Tag Archives: Case

China confirms first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu

A 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on Christmas Day and was admitted to hospital

China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu


China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu Photograph: Kin Cheung/AP

A woman from eastern China has been confirmed as the first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu, according to Chinese authorities.

Officials in Hong Kong have advised citizens to avoid wet markets, live poultry markets or farms if travelling to the mainland over the week-long lunar new year holiday which starts on Thursday.

The 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on 25 December, was admitted to hospital for treatment on 1 January and was released on 22 January.

“She had contact with live poultry before the onset of symptoms,” Hong Kong’s centre for health protection (CHP) said in an alert on Wednesday evening. “According to a report from the Chinese centre for disease control and prevention, upon analysis, the genes of the virus were determined to be of avian origin.”

A CHP spokesperson said the diagnosis had been confirmed earlier this week and added: “Travellers to the mainland or other affected areas must avoid visiting wet markets, live poultry markets or farms. They should be alert to the presence of backyard poultry when visiting relatives and friends.

“They should also avoid purchasing live or freshly slaughtered poultry, and avoid touching poultry/birds or their droppings. They should strictly observe personal and hand hygiene when visiting any place with live poultry.

“Travellers returning from affected areas should consult a doctor promptly if symptoms develop, and inform the doctor of their travel history for prompt diagnosis and treatment of potential diseases,” the CHP alert said.

According to the US government’s centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) the most frequently identified subtypes of avian influenza known to have infected human beings are the H5, H7 and H9 viruses although such transmissions are rare. There are nine known subtypes of H7 viruses, of which H7N4 is one and in most cases human infection is uncommon.

“The most frequently identified H7 viruses associated with human infection are Asian lineage avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses, which were first detected in China in 2013. While human infections are rare, these have commonly resulted in severe respiratory illness and death,” advice on the CDC website says.

“In addition to Asian lineage H7N9 viruses, H7N2, H7N3, H7N7 virus infections have been reported. These viruses have primarily caused mild to moderate illness in people, with symptoms that include conjunctivitis and/or upper respiratory tract symptoms.”

Authorities have been concerned about the possibility of a potentially devastating human bird flu pandemic in Hong Kong since late 1997 when 18 locals were infected with the H5N1 virus, six of whom died.

On Wednesday the CHP said it would “remain vigilant and work closely with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities to monitor the latest developments”. It urged citizens “to maintain strict personal, food and environmental hygiene”.

China confirms first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu

A 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on Christmas Day and was admitted to hospital

China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu


China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu Photograph: Kin Cheung/AP

A woman from eastern China has been confirmed as the first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu, according to Chinese authorities.

Officials in Hong Kong have advised citizens to avoid wet markets, live poultry markets or farms if travelling to the mainland over the week-long lunar new year holiday which starts on Thursday.

The 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on 25 December, was admitted to hospital for treatment on 1 January and was released on 22 January.

“She had contact with live poultry before the onset of symptoms,” Hong Kong’s centre for health protection (CHP) said in an alert on Wednesday evening. “According to a report from the Chinese centre for disease control and prevention, upon analysis, the genes of the virus were determined to be of avian origin.”

A CHP spokesperson said the diagnosis had been confirmed earlier this week and added: “Travellers to the mainland or other affected areas must avoid visiting wet markets, live poultry markets or farms. They should be alert to the presence of backyard poultry when visiting relatives and friends.

“They should also avoid purchasing live or freshly slaughtered poultry, and avoid touching poultry/birds or their droppings. They should strictly observe personal and hand hygiene when visiting any place with live poultry.

“Travellers returning from affected areas should consult a doctor promptly if symptoms develop, and inform the doctor of their travel history for prompt diagnosis and treatment of potential diseases,” the CHP alert said.

According to the US government’s centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) the most frequently identified subtypes of avian influenza known to have infected human beings are the H5, H7 and H9 viruses although such transmissions are rare. There are nine known subtypes of H7 viruses, of which H7N4 is one and in most cases human infection is uncommon.

“The most frequently identified H7 viruses associated with human infection are Asian lineage avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses, which were first detected in China in 2013. While human infections are rare, these have commonly resulted in severe respiratory illness and death,” advice on the CDC website says.

