Tag Archives: Children

Cannabis drug cuts seizures in children with severe epilepsy in trial

A new drug derived from cannabis has been shown to reduce the convulsive seizures experienced by children with a severe form of epilepsy by nearly a half – and in a small number, stop them altogether.

Doctors involved in the trials say the drug could change the lives of thousands of children for whom there is little treatment, and might also help children and adults with more common forms of epilepsy.

Dravet syndrome, which affects one in 40,000 children in the UK, can cause life-threatening convulsions several times a day. The trial at Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London and centres in the US and Europe was launched because some parents desperate to help their children told of improvements after giving them cannabis derivatives bought on the internet.

“There was a lot of interest on the internet three to four years ago,” said Prof Helen Cross, a consultant in paediatric neurology at Great Ormond Street. That led to the trial of a carefully formulated pharmaceutical form of cannabidiol with virtually no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which is responsible for psychoactive effects.

“This is cannabidiol. It is not the oils that are available over the internet and the results cannot be ascribed to that,” she said. “Families should not be feeling this is something they should be able to get [for themselves]. This is a pharmaceutical product.”

The trial involved 120 children, aged two to 18, with an average age of nine. They were randomly assigned to take either cannabidiol in liquid form twice a day or a placebo. Neither the families nor the doctors knew which children were getting the active drug.

On average, the seizures experienced by the children were reduced by nearly 40% and 43% of those taking cannabidiol saw their seizures cut by half. Three children – 5% – stopped having seizures altogether. There were side-effects, which included drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhoea and reduced appetite – but these are similar to those caused by other epilepsy drugs.

The drug is not a cure, however. Cross said seizures returned in those who had stopped the drug. Children would probably be on the medication for life.

There is a need for more and better epilepsy drugs. A third of people with epilepsy do not respond to those that exist. Doctors think cannabidiol may work in at least some of those cases too, although the reason it works in the case of Dravet syndrome is unclear. “I have to say we don’t know,” said Cross. But asked whether it could be effective in other children and adults, she said, “Probably, yes.”

In young women, there has been concern over the drug sodium valproate, which can cause birth defects. Women and girls who may get pregnant are faced with deciding whether to stop taking a drug that may successfully keep their epilepsy under control.

Cross said cannabidiol may also prove to be an option for them, although trials would need to be done.

The results of the trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a commentary in the journal, Samuel Berkovic, from the Epilepsy Research Centre of the University of Melbourne, called medicinal cannabis “a hot-button issue in the treatment of epilepsy”, after anecdotal reports in the media of “spectacular results, coupled with the allure of using a ‘natural’ compound and long-held beliefs surrounding its recreational use”.

The trial was the beginning of solid evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy, but more research was needed, he said.

GW Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, will apply for a licence to the authorities in the US and Europe. If it is approved, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will have to assess the drug for cost-effectiveness before it can be used in the NHS.

Cannabis drug cuts seizures in children with severe epilepsy in trial

A new drug derived from cannabis has been shown to reduce the convulsive seizures experienced by children with a severe form of epilepsy by nearly a half – and in a small number, stop them altogether.

Doctors involved in the trials say the drug could change the lives of thousands of children for whom there is little treatment, and might also help children and adults with more common forms of epilepsy.

Dravet syndrome, which affects one in 40,000 children in the UK, can cause life-threatening convulsions several times a day. The trial at Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London and centres in the US and Europe was launched because some parents desperate to help their children told of improvements after giving them cannabis derivatives bought on the internet.

“There was a lot of interest on the internet three to four years ago,” said Prof Helen Cross, a consultant in paediatric neurology at Great Ormond Street. That led to the trial of a carefully formulated pharmaceutical form of cannabidiol with virtually no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which is responsible for psychoactive effects.

“This is cannabidiol. It is not the oils that are available over the internet and the results cannot be ascribed to that,” she said. “Families should not be feeling this is something they should be able to get [for themselves]. This is a pharmaceutical product.”

The trial involved 120 children, aged two to 18, with an average age of nine. They were randomly assigned to take either cannabidiol in liquid form twice a day or a placebo. Neither the families nor the doctors knew which children were getting the active drug.

On average, the seizures experienced by the children were reduced by nearly 40% and 43% of those taking cannabidiol saw their seizures cut by half. Three children – 5% – stopped having seizures altogether. There were side-effects, which included drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhoea and reduced appetite – but these are similar to those caused by other epilepsy drugs.

