Tag Archives: finds

Warning drinkers of cancer risk could reduce consumption, survey finds

Labels warning drinkers that they risk seven different forms of cancer could make some people re-think their alcohol consumption, according to a survey.

But most people will ignore other warnings on bottles and drinks about the damaging effects of alcohol on health, the survey found.

The annual Global Drugs Survey, which 130,000 people in 44 countries chose to complete online this year, asks about drug and alcohol use, risks and harms. Researchers said that given the success of graphic images on cigarette packets, they wanted to investigate the potential impact of warnings on bottles of wine, beer and spirits among the 3,600 survey responders in England.

They devised seven different health warnings, in collaboration with health experts, from “heart disease is a major cause of death among people with heavy alcohol use” to “a bottle of wine or six bottles of beer contain as many calories as a burger and fries”.

Other warnings concerned liver disease, the increase in violence among drinkers, the increased cancer risk, the recommendation from experts to have at least two alcohol-free days a week and the absence of any health benefits from drinking, even at low levels.

Most people said they believed the messages – nearly 90% believed alcohol could lead to violence and 80% knew there were a lot of calories in alcoholic drinks. And yet most would not rethink the amount they drank if any of those warning labels were on bottles.

The warning that appeared to reach the most people was that “drinking less reduces your risk of seven different sorts of cancer”. Among the 3,600 people in England who responded to the survey, 40% said it would or might affect the amount they drank, 5% said they were unsure and 55% said it would not change anything.

Warnings about calories would or might change the habits of 31% of people and warnings that alcohol increases violent and abusive behaviour would or might make 27% of people cut down.

Drinks manufacturers already have to put the alcohol levels and the chief medical officer’s recommended alcohol limits on their products. A report from the Alcohol Health Alliance in January found that most did not include the up to date guidance of 14 units a week for men and women. They found that none had health warnings featuring specific illnesses or recommending drink-free days.

Professor Adam Winstock, consultant psychiatrist and addiction medicine specialist and founder of the Global Drug Survey said it showed that there was much to do about alcohol messaging in the UK. “It is clear that the link between alcohol consumption and increased cancer risk is a message that is still not reaching UK drinkers and where it does, many chose to react to the message with scepticism.

‘’The alcohol industry which makes profits from selling its product will never embrace anything that might lead to people drinking less. A self-regulated industry will always regulate to optimise profits not public health.’’

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance, said: “These results on the potential power of health information on alcohol labels are important and compelling. They make it clear that people just do not know about key health issues like the link between alcohol and cancer that might well change their behaviour and improve public health.”

Warning drinkers of cancer risk could reduce consumption, survey finds

Labels warning drinkers that they risk seven different forms of cancer could make some people re-think their alcohol consumption, according to a survey.

But most people will ignore other warnings on bottles and drinks about the damaging effects of alcohol on health, the survey found.

The annual Global Drugs Survey, which 130,000 people in 44 countries chose to complete online this year, asks about drug and alcohol use, risks and harms. Researchers said that given the success of graphic images on cigarette packets, they wanted to investigate the potential impact of warnings on bottles of wine, beer and spirits among the 3,600 survey responders in England.

They devised seven different health warnings, in collaboration with health experts, from “heart disease is a major cause of death among people with heavy alcohol use” to “a bottle of wine or six bottles of beer contain as many calories as a burger and fries”.

Other warnings concerned liver disease, the increase in violence among drinkers, the increased cancer risk, the recommendation from experts to have at least two alcohol-free days a week and the absence of any health benefits from drinking, even at low levels.

Most people said they believed the messages – nearly 90% believed alcohol could lead to violence and 80% knew there were a lot of calories in alcoholic drinks. And yet most would not rethink the amount they drank if any of those warning labels were on bottles.

The warning that appeared to reach the most people was that “drinking less reduces your risk of seven different sorts of cancer”. Among the 3,600 people in England who responded to the survey, 40% said it would or might affect the amount they drank, 5% said they were unsure and 55% said it would not change anything.