“In addition to Asian lineage H7N9 viruses, H7N2, H7N3, H7N7 virus infections have been reported. These viruses have primarily caused mild to moderate illness in people, with symptoms that include conjunctivitis and/or upper respiratory tract symptoms.”

Authorities have been concerned about the possibility of a potentially devastating human bird flu pandemic in Hong Kong since late 1997 when 18 locals were infected with the H5N1 virus, six of whom died.

On Wednesday the CHP said it would “remain vigilant and work closely with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities to monitor the latest developments”. It urged citizens “to maintain strict personal, food and environmental hygiene”.

China confirms first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu

A 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on Christmas Day and was admitted to hospital

China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu


China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu Photograph: Kin Cheung/AP

A woman from eastern China has been confirmed as the first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu, according to Chinese authorities.

Officials in Hong Kong have advised citizens to avoid wet markets, live poultry markets or farms if travelling to the mainland over the week-long lunar new year holiday which starts on Thursday.

The 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on 25 December, was admitted to hospital for treatment on 1 January and was released on 22 January.

“She had contact with live poultry before the onset of symptoms,” Hong Kong’s centre for health protection (CHP) said in an alert on Wednesday evening. “According to a report from the Chinese centre for disease control and prevention, upon analysis, the genes of the virus were determined to be of avian origin.”

A CHP spokesperson said the diagnosis had been confirmed earlier this week and added: “Travellers to the mainland or other affected areas must avoid visiting wet markets, live poultry markets or farms. They should be alert to the presence of backyard poultry when visiting relatives and friends.

“They should also avoid purchasing live or freshly slaughtered poultry, and avoid touching poultry/birds or their droppings. They should strictly observe personal and hand hygiene when visiting any place with live poultry.

“Travellers returning from affected areas should consult a doctor promptly if symptoms develop, and inform the doctor of their travel history for prompt diagnosis and treatment of potential diseases,” the CHP alert said.

According to the US government’s centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) the most frequently identified subtypes of avian influenza known to have infected human beings are the H5, H7 and H9 viruses although such transmissions are rare. There are nine known subtypes of H7 viruses, of which H7N4 is one and in most cases human infection is uncommon.

“The most frequently identified H7 viruses associated with human infection are Asian lineage avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses, which were first detected in China in 2013. While human infections are rare, these have commonly resulted in severe respiratory illness and death,” advice on the CDC website says.

“In addition to Asian lineage H7N9 viruses, H7N2, H7N3, H7N7 virus infections have been reported. These viruses have primarily caused mild to moderate illness in people, with symptoms that include conjunctivitis and/or upper respiratory tract symptoms.”

Authorities have been concerned about the possibility of a potentially devastating human bird flu pandemic in Hong Kong since late 1997 when 18 locals were infected with the H5N1 virus, six of whom died.

On Wednesday the CHP said it would “remain vigilant and work closely with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities to monitor the latest developments”. It urged citizens “to maintain strict personal, food and environmental hygiene”.

China confirms first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu

A 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on Christmas Day and was admitted to hospital

China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu


China has confirmed first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu Photograph: Kin Cheung/AP

A woman from eastern China has been confirmed as the first ever human case of H7N4 bird flu, according to Chinese authorities.

Officials in Hong Kong have advised citizens to avoid wet markets, live poultry markets or farms if travelling to the mainland over the week-long lunar new year holiday which starts on Thursday.

The 68-year-old patient from Jiangsu province, who has since recovered, developed symptoms on 25 December, was admitted to hospital for treatment on 1 January and was released on 22 January.

“She had contact with live poultry before the onset of symptoms,” Hong Kong’s centre for health protection (CHP) said in an alert on Wednesday evening. “According to a report from the Chinese centre for disease control and prevention, upon analysis, the genes of the virus were determined to be of avian origin.”

A CHP spokesperson said the diagnosis had been confirmed earlier this week and added: “Travellers to the mainland or other affected areas must avoid visiting wet markets, live poultry markets or farms. They should be alert to the presence of backyard poultry when visiting relatives and friends.