The drug is not a cure, however. Cross said seizures returned in those who had stopped the drug. Children would probably be on the medication for life.

There is a need for more and better epilepsy drugs. A third of people with epilepsy do not respond to those that exist. Doctors think cannabidiol may work in at least some of those cases too, although the reason it works in the case of Dravet syndrome is unclear. “I have to say we don’t know,” said Cross. But asked whether it could be effective in other children and adults, she said, “Probably, yes.”

In young women, there has been concern over the drug sodium valproate, which can cause birth defects. Women and girls who may get pregnant are faced with deciding whether to stop taking a drug that may successfully keep their epilepsy under control.

Cross said cannabidiol may also prove to be an option for them, although trials would need to be done.

The results of the trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a commentary in the journal, Samuel Berkovic, from the Epilepsy Research Centre of the University of Melbourne, called medicinal cannabis “a hot-button issue in the treatment of epilepsy”, after anecdotal reports in the media of “spectacular results, coupled with the allure of using a ‘natural’ compound and long-held beliefs surrounding its recreational use”.

The trial was the beginning of solid evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy, but more research was needed, he said.

GW Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, will apply for a licence to the authorities in the US and Europe. If it is approved, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will have to assess the drug for cost-effectiveness before it can be used in the NHS.

Cannabis drug cuts seizures in children with severe epilepsy in trial

A new drug derived from cannabis has been shown to reduce the convulsive seizures experienced by children with a severe form of epilepsy by nearly a half – and in a small number, stop them altogether.

Doctors involved in the trials say the drug could change the lives of thousands of children for whom there is little treatment, and might also help children and adults with more common forms of epilepsy.

Dravet syndrome, which affects one in 40,000 children in the UK, can cause life-threatening convulsions several times a day. The trial at Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London and centres in the US and Europe was launched because some parents desperate to help their children told of improvements after giving them cannabis derivatives bought on the internet.

“There was a lot of interest on the internet three to four years ago,” said Prof Helen Cross, a consultant in paediatric neurology at Great Ormond Street. That led to the trial of a carefully formulated pharmaceutical form of cannabidiol with virtually no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which is responsible for psychoactive effects.

“This is cannabidiol. It is not the oils that are available over the internet and the results cannot be ascribed to that,” she said. “Families should not be feeling this is something they should be able to get [for themselves]. This is a pharmaceutical product.”

The trial involved 120 children, aged two to 18, with an average age of nine. They were randomly assigned to take either cannabidiol in liquid form twice a day or a placebo. Neither the families nor the doctors knew which children were getting the active drug.

On average, the seizures experienced by the children were reduced by nearly 40% and 43% of those taking cannabidiol saw their seizures cut by half. Three children – 5% – stopped having seizures altogether. There were side-effects, which included drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhoea and reduced appetite – but these are similar to those caused by other epilepsy drugs.

The drug is not a cure, however. Cross said seizures returned in those who had stopped the drug. Children would probably be on the medication for life.

There is a need for more and better epilepsy drugs. A third of people with epilepsy do not respond to those that exist. Doctors think cannabidiol may work in at least some of those cases too, although the reason it works in the case of Dravet syndrome is unclear. “I have to say we don’t know,” said Cross. But asked whether it could be effective in other children and adults, she said, “Probably, yes.”

In young women, there has been concern over the drug sodium valproate, which can cause birth defects. Women and girls who may get pregnant are faced with deciding whether to stop taking a drug that may successfully keep their epilepsy under control.

Cross said cannabidiol may also prove to be an option for them, although trials would need to be done.

The results of the trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a commentary in the journal, Samuel Berkovic, from the Epilepsy Research Centre of the University of Melbourne, called medicinal cannabis “a hot-button issue in the treatment of epilepsy”, after anecdotal reports in the media of “spectacular results, coupled with the allure of using a ‘natural’ compound and long-held beliefs surrounding its recreational use”.

The trial was the beginning of solid evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy, but more research was needed, he said.

GW Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, will apply for a licence to the authorities in the US and Europe. If it is approved, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will have to assess the drug for cost-effectiveness before it can be used in the NHS.