Warnings about calories would or might change the habits of 31% of people and warnings that alcohol increases violent and abusive behaviour would or might make 27% of people cut down.

Drinks manufacturers already have to put the alcohol levels and the chief medical officer’s recommended alcohol limits on their products. A report from the Alcohol Health Alliance in January found that most did not include the up to date guidance of 14 units a week for men and women. They found that none had health warnings featuring specific illnesses or recommending drink-free days.

Professor Adam Winstock, consultant psychiatrist and addiction medicine specialist and founder of the Global Drug Survey said it showed that there was much to do about alcohol messaging in the UK. “It is clear that the link between alcohol consumption and increased cancer risk is a message that is still not reaching UK drinkers and where it does, many chose to react to the message with scepticism.

‘’The alcohol industry which makes profits from selling its product will never embrace anything that might lead to people drinking less. A self-regulated industry will always regulate to optimise profits not public health.’’

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance, said: “These results on the potential power of health information on alcohol labels are important and compelling. They make it clear that people just do not know about key health issues like the link between alcohol and cancer that might well change their behaviour and improve public health.”

Protests outside abortion clinics surged in 2017, report finds

America’s abortion clinics experienced a major upsurge in trespassing, obstruction and blockades by anti-abortion activists in 2017, according to an annual survey by an industry group.

The National Abortion Federation report chronicled a litany of actions that ranged from coordinated trespassing efforts by abortion opponents, repeated brick-throwing at windows of a Cleveland clinic and an attempted bombing in Illinois.

The report found that there was an overall decrease in acts of vandalism against clinics but a significant increase in activities aimed at disrupting services and intimidating patients and providers. Acts of trespassing increased from 247 in 2016 to 823 in 2017, instances of obstruction tripled to 1,704 and threats of death or other harm nearly doubled to 62.

“The protesters are feeling emboldened by the political environment and seeing what they could get away with,” said the federation’s president, Vicki Saporta. “They want to make it more difficult to provide care, without going to very extreme forms of violence.”

The federation based its findings on monthly reports filed by its members who make up the vast majority of abortion clinics nationally.

At least 10 people were arrested last May when anti-abortion activists blocked the entrance to the EMW Women’s Surgical Center in Louisville, Kentucky – the last abortion clinic still operating in the state.

Elsewhere, several trespassing arrests occurred during coordinated actions by anti-abortion protesters in Virginia, Michigan and other states. Activists entered clinics, conveyed their anti-abortion views to patients, and refused to leave when told to do so by law enforcement.

Citizens for a Pro-Life Society, a group headed by Roman Catholic theology professor Monica Migliorino Miller, described the incursions as “an act of nonviolent defense of unborn children about to be aborted”. Miller was among those arrested in Michigan, and in February was convicted of trespassing.

The one attempted bombing in 2017 involved a pipe bomb that did not explode after being placed in an abortion clinic in Champaign, Illinois, in November. The three men charged by federal authorities are allegedly part of a militia group called the “White Rabbits” who also have been charged in the bombing of a Minnesota mosque last year.

A clinic in Cleveland incurred more than $ 32,000 in damages because of repeated brick-throwing attacks on its windows.

The report does not include a violent case in February when, according to prosecutors, a Massachusetts man deliberately crashed a stolen truck into a Planned Parenthood clinic in New Jersey, injuring three people, including a pregnant woman. That was the first major violent attack on a US abortion clinic since 2015, when a man killed three people at a Planned Parenthood clinic during a shooting attack in Colorado.

The picketing in 2017 often was more aggressive than in recent years, according to the Feminist Majority Foundation, which operates a national clinic access program.
“They’re telling us they’ve never seen this level of intensity,” said the foundation’s executive director, Kathy Spillar.

The threat of attacks and vandalism can significantly boost clinics’ costs, notably to provide security for facilities and staff. Some clinics have faced extra legal costs challenging state laws aimed at restricting abortions.

Last week, the Iowa governor, Kim Reynolds, signed one of the country’s most restrictive abortion abortion bills into law. The so-called “heartbeat” law bans abortions once a fetal heartbeat has been detected, which is about six weeks and can be before a woman even knows she is pregnant. It is almost certain to face a stiff legal challenge.

