Tag Archives: Drug

Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence

A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK.

Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy.

In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib was also shown to help women without a BRCA mutation to a lesser degree, doubling the length of time before recurrence.

The drug is now licensed for use in the UK but is yet to be assessed for free availability on the NHS.

Prof Jonathan Ledermann, from the University College London Cancer Institute, said: “Niraparib is the first treatment of its class licensed to delay the progression of ovarian cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of BRCA status.

“This represents a critical milestone in the management of ovarian cancer. Access to effective and tolerable medicines is sorely needed and the hope is that niraparib will be available in the NHS as quickly as possible.”

Ovarian cancer has been called a “silent killer” because it is often spotted late and at a deadly stage. Each year around 7,400 women in the UK are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 4,128 die from it. Roughly 85% of patients will experience recurrence after treatment.

Decisions about what drugs are offered to NHS patients in England and Wales follow the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which balances clinical and cost effectiveness. The Scottish Medicines Consortium provides similar guidelines in Scotland.

Katherine Taylor, chief executive of the charity Ovarian Cancer Action, said: “The outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer can be bleak. Current treatment lags behind other and better-known cancers and survival rates are low.

“Today’s news is an encouraging step in the right direction but we now need to ensure all UK women diagnosed with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer can benefit.

“We call upon the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium to approve this drug to provide more treatment options for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer. For many women this could be life-changing.”

Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence

A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK.

Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy.

In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib was also shown to help women without a BRCA mutation to a lesser degree, doubling the length of time before recurrence.

The drug is now licensed for use in the UK but is yet to be assessed for free availability on the NHS.

Prof Jonathan Ledermann, from the University College London Cancer Institute, said: “Niraparib is the first treatment of its class licensed to delay the progression of ovarian cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of BRCA status.

“This represents a critical milestone in the management of ovarian cancer. Access to effective and tolerable medicines is sorely needed and the hope is that niraparib will be available in the NHS as quickly as possible.”

Ovarian cancer has been called a “silent killer” because it is often spotted late and at a deadly stage. Each year around 7,400 women in the UK are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 4,128 die from it. Roughly 85% of patients will experience recurrence after treatment.

Decisions about what drugs are offered to NHS patients in England and Wales follow the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which balances clinical and cost effectiveness. The Scottish Medicines Consortium provides similar guidelines in Scotland.

Katherine Taylor, chief executive of the charity Ovarian Cancer Action, said: “The outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer can be bleak. Current treatment lags behind other and better-known cancers and survival rates are low.

“Today’s news is an encouraging step in the right direction but we now need to ensure all UK women diagnosed with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer can benefit.

“We call upon the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium to approve this drug to provide more treatment options for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer. For many women this could be life-changing.”

Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence

A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK.

Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy.

In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib was also shown to help women without a BRCA mutation to a lesser degree, doubling the length of time before recurrence.

The drug is now licensed for use in the UK but is yet to be assessed for free availability on the NHS.

Prof Jonathan Ledermann, from the University College London Cancer Institute, said: “Niraparib is the first treatment of its class licensed to delay the progression of ovarian cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of BRCA status.

“This represents a critical milestone in the management of ovarian cancer. Access to effective and tolerable medicines is sorely needed and the hope is that niraparib will be available in the NHS as quickly as possible.”

Ovarian cancer has been called a “silent killer” because it is often spotted late and at a deadly stage. Each year around 7,400 women in the UK are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 4,128 die from it. Roughly 85% of patients will experience recurrence after treatment.

Decisions about what drugs are offered to NHS patients in England and Wales follow the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which balances clinical and cost effectiveness. The Scottish Medicines Consortium provides similar guidelines in Scotland.

Katherine Taylor, chief executive of the charity Ovarian Cancer Action, said: “The outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer can be bleak. Current treatment lags behind other and better-known cancers and survival rates are low.

“Today’s news is an encouraging step in the right direction but we now need to ensure all UK women diagnosed with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer can benefit.

“We call upon the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium to approve this drug to provide more treatment options for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer. For many women this could be life-changing.”

Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence

A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK.

Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy.

In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib was also shown to help women without a BRCA mutation to a lesser degree, doubling the length of time before recurrence.

The drug is now licensed for use in the UK but is yet to be assessed for free availability on the NHS.