Cannabis drug cuts seizures in children with severe epilepsy in trial

A new drug derived from cannabis has been shown to reduce the convulsive seizures experienced by children with a severe form of epilepsy by nearly a half – and in a small number, stop them altogether.

Doctors involved in the trials say the drug could change the lives of thousands of children for whom there is little treatment, and might also help children and adults with more common forms of epilepsy.

Dravet syndrome, which affects one in 40,000 children in the UK, can cause life-threatening convulsions several times a day. The trial at Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London and centres in the US and Europe was launched because some parents desperate to help their children told of improvements after giving them cannabis derivatives bought on the internet.

“There was a lot of interest on the internet three to four years ago,” said Prof Helen Cross, a consultant in paediatric neurology at Great Ormond Street. That led to the trial of a carefully formulated pharmaceutical form of cannabidiol with virtually no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which is responsible for psychoactive effects.

“This is cannabidiol. It is not the oils that are available over the internet and the results cannot be ascribed to that,” she said. “Families should not be feeling this is something they should be able to get [for themselves]. This is a pharmaceutical product.”

The trial involved 120 children, aged two to 18, with an average age of nine. They were randomly assigned to take either cannabidiol in liquid form twice a day or a placebo. Neither the families nor the doctors knew which children were getting the active drug.

On average, the seizures experienced by the children were reduced by nearly 40% and 43% of those taking cannabidiol saw their seizures cut by half. Three children – 5% – stopped having seizures altogether. There were side-effects, which included drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhoea and reduced appetite – but these are similar to those caused by other epilepsy drugs.

The drug is not a cure, however. Cross said seizures returned in those who had stopped the drug. Children would probably be on the medication for life.

There is a need for more and better epilepsy drugs. A third of people with epilepsy do not respond to those that exist. Doctors think cannabidiol may work in at least some of those cases too, although the reason it works in the case of Dravet syndrome is unclear. “I have to say we don’t know,” said Cross. But asked whether it could be effective in other children and adults, she said, “Probably, yes.”

In young women, there has been concern over the drug sodium valproate, which can cause birth defects. Women and girls who may get pregnant are faced with deciding whether to stop taking a drug that may successfully keep their epilepsy under control.

Cross said cannabidiol may also prove to be an option for them, although trials would need to be done.

The results of the trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a commentary in the journal, Samuel Berkovic, from the Epilepsy Research Centre of the University of Melbourne, called medicinal cannabis “a hot-button issue in the treatment of epilepsy”, after anecdotal reports in the media of “spectacular results, coupled with the allure of using a ‘natural’ compound and long-held beliefs surrounding its recreational use”.

The trial was the beginning of solid evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy, but more research was needed, he said.

GW Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, will apply for a licence to the authorities in the US and Europe. If it is approved, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will have to assess the drug for cost-effectiveness before it can be used in the NHS.

Cannabis drug cuts seizures in children with severe epilepsy in trial

A new drug derived from cannabis has been shown to reduce the convulsive seizures experienced by children with a severe form of epilepsy by nearly a half – and in a small number, stop them altogether.

Doctors involved in the trials say the drug could change the lives of thousands of children for whom there is little treatment, and might also help children and adults with more common forms of epilepsy.

Dravet syndrome, which affects one in 40,000 children in the UK, can cause life-threatening convulsions several times a day. The trial at Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London and centres in the US and Europe was launched because some parents desperate to help their children told of improvements after giving them cannabis derivatives bought on the internet.

“There was a lot of interest on the internet three to four years ago,” said Prof Helen Cross, a consultant in paediatric neurology at Great Ormond Street. That led to the trial of a carefully formulated pharmaceutical form of cannabidiol with virtually no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which is responsible for psychoactive effects.

“This is cannabidiol. It is not the oils that are available over the internet and the results cannot be ascribed to that,” she said. “Families should not be feeling this is something they should be able to get [for themselves]. This is a pharmaceutical product.”

The trial involved 120 children, aged two to 18, with an average age of nine. They were randomly assigned to take either cannabidiol in liquid form twice a day or a placebo. Neither the families nor the doctors knew which children were getting the active drug.

On average, the seizures experienced by the children were reduced by nearly 40% and 43% of those taking cannabidiol saw their seizures cut by half. Three children – 5% – stopped having seizures altogether. There were side-effects, which included drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhoea and reduced appetite – but these are similar to those caused by other epilepsy drugs.

