Tag Archives: Brain

Brain game: the freaky factor of artificial intelligence | Daniel Glaser

The release of Blade Runner 2049 has once again inspired us to imagine what it would be like if the distinction between artificial life and humans all but disappeared. Once something else is almost as ‘real’ as us, the idea of what it means to be human is challenged.

Neuroscientists know already that such a scenario is disturbing to us – thanks to a phenomenon known as Uncanny Valley. In the experiment, when people were faced with robots that looked very robotic (think flashing lights and metal), their response was fine. But the more human the robot became, the stronger their antipathy, discomfort and even revulsion – and the spookier it seemed.

In studies we measure the degree to which anything is human in terms of how it looks, how it moves and how it responds. In all cases the more artificial anything seems, the more easily we cope. Of course, once the difference between us and artificial life is undetectable, our response is exactly the same. At which point, the tables will turn – an enduring theme in Blade Runner - and it will be the robots who struggle with the idea of who they are and what it means to be human.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain game: the freaky factor of artificial intelligence | Daniel Glaser

The release of Blade Runner 2049 has once again inspired us to imagine what it would be like if the distinction between artificial life and humans all but disappeared. Once something else is almost as ‘real’ as us, the idea of what it means to be human is challenged.

Neuroscientists know already that such a scenario is disturbing to us – thanks to a phenomenon known as Uncanny Valley. In the experiment, when people were faced with robots that looked very robotic (think flashing lights and metal), their response was fine. But the more human the robot became, the stronger their antipathy, discomfort and even revulsion – and the spookier it seemed.

In studies we measure the degree to which anything is human in terms of how it looks, how it moves and how it responds. In all cases the more artificial anything seems, the more easily we cope. Of course, once the difference between us and artificial life is undetectable, our response is exactly the same. At which point, the tables will turn – an enduring theme in Blade Runner - and it will be the robots who struggle with the idea of who they are and what it means to be human.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

Brain game: the freaky factor of artificial intelligence | Daniel Glaser

The release of Blade Runner 2049 has once again inspired us to imagine what it would be like if the distinction between artificial life and humans all but disappeared. Once something else is almost as ‘real’ as us, the idea of what it means to be human is challenged.

Neuroscientists know already that such a scenario is disturbing to us – thanks to a phenomenon known as Uncanny Valley. In the experiment, when people were faced with robots that looked very robotic (think flashing lights and metal), their response was fine. But the more human the robot became, the stronger their antipathy, discomfort and even revulsion – and the spookier it seemed.

In studies we measure the degree to which anything is human in terms of how it looks, how it moves and how it responds. In all cases the more artificial anything seems, the more easily we cope. Of course, once the difference between us and artificial life is undetectable, our response is exactly the same. At which point, the tables will turn – an enduring theme in Blade Runner - and it will be the robots who struggle with the idea of who they are and what it means to be human.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

The brain game: what and where we remember | Daniel Glaser

As we return to school and work from blissful relaxation, one of our anxieties is how we’ll get the information we once knew back into our heads. An elegant experiment from the 1970s might give us some reassurance, particularly if we’ve just been on the beach.

Alan Baddeley worked with divers to see what the effect of context was on recall. The divers were given two lists of words to remember, one set on dry land and one set underwater. They were then tested on both sets in each environment. The results clearly showed they were better at recalling things when in the context where they learned them. The words had no relation to water or land so the effect had nothing to do with the content.

The way we encode and retrieve is all about linking details together, so what is learned in, say, the classroom or the office, is easier to retrieve in those places than on a beach.

Part of the joy and benefit of holiday is the creativity that arises when the weight of our daily routine is lifted. But don’t worry, when you bump into John from accounts, the full detail of all your budget spreadsheets will come flooding back.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

The brain game: what and where we remember | Daniel Glaser

As we return to school and work from blissful relaxation, one of our anxieties is how we’ll get the information we once knew back into our heads. An elegant experiment from the 1970s might give us some reassurance, particularly if we’ve just been on the beach.

Alan Baddeley worked with divers to see what the effect of context was on recall. The divers were given two lists of words to remember, one set on dry land and one set underwater. They were then tested on both sets in each environment. The results clearly showed they were better at recalling things when in the context where they learned them. The words had no relation to water or land so the effect had nothing to do with the content.

The way we encode and retrieve is all about linking details together, so what is learned in, say, the classroom or the office, is easier to retrieve in those places than on a beach.