“They should also avoid purchasing live or freshly slaughtered poultry, and avoid touching poultry/birds or their droppings. They should strictly observe personal and hand hygiene when visiting any place with live poultry.

“Travellers returning from affected areas should consult a doctor promptly if symptoms develop, and inform the doctor of their travel history for prompt diagnosis and treatment of potential diseases,” the CHP alert said.

According to the US government’s centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) the most frequently identified subtypes of avian influenza known to have infected human beings are the H5, H7 and H9 viruses although such transmissions are rare. There are nine known subtypes of H7 viruses, of which H7N4 is one and in most cases human infection is uncommon.

“The most frequently identified H7 viruses associated with human infection are Asian lineage avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses, which were first detected in China in 2013. While human infections are rare, these have commonly resulted in severe respiratory illness and death,” advice on the CDC website says.

“In addition to Asian lineage H7N9 viruses, H7N2, H7N3, H7N7 virus infections have been reported. These viruses have primarily caused mild to moderate illness in people, with symptoms that include conjunctivitis and/or upper respiratory tract symptoms.”

Authorities have been concerned about the possibility of a potentially devastating human bird flu pandemic in Hong Kong since late 1997 when 18 locals were infected with the H5N1 virus, six of whom died.

On Wednesday the CHP said it would “remain vigilant and work closely with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities to monitor the latest developments”. It urged citizens “to maintain strict personal, food and environmental hygiene”.

Transgender woman able to breastfeed in first documented case

Doctors hail breakthrough and say case shows ‘modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women’

The report was published in the journal Transgender Health.


The report was published in the journal Transgender Health. Photograph: Yui Mok/PA

A 30-year-old transgender woman has been able to breastfeed her child, the first ever case of induced lactation in a transgender woman to be documented in academic literature.

Doctors said the case shows “modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women”. The account was published in Transgender Health.

Tamar Reisman of Mount Sinai hospital in New York, one of the doctors who reported the case, said: “Transgender medicine is becoming part of mainstream medicine. We’re getting more evidence-based data, we’re getting more standardized care, we’re getting more reproductive options.”

The transgender woman went to doctors when her partner was five months pregnant. She said her partner did not want to breastfeed the couple’s child, so she hoped to take on the responsibility.

Reisman and Zil Goldstein wrote that the woman was being treated for insomnia and anxiety, but otherwise appeared to be a “pleasant, well-nourished, well-developed woman”.

The patient had taken hormone therapy for six years, but had not had gender reassignment or breast augmentation before she approached doctors. Reisman and Goldstein used a framework known to induce lactation in cisgender women who had not experienced a pregnancy to promote the patient’s lactation.

The patient took a gradually increasing regimen of the female hormones progesterone and estradiol, stimulated her chest with a breast milk pump, and took domperidone, a nausea medication known to increase milk production.

Domperidone is used internationally but it is not approved in the US, because in some intravenous instances it produced cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. It is licensed to treat nausea in the UK. The patient obtained the drug from Canada.

Reisman said that with an optimized hormone regimen it may be possible to induce lactation without domperidone, because chest stimulation naturally increases the breast milk-producing hormone prolactin.

“There have been self-reported cases online of transgender woman trying DIY regiments to induce breastfeeding, but this is the first case of induced functional lactation in the academic literature,” Reisman said. There are also cases of transgender men carrying pregnancies and breastfeeding, she said.

However, Reisman said the case has also attracted questions about whether men could now breastfeed. “That, implicitly, is saying that you see transgender women as cisgender men, which is transphobic,” she said.

Joshua Safer, an endocrinologist at Boston Medical Center not involved in the case, told the New Scientist the report is “a very big deal”.

“Many transgender women are looking to have as many of the experiences of non-transgender women as they can, so I can see this will be extremely popular,” Safer said.

Transgender woman able to breastfeed in first documented case

Doctors hail breakthrough and say case shows ‘modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women’

The report was published in the journal Transgender Health.


The report was published in the journal Transgender Health. Photograph: Yui Mok/PA

A 30-year-old transgender woman has been able to breastfeed her child, the first ever case of induced lactation in a transgender woman to be documented in academic literature.