The drug is not a cure, however. Cross said seizures returned in those who had stopped the drug. Children would probably be on the medication for life.

There is a need for more and better epilepsy drugs. A third of people with epilepsy do not respond to those that exist. Doctors think cannabidiol may work in at least some of those cases too, although the reason it works in the case of Dravet syndrome is unclear. “I have to say we don’t know,” said Cross. But asked whether it could be effective in other children and adults, she said, “Probably, yes.”

In young women, there has been concern over the drug sodium valproate, which can cause birth defects. Women and girls who may get pregnant are faced with deciding whether to stop taking a drug that may successfully keep their epilepsy under control.

Cross said cannabidiol may also prove to be an option for them, although trials would need to be done.

The results of the trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a commentary in the journal, Samuel Berkovic, from the Epilepsy Research Centre of the University of Melbourne, called medicinal cannabis “a hot-button issue in the treatment of epilepsy”, after anecdotal reports in the media of “spectacular results, coupled with the allure of using a ‘natural’ compound and long-held beliefs surrounding its recreational use”.

The trial was the beginning of solid evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy, but more research was needed, he said.

GW Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, will apply for a licence to the authorities in the US and Europe. If it is approved, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will have to assess the drug for cost-effectiveness before it can be used in the NHS.

Cannabis drug cuts seizures in children with severe epilepsy in trial

A new drug derived from cannabis has been shown to reduce the convulsive seizures experienced by children with a severe form of epilepsy by nearly a half – and in a small number, stop them altogether.

Doctors involved in the trials say the drug could change the lives of thousands of children for whom there is little treatment, and might also help children and adults with more common forms of epilepsy.

Dravet syndrome, which affects one in 40,000 children in the UK, can cause life-threatening convulsions several times a day. The trial at Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London and centres in the US and Europe was launched because some parents desperate to help their children told of improvements after giving them cannabis derivatives bought on the internet.

“There was a lot of interest on the internet three to four years ago,” said Prof Helen Cross, a consultant in paediatric neurology at Great Ormond Street. That led to the trial of a carefully formulated pharmaceutical form of cannabidiol with virtually no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which is responsible for psychoactive effects.

“This is cannabidiol. It is not the oils that are available over the internet and the results cannot be ascribed to that,” she said. “Families should not be feeling this is something they should be able to get [for themselves]. This is a pharmaceutical product.”

The trial involved 120 children, aged two to 18, with an average age of nine. They were randomly assigned to take either cannabidiol in liquid form twice a day or a placebo. Neither the families nor the doctors knew which children were getting the active drug.

On average, the seizures experienced by the children were reduced by nearly 40% and 43% of those taking cannabidiol saw their seizures cut by half. Three children – 5% – stopped having seizures altogether. There were side-effects, which included drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhoea and reduced appetite – but these are similar to those caused by other epilepsy drugs.

The drug is not a cure, however. Cross said seizures returned in those who had stopped the drug. Children would probably be on the medication for life.

There is a need for more and better epilepsy drugs. A third of people with epilepsy do not respond to those that exist. Doctors think cannabidiol may work in at least some of those cases too, although the reason it works in the case of Dravet syndrome is unclear. “I have to say we don’t know,” said Cross. But asked whether it could be effective in other children and adults, she said, “Probably, yes.”

In young women, there has been concern over the drug sodium valproate, which can cause birth defects. Women and girls who may get pregnant are faced with deciding whether to stop taking a drug that may successfully keep their epilepsy under control.

Cross said cannabidiol may also prove to be an option for them, although trials would need to be done.

The results of the trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a commentary in the journal, Samuel Berkovic, from the Epilepsy Research Centre of the University of Melbourne, called medicinal cannabis “a hot-button issue in the treatment of epilepsy”, after anecdotal reports in the media of “spectacular results, coupled with the allure of using a ‘natural’ compound and long-held beliefs surrounding its recreational use”.

The trial was the beginning of solid evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy, but more research was needed, he said.

GW Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, will apply for a licence to the authorities in the US and Europe. If it is approved, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will have to assess the drug for cost-effectiveness before it can be used in the NHS.

Cannabis drug cuts seizures in children with severe epilepsy in trial

A new drug derived from cannabis has been shown to reduce the convulsive seizures experienced by children with a severe form of epilepsy by nearly a half – and in a small number, stop them altogether.