Prof Jonathan Ledermann, from the University College London Cancer Institute, said: “Niraparib is the first treatment of its class licensed to delay the progression of ovarian cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of BRCA status.

“This represents a critical milestone in the management of ovarian cancer. Access to effective and tolerable medicines is sorely needed and the hope is that niraparib will be available in the NHS as quickly as possible.”

Ovarian cancer has been called a “silent killer” because it is often spotted late and at a deadly stage. Each year around 7,400 women in the UK are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 4,128 die from it. Roughly 85% of patients will experience recurrence after treatment.

Decisions about what drugs are offered to NHS patients in England and Wales follow the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which balances clinical and cost effectiveness. The Scottish Medicines Consortium provides similar guidelines in Scotland.

Katherine Taylor, chief executive of the charity Ovarian Cancer Action, said: “The outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer can be bleak. Current treatment lags behind other and better-known cancers and survival rates are low.

“Today’s news is an encouraging step in the right direction but we now need to ensure all UK women diagnosed with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer can benefit.

“We call upon the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium to approve this drug to provide more treatment options for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer. For many women this could be life-changing.”

Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence

A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK.

Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy.

In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib was also shown to help women without a BRCA mutation to a lesser degree, doubling the length of time before recurrence.

The drug is now licensed for use in the UK but is yet to be assessed for free availability on the NHS.

Prof Jonathan Ledermann, from the University College London Cancer Institute, said: “Niraparib is the first treatment of its class licensed to delay the progression of ovarian cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of BRCA status.

“This represents a critical milestone in the management of ovarian cancer. Access to effective and tolerable medicines is sorely needed and the hope is that niraparib will be available in the NHS as quickly as possible.”

Ovarian cancer has been called a “silent killer” because it is often spotted late and at a deadly stage. Each year around 7,400 women in the UK are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 4,128 die from it. Roughly 85% of patients will experience recurrence after treatment.

Decisions about what drugs are offered to NHS patients in England and Wales follow the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which balances clinical and cost effectiveness. The Scottish Medicines Consortium provides similar guidelines in Scotland.

Katherine Taylor, chief executive of the charity Ovarian Cancer Action, said: “The outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer can be bleak. Current treatment lags behind other and better-known cancers and survival rates are low.

“Today’s news is an encouraging step in the right direction but we now need to ensure all UK women diagnosed with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer can benefit.

“We call upon the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium to approve this drug to provide more treatment options for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer. For many women this could be life-changing.”

Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence

A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK.

Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy.

In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib was also shown to help women without a BRCA mutation to a lesser degree, doubling the length of time before recurrence.

The drug is now licensed for use in the UK but is yet to be assessed for free availability on the NHS.

Prof Jonathan Ledermann, from the University College London Cancer Institute, said: “Niraparib is the first treatment of its class licensed to delay the progression of ovarian cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of BRCA status.

“This represents a critical milestone in the management of ovarian cancer. Access to effective and tolerable medicines is sorely needed and the hope is that niraparib will be available in the NHS as quickly as possible.”

Ovarian cancer has been called a “silent killer” because it is often spotted late and at a deadly stage. Each year around 7,400 women in the UK are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 4,128 die from it. Roughly 85% of patients will experience recurrence after treatment.

Decisions about what drugs are offered to NHS patients in England and Wales follow the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which balances clinical and cost effectiveness. The Scottish Medicines Consortium provides similar guidelines in Scotland.

Katherine Taylor, chief executive of the charity Ovarian Cancer Action, said: “The outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer can be bleak. Current treatment lags behind other and better-known cancers and survival rates are low.

“Today’s news is an encouraging step in the right direction but we now need to ensure all UK women diagnosed with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer can benefit.

“We call upon the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium to approve this drug to provide more treatment options for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer. For many women this could be life-changing.”

Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence

A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK.

Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy.

In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib was also shown to help women without a BRCA mutation to a lesser degree, doubling the length of time before recurrence.

The drug is now licensed for use in the UK but is yet to be assessed for free availability on the NHS.

Prof Jonathan Ledermann, from the University College London Cancer Institute, said: “Niraparib is the first treatment of its class licensed to delay the progression of ovarian cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of BRCA status.

“This represents a critical milestone in the management of ovarian cancer. Access to effective and tolerable medicines is sorely needed and the hope is that niraparib will be available in the NHS as quickly as possible.”