In part, because of legal and financial challenges, the number of abortion clinics in the US has been declining. As of 2014, when the last comprehensive tally was made, there were 788 clinics.

Protests outside abortion clinics surged in 2017, report finds

America’s abortion clinics experienced a major upsurge in trespassing, obstruction and blockades by anti-abortion activists in 2017, according to an annual survey by an industry group.

The National Abortion Federation report chronicled a litany of actions that ranged from coordinated trespassing efforts by abortion opponents, repeated brick-throwing at windows of a Cleveland clinic and an attempted bombing in Illinois.

The report found that there was an overall decrease in acts of vandalism against clinics but a significant increase in activities aimed at disrupting services and intimidating patients and providers. Acts of trespassing increased from 247 in 2016 to 823 in 2017, instances of obstruction tripled to 1,704 and threats of death or other harm nearly doubled to 62.

“The protesters are feeling emboldened by the political environment and seeing what they could get away with,” said the federation’s president, Vicki Saporta. “They want to make it more difficult to provide care, without going to very extreme forms of violence.”

The federation based its findings on monthly reports filed by its members who make up the vast majority of abortion clinics nationally.

At least 10 people were arrested last May when anti-abortion activists blocked the entrance to the EMW Women’s Surgical Center in Louisville, Kentucky – the last abortion clinic still operating in the state.

Elsewhere, several trespassing arrests occurred during coordinated actions by anti-abortion protesters in Virginia, Michigan and other states. Activists entered clinics, conveyed their anti-abortion views to patients, and refused to leave when told to do so by law enforcement.

Citizens for a Pro-Life Society, a group headed by Roman Catholic theology professor Monica Migliorino Miller, described the incursions as “an act of nonviolent defense of unborn children about to be aborted”. Miller was among those arrested in Michigan, and in February was convicted of trespassing.

The one attempted bombing in 2017 involved a pipe bomb that did not explode after being placed in an abortion clinic in Champaign, Illinois, in November. The three men charged by federal authorities are allegedly part of a militia group called the “White Rabbits” who also have been charged in the bombing of a Minnesota mosque last year.

A clinic in Cleveland incurred more than $ 32,000 in damages because of repeated brick-throwing attacks on its windows.

The report does not include a violent case in February when, according to prosecutors, a Massachusetts man deliberately crashed a stolen truck into a Planned Parenthood clinic in New Jersey, injuring three people, including a pregnant woman. That was the first major violent attack on a US abortion clinic since 2015, when a man killed three people at a Planned Parenthood clinic during a shooting attack in Colorado.

The picketing in 2017 often was more aggressive than in recent years, according to the Feminist Majority Foundation, which operates a national clinic access program.
“They’re telling us they’ve never seen this level of intensity,” said the foundation’s executive director, Kathy Spillar.

The threat of attacks and vandalism can significantly boost clinics’ costs, notably to provide security for facilities and staff. Some clinics have faced extra legal costs challenging state laws aimed at restricting abortions.

Last week, the Iowa governor, Kim Reynolds, signed one of the country’s most restrictive abortion abortion bills into law. The so-called “heartbeat” law bans abortions once a fetal heartbeat has been detected, which is about six weeks and can be before a woman even knows she is pregnant. It is almost certain to face a stiff legal challenge.

In part, because of legal and financial challenges, the number of abortion clinics in the US has been declining. As of 2014, when the last comprehensive tally was made, there were 788 clinics.

Report finds ‘serious issues’ with use of Mental Health Act

People with serious mental illness are suffering neglect and discrimination when they have been detained for treatment, according to a report ordered by Theresa May.

Too many of those sectioned under the Mental Health Act receive a lack of dignity and respect from staff, according to the review of legislation, which has identified a series of problems with it.

“People with the most severe forms of mental illness have the greatest needs and continue to be the most neglected and discriminated against”, said Prof Sir Simon Wessely, who chaired the review.