Doctors involved in the trials say the drug could change the lives of thousands of children for whom there is little treatment, and might also help children and adults with more common forms of epilepsy.

Dravet syndrome, which affects one in 40,000 children in the UK, can cause life-threatening convulsions several times a day. The trial at Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London and centres in the US and Europe was launched because some parents desperate to help their children told of improvements after giving them cannabis derivatives bought on the internet.

“There was a lot of interest on the internet three to four years ago,” said Prof Helen Cross, a consultant in paediatric neurology at Great Ormond Street. That led to the trial of a carefully formulated pharmaceutical form of cannabidiol with virtually no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which is responsible for psychoactive effects.

“This is cannabidiol. It is not the oils that are available over the internet and the results cannot be ascribed to that,” she said. “Families should not be feeling this is something they should be able to get [for themselves]. This is a pharmaceutical product.”

The trial involved 120 children, aged two to 18, with an average age of nine. They were randomly assigned to take either cannabidiol in liquid form twice a day or a placebo. Neither the families nor the doctors knew which children were getting the active drug.

On average, the seizures experienced by the children were reduced by nearly 40% and 43% of those taking cannabidiol saw their seizures cut by half. Three children – 5% – stopped having seizures altogether. There were side-effects, which included drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhoea and reduced appetite – but these are similar to those caused by other epilepsy drugs.

The drug is not a cure, however. Cross said seizures returned in those who had stopped the drug. Children would probably be on the medication for life.

There is a need for more and better epilepsy drugs. A third of people with epilepsy do not respond to those that exist. Doctors think cannabidiol may work in at least some of those cases too, although the reason it works in the case of Dravet syndrome is unclear. “I have to say we don’t know,” said Cross. But asked whether it could be effective in other children and adults, she said, “Probably, yes.”

In young women, there has been concern over the drug sodium valproate, which can cause birth defects. Women and girls who may get pregnant are faced with deciding whether to stop taking a drug that may successfully keep their epilepsy under control.

Cross said cannabidiol may also prove to be an option for them, although trials would need to be done.

The results of the trial are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a commentary in the journal, Samuel Berkovic, from the Epilepsy Research Centre of the University of Melbourne, called medicinal cannabis “a hot-button issue in the treatment of epilepsy”, after anecdotal reports in the media of “spectacular results, coupled with the allure of using a ‘natural’ compound and long-held beliefs surrounding its recreational use”.

The trial was the beginning of solid evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy, but more research was needed, he said.

GW Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, will apply for a licence to the authorities in the US and Europe. If it is approved, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will have to assess the drug for cost-effectiveness before it can be used in the NHS.

If you have no children, who will care for you when you’re old? | Sonia Sodha

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We had to fight to get my grandfather good care. Those of us who don’t have children need a new approach

Few of us are immune from the anxiety that can quickly set in when we contemplate our own ageing. Who will be there for us when us can no longer physically take care of ourselves? Who will be around to remind us of who we were in our moments of lucidity when our minds have started slipping away?

For those of us who don’t have children, these questions take on a particular significance. I had mixed feelings after watching Still Alice, an Oscar-winning depiction of early-onset dementia. It made for grim viewing. But it was easy to imagine the ways it could have been even grimmer: what if the protagonist, Alice, had no children, a partner long departed or divorced, or friends who had drifted away?

Related: Why should older people rely on their families for care? | Catherine Bennett

Related: Mice benefit from research into cannabis. Why not us? | Simon Jenkins

Continue reading…

Children need to be in the right mental state to learn effectively | Tony Draper

There is a crisis in mental health for young people. Services are operating in silos and they are not working for over-tested, overstressed young people. Much emphasis has been placed on teenagers with low self-esteem, with behavioural and emotional issues and how we can support them.

At Water Hall primary school in Milton Keynes, we believe in the need to identify and address these issues early to be able to implement intervention strategies as soon as possible.

Taking action early enables vulnerable children to rebuild their self-esteem and take responsibility for their emotions, behaviour and learning. The outcome will be that they re-engage with education, perform well and are confident and happy young people.

Water Hall primary serves the Lakes Estate in Bletchley, a disadvantaged area where external issues regularly affect children’s mental and emotional wellbeing. The school has used the Kaleidoscope programme for eight years. The support system enables children to forget the things worrying them at home or elsewhere when they are in school.