Doctors said the case shows “modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women”. The account was published in Transgender Health.

Tamar Reisman of Mount Sinai hospital in New York, one of the doctors who reported the case, said: “Transgender medicine is becoming part of mainstream medicine. We’re getting more evidence-based data, we’re getting more standardized care, we’re getting more reproductive options.”

The transgender woman went to doctors when her partner was five months pregnant. She said her partner did not want to breastfeed the couple’s child, so she hoped to take on the responsibility.

Reisman and Zil Goldstein wrote that the woman was being treated for insomnia and anxiety, but otherwise appeared to be a “pleasant, well-nourished, well-developed woman”.

The patient had taken hormone therapy for six years, but had not had gender reassignment or breast augmentation before she approached doctors. Reisman and Goldstein used a framework known to induce lactation in cisgender women who had not experienced a pregnancy to promote the patient’s lactation.

The patient took a gradually increasing regimen of the female hormones progesterone and estradiol, stimulated her chest with a breast milk pump, and took domperidone, a nausea medication known to increase milk production.

Domperidone is used internationally but it is not approved in the US, because in some intravenous instances it produced cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. It is licensed to treat nausea in the UK. The patient obtained the drug from Canada.

Reisman said that with an optimized hormone regimen it may be possible to induce lactation without domperidone, because chest stimulation naturally increases the breast milk-producing hormone prolactin.

“There have been self-reported cases online of transgender woman trying DIY regiments to induce breastfeeding, but this is the first case of induced functional lactation in the academic literature,” Reisman said. There are also cases of transgender men carrying pregnancies and breastfeeding, she said.

However, Reisman said the case has also attracted questions about whether men could now breastfeed. “That, implicitly, is saying that you see transgender women as cisgender men, which is transphobic,” she said.

Joshua Safer, an endocrinologist at Boston Medical Center not involved in the case, told the New Scientist the report is “a very big deal”.

“Many transgender women are looking to have as many of the experiences of non-transgender women as they can, so I can see this will be extremely popular,” Safer said.

Transgender woman able to breastfeed in first documented case

Doctors hail breakthrough and say case shows ‘modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women’

The report was published in the journal Transgender Health.


The report was published in the journal Transgender Health. Photograph: Yui Mok/PA

A 30-year-old transgender woman has been able to breastfeed her child, the first ever case of induced lactation in a transgender woman to be documented in academic literature.

Doctors said the case shows “modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women”. The account was published in Transgender Health.

Tamar Reisman of Mount Sinai hospital in New York, one of the doctors who reported the case, said: “Transgender medicine is becoming part of mainstream medicine. We’re getting more evidence-based data, we’re getting more standardized care, we’re getting more reproductive options.”

The transgender woman went to doctors when her partner was five months pregnant. She said her partner did not want to breastfeed the couple’s child, so she hoped to take on the responsibility.

Reisman and Zil Goldstein wrote that the woman was being treated for insomnia and anxiety, but otherwise appeared to be a “pleasant, well-nourished, well-developed woman”.

The patient had taken hormone therapy for six years, but had not had gender reassignment or breast augmentation before she approached doctors. Reisman and Goldstein used a framework known to induce lactation in cisgender women who had not experienced a pregnancy to promote the patient’s lactation.

The patient took a gradually increasing regimen of the female hormones progesterone and estradiol, stimulated her chest with a breast milk pump, and took domperidone, a nausea medication known to increase milk production.

Domperidone is used internationally but it is not approved in the US, because in some intravenous instances it produced cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. It is licensed to treat nausea in the UK. The patient obtained the drug from Canada.

Reisman said that with an optimized hormone regimen it may be possible to induce lactation without domperidone, because chest stimulation naturally increases the breast milk-producing hormone prolactin.

“There have been self-reported cases online of transgender woman trying DIY regiments to induce breastfeeding, but this is the first case of induced functional lactation in the academic literature,” Reisman said. There are also cases of transgender men carrying pregnancies and breastfeeding, she said.

However, Reisman said the case has also attracted questions about whether men could now breastfeed. “That, implicitly, is saying that you see transgender women as cisgender men, which is transphobic,” she said.