Ovarian cancer has been called a “silent killer” because it is often spotted late and at a deadly stage. Each year around 7,400 women in the UK are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 4,128 die from it. Roughly 85% of patients will experience recurrence after treatment.

Decisions about what drugs are offered to NHS patients in England and Wales follow the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, which balances clinical and cost effectiveness. The Scottish Medicines Consortium provides similar guidelines in Scotland.

Katherine Taylor, chief executive of the charity Ovarian Cancer Action, said: “The outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer can be bleak. Current treatment lags behind other and better-known cancers and survival rates are low.

“Today’s news is an encouraging step in the right direction but we now need to ensure all UK women diagnosed with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer can benefit.

“We call upon the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium to approve this drug to provide more treatment options for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer. For many women this could be life-changing.”

Kidney disease drug recommended by Nice ‘may do more harm than good’

The UK’s drug guidelines body is recommending a type of medication to treat chronic kidney disease despite no firm evidence that it benefits patients – and some signs that the drugs may do more harm than good, experts have warned.

Phosphate binders are commonly prescribed to lower blood phosphate levels in patients with advanced kidney disease, including those on dialysis. High phosphate has been linked to worse patient outcomes, including bone and muscle problems, a build-up of calcium in the blood vessels causing them to stiffen, and an increased death rate.

Experts say current recommendations by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice), which advocate the use of phosphate binders, are based on little evidence that they benefit patients.

“No one has ever shown that reducing [phosphate levels], in a trial, actually improves the wellbeing of the patients,” said Prof Phil Kalra, the national specialty lead for renal disorders at the National Institute for Health Research, pointing out that high phosphate levels might simply be a marker of other problems.

Moreover, there are concerns that calcium-based phosphate binders – which are the cheapest option and are recommended by Nice as the “first line” drugs – could do more harm than good. Research suggests that they could worsen the build-up of calcium in blood vessels, linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

According to NHS data seen by the Guardian, and backed up by figures available online, more than 167,000 prescription items for phosphate binders were dispensed in community in England in 2016 alone, amounting to a total cost of £9,442,845.86. Almost 70,000 of these were calcium-based.

“There are many of us who believe that there should be a trial to actually see if lowering phosphate per se, by whatever means, benefits the patient,” said Kalra, adding that studies should also consider the different types of drug. “There is a risk here [that] by thinking we still need to treat phosphate, and by following the Nice guidance, we may be doing more harm to some patients than if we left them alone,” he said, although Kalra stressed that patients currently taking such drugs should not stop their medication.

Newly updated guidelines from the global non-profit kidney foundation Kidney Disease – Improving Global Outcomes (Kdigo) reflect the lack of evidence, acknowledging there have not been enough trials on phosphate binders to make firm recommendations for their use. Instead, the team merely “suggest” that elevated phosphate levels be lowered, whether by diet or drugs, and similarly urge that the use of calcium-based phosphate binders be restricted.

David Wheeler, professor of kidney medicine at University College London and co-chair of Kdigo, said he did not think Nice’s recommendation of calcium-based phosphate binders as the first-line drug was based on evidence.

“My own view is that if non-calcium based binders were as cheap as calcium based binders, we would only be using non-calcium based binders,” he said.

But, Wheeler added, while non-calcium based phosphate binders are less likely to cause problems of calcium build-up in blood vessels, even for these drugs there is a dearth of evidence that they improve patient outcomes, and that clinical trials comparing the different types of drug with each other, and with a placebo, were crucial.

“I think there is an urgent need to address these questions,” he said, adding that trials to tackle the issues had suffered from a lack of funding.

Dr Richard Haynes, a consultant at Stoke Mandeville Renal Unit, agreed. “The short answer is no, we don’t have a robust evidence base at all to support what we are doing in terms of what the guidelines currently say,” he said. “The worst case scenario is that we are trying to intervene on something which is not important and by doing so we are causing harm,” he added. “There is no evidence to say that is definitely what is happening at the moment, but it does make me cautious.”

Dr Sankar Navaneethan, a co-author of a 2011 Cochrane review into phosphate binders, said that at least on the surface, the use of such drugs made sense: “The main biochemical marker that has been consistently associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality is serum phosphorus.”. However, he agreed that clinical trials were needed to explore whether the drugs do indeed benefit patients, but added that such trials might be hindered by ethical concerns – particularly for patients on dialysis.

