks

Alder Hey hospital board

The Care Quality Commission identified ‘very worring problems’ at Alder Hey, like managers allegedly not listening to theatre workers complaints. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for the Guardian

A single of England’s 4 kids-only hospitals has “extremely worrying troubles” in its working theatres, in accordance to security watchdogs.

Alder Hey in Liverpool failed to meet 4 of five nationwide standards checked by inspectors from the Care High quality Commission (CQC) in December. There was a faulty emergency phone alarm method, possible safety incidents, and “close to misses” went unreported, while operations had been cancelled due to the fact of employees shortages.

There were also issues in the theatres about lack of ample gear to keep track of patients and poor maintenance checks.

Staffing problems meant that individuals in the theatre recovery spot following surgery had been at improved risk, too.

There have been also complaints from theatre workers that managers did not pay attention to their “repeated issues”. Some wards at the hospital did not have ample certified, skilled and experienced staff, in accordance to the CQC.

The CQC’s regional director, Malcolm Bower-Brown, said: “The troubles we recognized at the Alder Hey hospital are very worrying. We have advised the believe in the place more action have to be taken to make sure national specifications are met and that patients acquire the good quality of care they are entitled to assume.”

The unannounced pay a visit to by the CQC in December came right after it was alerted by theatre workers more than their issues about standards. Its report fails the hospital on care and welfare of individuals making use of its services, staffing, support of employees and high quality monitoring. Cleanliness and infection management met nationwide specifications.

A report by the hospital’s director of nursing, Gill Core, had presently warned of shortcuts in security processes, “restricted reporting of incidents”, and a belief among staff that senior managers condoned the working circumstances.

Two years ago, the Royal University of Surgeons warned that relations within the surgical department had broken down, even though total surgical efficiency was protected.

Louise Shepherd, chief executive of the basis hospital trust, explained there was “no evidence that individuals have been harmed as a consequence of these concerns and we continue to be assured that we are providing a safe service for our youngsters and youthful people”. An action plan had already been created and “many” components of it implemented.

But Shepherd stated it was regrettable that a small number of the theatre staff felt they had had to speak to the CQC about how they had been supported at operate. “Theatres by nature are extremely stressful, demanding operating environments and we are also facing an increased demand on our solutions,” she added.