Joshua Safer, an endocrinologist at Boston Medical Center not involved in the case, told the New Scientist the report is “a very big deal”.

“Many transgender women are looking to have as many of the experiences of non-transgender women as they can, so I can see this will be extremely popular,” Safer said.

Transgender woman able to breastfeed in first documented case

Doctors hail breakthrough and say case shows ‘modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women’

The report was published in the journal Transgender Health.


The report was published in the journal Transgender Health. Photograph: Yui Mok/PA

A 30-year-old transgender woman has been able to breastfeed her child, the first ever case of induced lactation in a transgender woman to be documented in academic literature.

Doctors said the case shows “modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women”. The account was published in Transgender Health.

Tamar Reisman of Mount Sinai hospital in New York, one of the doctors who reported the case, said: “Transgender medicine is becoming part of mainstream medicine. We’re getting more evidence-based data, we’re getting more standardized care, we’re getting more reproductive options.”

The transgender woman went to doctors when her partner was five months pregnant. She said her partner did not want to breastfeed the couple’s child, so she hoped to take on the responsibility.

Reisman and Zil Goldstein wrote that the woman was being treated for insomnia and anxiety, but otherwise appeared to be a “pleasant, well-nourished, well-developed woman”.

The patient had taken hormone therapy for six years, but had not had gender reassignment or breast augmentation before she approached doctors. Reisman and Goldstein used a framework known to induce lactation in cisgender women who had not experienced a pregnancy to promote the patient’s lactation.

The patient took a gradually increasing regimen of the female hormones progesterone and estradiol, stimulated her chest with a breast milk pump, and took domperidone, a nausea medication known to increase milk production.

Domperidone is used internationally but it is not approved in the US, because in some intravenous instances it produced cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. It is licensed to treat nausea in the UK. The patient obtained the drug from Canada.

Reisman said that with an optimized hormone regimen it may be possible to induce lactation without domperidone, because chest stimulation naturally increases the breast milk-producing hormone prolactin.

“There have been self-reported cases online of transgender woman trying DIY regiments to induce breastfeeding, but this is the first case of induced functional lactation in the academic literature,” Reisman said. There are also cases of transgender men carrying pregnancies and breastfeeding, she said.

However, Reisman said the case has also attracted questions about whether men could now breastfeed. “That, implicitly, is saying that you see transgender women as cisgender men, which is transphobic,” she said.

Joshua Safer, an endocrinologist at Boston Medical Center not involved in the case, told the New Scientist the report is “a very big deal”.

“Many transgender women are looking to have as many of the experiences of non-transgender women as they can, so I can see this will be extremely popular,” Safer said.

El Salvador court upholds 30-year jail sentence in stillbirth case

An El Salvador court has rejected the appeal of a woman sentenced to 30 years in prison over what she says was a stillbirth.

Teodora del Carmen Vasquez said she was working in 2007 when she began to experience intense pain, then bleeding. She called for help before fainting. As she came round, police officers surrounded her and accused her of murdering her baby by inducing an abortion of her nearly full-term baby.

Authorities charged Vasquez with aggravated murder and she was convicted in 2008. Her attorneys appealed her sentence, presenting testimony that the baby was born dead.

The court said it relied on the government autopsy’s conclusion that the girl was born alive and asphyxiated.

Human rights group Amnesty International called the decision a step back for justice.

El Salvador is one of four Latin American countries with total bans on abortion.

El Salvador court upholds 30-year jail sentence in stillbirth case

An El Salvador court has rejected the appeal of a woman sentenced to 30 years in prison over what she says was a stillbirth.

Teodora del Carmen Vasquez said she was working in 2007 when she began to experience intense pain, then bleeding. She called for help before fainting. As she came round, police officers surrounded her and accused her of murdering her baby by inducing an abortion of her nearly full-term baby.

Authorities charged Vasquez with aggravated murder and she was convicted in 2008. Her attorneys appealed her sentence, presenting testimony that the baby was born dead.

The court said it relied on the government autopsy’s conclusion that the girl was born alive and asphyxiated.

Human rights group Amnesty International called the decision a step back for justice.

El Salvador is one of four Latin American countries with total bans on abortion.