Commenting on the current guidelines, a Nice spokesperson said: “In light of the available evidence the independent guideline committee on chronic kidney disease felt that, on balance, a recommendation for phosphate binders was more likely to have a beneficial effect than not.”

But, they added, Nice is currently in the process of reviewing the latest evidence for people with late stage chronic kidney disease, including those on dialysis, to explore whether phosphate binders are effective.

Is the NHS being taken for a ride on drug prices? We need to know | Nils Pratley

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has discovered a rich seam for inquiries – pharmaceutical companies allegedly gouging the National Health Service.

Pfizer, together with a small UK company called Flynn Pharma, was fined £90m last December for “excessive and unfair” pricing of an anti-epilepsy drug. GlaxoSmithKline and two small firms were later hit for £45m for conspiring to delay competition on an antidepressant.

Now comes an accusation that the Canadian firm Concordia Healthcare abused its dominant position to overcharge the NHS on a thyroid treatment. The price of the drug rose by almost 6,000% while production costs remained “broadly stable,” says the CMA.

The Concordia case is similar to the Pfizer one in that the price hikes followed the de-branding of a medicine. De-branding takes a drug into an unregulated pricing regime where competition from generic manufacturers is supposed to act as a brake on prices. In practice, competition doesn’t always arrive – thus a pack of Concordia’s liothyronine tablets rose from £4.46 before de-branding in 2007 to £258 by July this year.

The government has tried to address the problem by creating powers to control prices of generic medicines. But the open question is how severely the system has been abused. The CMA says its investigators are pursuing another seven cases involving several companies, which may suggest a pricing loophole has been quietly exploited for years.

The CMA is doing its bit, but there is a strong case for a wider investigation that looks beyond the narrow application of competition and consumer-protection laws. As it is, NHS England’s response felt limp – the CMA’s action “sends an important enforcement signal … that taxpayers and the NHS will not tolerate market abuses,” it said.

Well, yes, signals are important. But taxpayers and patients also want to know if the NHS has been taken for a ride on generics, whether officials are wiser to pricing games and whether the new law is up to the job. There is scope for a parliamentary inquiry. And, since the companies all shout about their ethical codes of conduct, they would surely be happy to be questioned in detail about how they deal with the NHS.

McCall will face more turbulence at ITV than easyJet

Dame Carolyn McCall, chief executive of easyJet, won’t regret her decision to quit to become ITV’s boss in the new year. She’s had seven mostly successful years at the airline and few executives get to lead two FTSE 100 household names. All the same, the medium-term job looks easier at the firm she’s leaving than the one she’s joining.

EasyJet’s full-year profits were knocked, as they were bound to be, by a £101m hit from the fall of sterling. But £408m, down from £494m, was a decent result. The European short-haul airline market was going through one its regular bouts of over-expansion and ticket prices fell. The position is now reversing – and quickly. Monarch and Air Berlin have gone bust, Alitalia is on its knees and Ryanair has cancelled a few winter flights while it hunts for pilots. Fares will rise for the first time in almost two years.

Air Berlin’s downfall has also allowed easyJet to bag 25 A320s plus landing slots in Tegel airport in Berlin on the cheap. The reorganisation costs are more severe – £60m of losses in year one plus £100m in one-off costs – but enhancement to earnings is promised in year two. In time, it’s possible that a similar attractive slice could be carved out of Alitalia. In short, the competitive landscape looks clearer than it has done in ages. McCall always boasted that easyJet is a “structural winner” – it rings true.

It’s harder to say the same about ITV on current form. The broadcaster has a near-monopoly on free-to-air commercial TV advertising slots in the UK – a useful structural advantage – but it is completing a second year of falling advertising revenues and the spectre of Netflix looms. ITV, even after a 25% fall in its share price this year, is still the bigger company in stock market terms – £6bn versus easyJet’s £5bn – but McCall will have done well if there’s still a £1bn gap seven years from now.

Did TCI go too far in its feud over Rolet?

The Children’s Investment Fund (TCI), the hedge fund seeking to oust Donald Brydon as chairman of the London Stock Exchange, should be careful not to overplay its hand. It asked a fair question – why is LSE chief executive Xavier Rolet leaving? And it called an meeting of shareholders to vote on Brydon’s survival, as is its right as a 5% shareholder.