Part of the joy and benefit of holiday is the creativity that arises when the weight of our daily routine is lifted. But don’t worry, when you bump into John from accounts, the full detail of all your budget spreadsheets will come flooding back.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

The brain game: what and where we remember | Daniel Glaser

As we return to school and work from blissful relaxation, one of our anxieties is how we’ll get the information we once knew back into our heads. An elegant experiment from the 1970s might give us some reassurance, particularly if we’ve just been on the beach.

Alan Baddeley worked with divers to see what the effect of context was on recall. The divers were given two lists of words to remember, one set on dry land and one set underwater. They were then tested on both sets in each environment. The results clearly showed they were better at recalling things when in the context where they learned them. The words had no relation to water or land so the effect had nothing to do with the content.

The way we encode and retrieve is all about linking details together, so what is learned in, say, the classroom or the office, is easier to retrieve in those places than on a beach.

Part of the joy and benefit of holiday is the creativity that arises when the weight of our daily routine is lifted. But don’t worry, when you bump into John from accounts, the full detail of all your budget spreadsheets will come flooding back.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

The brain game: what and where we remember | Daniel Glaser

As we return to school and work from blissful relaxation, one of our anxieties is how we’ll get the information we once knew back into our heads. An elegant experiment from the 1970s might give us some reassurance, particularly if we’ve just been on the beach.

Alan Baddeley worked with divers to see what the effect of context was on recall. The divers were given two lists of words to remember, one set on dry land and one set underwater. They were then tested on both sets in each environment. The results clearly showed they were better at recalling things when in the context where they learned them. The words had no relation to water or land so the effect had nothing to do with the content.

The way we encode and retrieve is all about linking details together, so what is learned in, say, the classroom or the office, is easier to retrieve in those places than on a beach.

Part of the joy and benefit of holiday is the creativity that arises when the weight of our daily routine is lifted. But don’t worry, when you bump into John from accounts, the full detail of all your budget spreadsheets will come flooding back.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

The brain game: what and where we remember | Daniel Glaser

As we return to school and work from blissful relaxation, one of our anxieties is how we’ll get the information we once knew back into our heads. An elegant experiment from the 1970s might give us some reassurance, particularly if we’ve just been on the beach.

Alan Baddeley worked with divers to see what the effect of context was on recall. The divers were given two lists of words to remember, one set on dry land and one set underwater. They were then tested on both sets in each environment. The results clearly showed they were better at recalling things when in the context where they learned them. The words had no relation to water or land so the effect had nothing to do with the content.

The way we encode and retrieve is all about linking details together, so what is learned in, say, the classroom or the office, is easier to retrieve in those places than on a beach.

Part of the joy and benefit of holiday is the creativity that arises when the weight of our daily routine is lifted. But don’t worry, when you bump into John from accounts, the full detail of all your budget spreadsheets will come flooding back.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

The brain game: what and where we remember | Daniel Glaser

As we return to school and work from blissful relaxation, one of our anxieties is how we’ll get the information we once knew back into our heads. An elegant experiment from the 1970s might give us some reassurance, particularly if we’ve just been on the beach.

Alan Baddeley worked with divers to see what the effect of context was on recall. The divers were given two lists of words to remember, one set on dry land and one set underwater. They were then tested on both sets in each environment. The results clearly showed they were better at recalling things when in the context where they learned them. The words had no relation to water or land so the effect had nothing to do with the content.

The way we encode and retrieve is all about linking details together, so what is learned in, say, the classroom or the office, is easier to retrieve in those places than on a beach.

Part of the joy and benefit of holiday is the creativity that arises when the weight of our daily routine is lifted. But don’t worry, when you bump into John from accounts, the full detail of all your budget spreadsheets will come flooding back.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London

The brain game: what and where we remember | Daniel Glaser

As we return to school and work from blissful relaxation, one of our anxieties is how we’ll get the information we once knew back into our heads. An elegant experiment from the 1970s might give us some reassurance, particularly if we’ve just been on the beach.

Alan Baddeley worked with divers to see what the effect of context was on recall. The divers were given two lists of words to remember, one set on dry land and one set underwater. They were then tested on both sets in each environment. The results clearly showed they were better at recalling things when in the context where they learned them. The words had no relation to water or land so the effect had nothing to do with the content.

The way we encode and retrieve is all about linking details together, so what is learned in, say, the classroom or the office, is easier to retrieve in those places than on a beach.

Part of the joy and benefit of holiday is the creativity that arises when the weight of our daily routine is lifted. But don’t worry, when you bump into John from accounts, the full detail of all your budget spreadsheets will come flooding back.

Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science Gallery at King’s College London