Seven different stages make up a Kaleidoscope session: relax, visualise, express, move, build, explore and affirm. A designated room is used for sessions for either small groups or one-to-one sessions. Interventions last six to eight weeks.

The programme is used in all classes every day. Each morning starts with a session enabling children to be in the right frame of mind to learn. Lights are low, relaxing music is played and children are taught various calming techniques that they can use anywhere.

Kaleidoscope has had an amazing impact on the children’s emotional and mental wellbeing and their learning. Exclusions have fallen, attendance and behaviour has improved, children have taken responsibility for their learning and results have shot up. Kaleidoscope works, it gives children the tools to enable them to raise their self-esteem, with the accompanying improved outcomes for the school.

Our work proves that unless the child is in the right place emotionally and mentally, learning will not take place, however good the teaching and leadership in the school.

Tony Draper is headteacher of Water Hall primary, chief executive officer of Lakes Academies Trust, and the immediate past president of the school leaders’ union, the National Association of Head Teachers.

Poverty blighting health of many UK children, paediatricians warn

Poverty is seriously affecting the health of many British children, who are paying a heavy price as a result of housing, food and financial insecurity, paediatricians have warned.

A report from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) paints a bleak picture of the wellbeing of children in low-income households.

Among the problems cited by paediatricians are poor growth in children, whose parents cannot afford healthy food or to take them to medical appointments, respiratory illnesses being caused or exacerbated by cold, damp housing, and mental health problems resulting from financial stress.

Two in five of surveyed doctors said they had experienced difficulty discharging a child in the past six months because of concerns about housing or food insecurity.

Prof Russell Viner, RCPCH officer for health promotion, said its members were seeing problems that seemed to belong to a bygone era.

“Paediatricians around the country are telling us that poverty is affecting the health of children in a way we haven’t seen before,” he said.

“It’s an absolute wake-up call for our political parties that they really need to deliver on promises to make Britain a more equal society.

“The prime minister talked on her first day about the burning injustices in society and how she wants to change that and this chimes with that kind of focus.”

Latest figures show that 4 million children in the UK live in poverty and projections suggest that could rise to 5 million by 2020. In 2015, the Conservative government scrapped the target requiring the eradication of child poverty by the end of the decade. The decision was much-criticised at the time and the restoration of the target is one of the recommendations of the RCPCH and CPAG in their report, published on Thursday.

Only one respondent out of 266 paediatricians from 90 NHS trusts who completed the survey said poverty and low income did not contribute to the ill health of the children they work with, while more than two-thirds said it contributed “very much”. Almost half of doctors who responded said things were getting worse and only three believed they were improving.

Housing problems or homelessness were a concern for just under nine out of 10 respondents, with one London doctor commenting that “overcrowded, damp or unsuitable housing amongst our patients is the rule rather than the exception”.

Another paediatrician said that they had seen a number of babies unable to be discharged from the special care babies unit due to the parents being homeless. Four out of five doctors said an inability to keep warm at home contributed to ill health among children they treat.

More than three in five said food insecurity contributed very much to the ill health of children, with more than nine in 10 saying it had some impact. The inability to afford enough healthy food is associated both with poor growth of deprived babies and children on the one hand, and rising child obesity on the other.

One doctor who responded to the survey said the biggest impact of poverty on their patients was “insecurity, inferiority and stress. Through the biological and psychological factors these undoubtedly lead to poor health”.

More than nine in 10 paediatricians said financial stress and worry contributed to the ill health of children they work with.

The CPAG chief executive, Alison Garnham, said the resultsshould sound alarms for the next government. Low family incomes, inadequate housing and cuts to support services are jeopardising the health of our most vulnerable children.”

As well as restoring child poverty targets the report recommends that the next government reverses cuts to public health and universal credit, and examines the impact on child health of all prospective policies.

Viner stressed that the report did not aim to lay the blame for the problem at the door of one political party. “We need our children to be healthy, for the economy to be competitive, post-Brexit,” he said.

The shadow health secretary, Jonathan Ashworth, said child health inequality was a “national scandal”. He added: “Labour will bring down childhood obesity rates, improve early years’ services, enhance mental health provision and improve the state of all our children’s teeth.

“Our children deserve the best possible start in life and no child will be left behind under the next Labour government.”