But to accuse the LSE of threatening a character assassination of Rolet is bizarre. TCI called the meeting and the company has to issue a circular to shareholders. Brydon & co should have spoken up at the outset, of course, but they’re still allowed to give their side of the story.

Is the NHS being taken for a ride on drug prices? We need to know | Nils Pratley

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has discovered a rich seam for inquiries – pharmaceutical companies allegedly gouging the National Health Service.

Pfizer, together with a small UK company called Flynn Pharma, was fined £90m last December for “excessive and unfair” pricing of an anti-epilepsy drug. GlaxoSmithKline and two small firms were later hit for £45m for conspiring to delay competition on an antidepressant.

Now comes an accusation that the Canadian firm Concordia Healthcare abused its dominant position to overcharge the NHS on a thyroid treatment. The price of the drug rose by almost 6,000% while production costs remained “broadly stable,” says the CMA.

The Concordia case is similar to the Pfizer one in that the price hikes followed the de-branding of a medicine. De-branding takes a drug into an unregulated pricing regime where competition from generic manufacturers is supposed to act as a brake on prices. In practice, competition doesn’t always arrive – thus a pack of Concordia’s liothyronine tablets rose from £4.46 before de-branding in 2007 to £258 by July this year.

The government has tried to address the problem by creating powers to control prices of generic medicines. But the open question is how severely the system has been abused. The CMA says its investigators are pursuing another seven cases involving several companies, which may suggest a pricing loophole has been quietly exploited for years.

The CMA is doing its bit, but there is a strong case for a wider investigation that looks beyond the narrow application of competition and consumer-protection laws. As it is, NHS England’s response felt limp – the CMA’s action “sends an important enforcement signal … that taxpayers and the NHS will not tolerate market abuses,” it said.

Well, yes, signals are important. But taxpayers and patients also want to know if the NHS has been taken for a ride on generics, whether officials are wiser to pricing games and whether the new law is up to the job. There is scope for a parliamentary inquiry. And, since the companies all shout about their ethical codes of conduct, they would surely be happy to be questioned in detail about how they deal with the NHS.

McCall will face more turbulence at ITV than easyJet

Dame Carolyn McCall, chief executive of easyJet, won’t regret her decision to quit to become ITV’s boss in the new year. She’s had seven mostly successful years at the airline and few executives get to lead two FTSE 100 household names. All the same, the medium-term job looks easier at the firm she’s leaving than the one she’s joining.

EasyJet’s full-year profits were knocked, as they were bound to be, by a £101m hit from the fall of sterling. But £408m, down from £494m, was a decent result. The European short-haul airline market was going through one its regular bouts of over-expansion and ticket prices fell. The position is now reversing – and quickly. Monarch and Air Berlin have gone bust, Alitalia is on its knees and Ryanair has cancelled a few winter flights while it hunts for pilots. Fares will rise for the first time in almost two years.

Air Berlin’s downfall has also allowed easyJet to bag 25 A320s plus landing slots in Tegel airport in Berlin on the cheap. The reorganisation costs are more severe – £60m of losses in year one plus £100m in one-off costs – but enhancement to earnings is promised in year two. In time, it’s possible that a similar attractive slice could be carved out of Alitalia. In short, the competitive landscape looks clearer than it has done in ages. McCall always boasted that easyJet is a “structural winner” – it rings true.

It’s harder to say the same about ITV on current form. The broadcaster has a near-monopoly on free-to-air commercial TV advertising slots in the UK – a useful structural advantage – but it is completing a second year of falling advertising revenues and the spectre of Netflix looms. ITV, even after a 25% fall in its share price this year, is still the bigger company in stock market terms – £6bn versus easyJet’s £5bn – but McCall will have done well if there’s still a £1bn gap seven years from now.

Did TCI go too far in its feud over Rolet?

The Children’s Investment Fund (TCI), the hedge fund seeking to oust Donald Brydon as chairman of the London Stock Exchange, should be careful not to overplay its hand. It asked a fair question – why is LSE chief executive Xavier Rolet leaving? And it called an meeting of shareholders to vote on Brydon’s survival, as is its right as a 5% shareholder.

But to accuse the LSE of threatening a character assassination of Rolet is bizarre. TCI called the meeting and the company has to issue a circular to shareholders. Brydon & co should have spoken up at the outset, of course, but they’re still allowed to give their side of the story.