Tag Archives: Brain

Brain drain: our default responses to flu | Daniel Glaser

I’ve been laid up with flu and as I return to full cognitive function, I’ve been pondering the neuroscience. A fever’s tweak to your temperature regulation circuits triggers not only shivering, but also indirect loops. ‘Feeling’ cold can make you turn up the thermostat, grab blankets and take to your bed.

It’s not clear whether it’s the bug or your defences that are in control, but using your body as a laboratory, it’s fascinating to wait for the paracetamol to work. When it hits you suddenly start sweating and kick off the covers as your hypothalamus catches on to the actual temperature of your body.

Researchers have been looking at external signs, too. Evidence suggests the walking patterns, sweat and facial expression of sufferers can reflect their infection before even they are aware of it. This may help others to steer clear.

Internet activity is a promising avenue, too. The ‘Google flu trends’ project is currently suspended, in public at least, pending improvements. But within the rich mine of subconscious information we reveal through our searches, we perhaps find the earliest traces of infection. Keep well, everyone.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain drain: our default responses to flu | Daniel Glaser

I’ve been laid up with flu and as I return to full cognitive function, I’ve been pondering the neuroscience. A fever’s tweak to your temperature regulation circuits triggers not only shivering, but also indirect loops. ‘Feeling’ cold can make you turn up the thermostat, grab blankets and take to your bed.

It’s not clear whether it’s the bug or your defences that are in control, but using your body as a laboratory, it’s fascinating to wait for the paracetamol to work. When it hits you suddenly start sweating and kick off the covers as your hypothalamus catches on to the actual temperature of your body.

Researchers have been looking at external signs, too. Evidence suggests the walking patterns, sweat and facial expression of sufferers can reflect their infection before even they are aware of it. This may help others to steer clear.

Internet activity is a promising avenue, too. The ‘Google flu trends’ project is currently suspended, in public at least, pending improvements. But within the rich mine of subconscious information we reveal through our searches, we perhaps find the earliest traces of infection. Keep well, everyone.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain drain: our default responses to flu | Daniel Glaser

I’ve been laid up with flu and as I return to full cognitive function, I’ve been pondering the neuroscience. A fever’s tweak to your temperature regulation circuits triggers not only shivering, but also indirect loops. ‘Feeling’ cold can make you turn up the thermostat, grab blankets and take to your bed.

It’s not clear whether it’s the bug or your defences that are in control, but using your body as a laboratory, it’s fascinating to wait for the paracetamol to work. When it hits you suddenly start sweating and kick off the covers as your hypothalamus catches on to the actual temperature of your body.

Researchers have been looking at external signs, too. Evidence suggests the walking patterns, sweat and facial expression of sufferers can reflect their infection before even they are aware of it. This may help others to steer clear.

Internet activity is a promising avenue, too. The ‘Google flu trends’ project is currently suspended, in public at least, pending improvements. But within the rich mine of subconscious information we reveal through our searches, we perhaps find the earliest traces of infection. Keep well, everyone.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser

We are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few exceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning of the connections between cells takes place. This neural topiary shapes all the systems of the brain. But once into adulthood, although some new connections are formed, the main structural change is the steady death of our brain cells.

Many aspects of life cause our cells to die off, including trauma, drug use, environmental pollutants, strokes… and that’s before we start on age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Yet the quality of our brain function doesn’t decline for most of adulthood. Maybe as our cells decrease we learn to adapt, picking up tricks to help us to make the best of what we’ve got.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser

We are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few exceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning of the connections between cells takes place. This neural topiary shapes all the systems of the brain. But once into adulthood, although some new connections are formed, the main structural change is the steady death of our brain cells.

Many aspects of life cause our cells to die off, including trauma, drug use, environmental pollutants, strokes… and that’s before we start on age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Yet the quality of our brain function doesn’t decline for most of adulthood. Maybe as our cells decrease we learn to adapt, picking up tricks to help us to make the best of what we’ve got.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser

We are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few exceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning of the connections between cells takes place. This neural topiary shapes all the systems of the brain. But once into adulthood, although some new connections are formed, the main structural change is the steady death of our brain cells.

Many aspects of life cause our cells to die off, including trauma, drug use, environmental pollutants, strokes… and that’s before we start on age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Yet the quality of our brain function doesn’t decline for most of adulthood. Maybe as our cells decrease we learn to adapt, picking up tricks to help us to make the best of what we’ve got.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser

We are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few exceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning of the connections between cells takes place. This neural topiary shapes all the systems of the brain. But once into adulthood, although some new connections are formed, the main structural change is the steady death of our brain cells.

Many aspects of life cause our cells to die off, including trauma, drug use, environmental pollutants, strokes… and that’s before we start on age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Yet the quality of our brain function doesn’t decline for most of adulthood. Maybe as our cells decrease we learn to adapt, picking up tricks to help us to make the best of what we’ve got.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser

We are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few exceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning of the connections between cells takes place. This neural topiary shapes all the systems of the brain. But once into adulthood, although some new connections are formed, the main structural change is the steady death of our brain cells.

Many aspects of life cause our cells to die off, including trauma, drug use, environmental pollutants, strokes… and that’s before we start on age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Yet the quality of our brain function doesn’t decline for most of adulthood. Maybe as our cells decrease we learn to adapt, picking up tricks to help us to make the best of what we’ve got.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser

We are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few exceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning of the connections between cells takes place. This neural topiary shapes all the systems of the brain. But once into adulthood, although some new connections are formed, the main structural change is the steady death of our brain cells.

Many aspects of life cause our cells to die off, including trauma, drug use, environmental pollutants, strokes… and that’s before we start on age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Yet the quality of our brain function doesn’t decline for most of adulthood. Maybe as our cells decrease we learn to adapt, picking up tricks to help us to make the best of what we’ve got.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser

We are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few exceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning of the connections between cells takes place. This neural topiary shapes all the systems of the brain. But once into adulthood, although some new connections are formed, the main structural change is the steady death of our brain cells.

Many aspects of life cause our cells to die off, including trauma, drug use, environmental pollutants, strokes… and that’s before we start on age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Yet the quality of our brain function doesn’t decline for most of adulthood. Maybe as our cells decrease we learn to adapt, picking up tricks to help us to make the best of what we’ve got.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London