The prime minister commissioned the inquiry into the operation of the act after she vowed during last year’s election campaign to “rip up” what she called “flawed” legislation that was leading to too many people being locked up. The “discriminatory use of a law passed more than three decades ago” is a key reason why May sees inadequate provision of mental health care as one of the “burning injustices”.

Wessely, a former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, has found that disproportionate numbers of black people are being sectioned and have the worst experience while in detention.

His interim report states: “Experience of people from black African and Caribbean heritage are particularly poor and they are detained more than any other group. Too often this can result in police becoming involved at time of crisis. The causes of this disparity are complex.”

There were almost 64,000 detentions in England in 2016, 9% more than the year before. Numbers have risen 47% since 2005-06, leading to concern that too many people were being sectioned. Psychiatrists section people they judge to be a risk to themselves or others. Detainees are often suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or a personality disorder.

Many people interviewed by Wessely’s team believe that being detained was the best thing for them; some said it saved their life and prevented suicide. However, an almost equal number of people did not believe detention had been the right approach for them.

“We have heard time and time again service users raise serious issues about the manner in which they were previously detained under the MHA and the circumstances of their stay in hospital,” the report said.

Recent research by Rethink Mental Illness found that many people who had been sectioned “felt imprisoned [and] not cared for, because they had minimal involvement in their care and their choices were disregarded … [and felt] a complete loss of any sense of control over their lives”.

Danielle Hamm, the charity’s associate director of campaigns and policy, said: “This landmark review confirms what we have long known: that there are serious problems with the Mental Health Act. Those severely affected by mental illness, such as people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, who are more likely to be held under the act, have been dramatically underserved.”

Prof Wendy Burn, the president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Changing legislation alone isn’t enough to improve the lives of people with mental illness, and the report rightly recognises this. Improving mental health services depends on the right number of well-trained staff and the right resources to meet the needs of patients, their families and carers.”

Report finds ‘serious issues’ with use of Mental Health Act

People with serious mental illness are suffering neglect and discrimination when they have been detained for treatment, according to a report ordered by Theresa May.

Too many of those sectioned under the Mental Health Act receive a lack of dignity and respect from staff, according to the review of legislation, which has identified a series of problems with it.

“People with the most severe forms of mental illness have the greatest needs and continue to be the most neglected and discriminated against”, said Prof Sir Simon Wessely, who chaired the review.

The prime minister commissioned the inquiry into the operation of the act after she vowed during last year’s election campaign to “rip up” what she called “flawed” legislation that was leading to too many people being locked up. The “discriminatory use of a law passed more than three decades ago” is a key reason why May sees inadequate provision of mental health care as one of the “burning injustices”.

Wessely, a former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, has found that disproportionate numbers of black people are being sectioned and have the worst experience while in detention.

His interim report states: “Experience of people from black African and Caribbean heritage are particularly poor and they are detained more than any other group. Too often this can result in police becoming involved at time of crisis. The causes of this disparity are complex.”

There were almost 64,000 detentions in England in 2016, 9% more than the year before. Numbers have risen 47% since 2005-06, leading to concern that too many people were being sectioned. Psychiatrists section people they judge to be a risk to themselves or others. Detainees are often suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or a personality disorder.

Many people interviewed by Wessely’s team believe that being detained was the best thing for them; some said it saved their life and prevented suicide. However, an almost equal number of people did not believe detention had been the right approach for them.

“We have heard time and time again service users raise serious issues about the manner in which they were previously detained under the MHA and the circumstances of their stay in hospital,” the report said.

Recent research by Rethink Mental Illness found that many people who had been sectioned “felt imprisoned [and] not cared for, because they had minimal involvement in their care and their choices were disregarded … [and felt] a complete loss of any sense of control over their lives”.

Danielle Hamm, the charity’s associate director of campaigns and policy, said: “This landmark review confirms what we have long known: that there are serious problems with the Mental Health Act. Those severely affected by mental illness, such as people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, who are more likely to be held under the act, have been dramatically underserved.”

Prof Wendy Burn, the president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Changing legislation alone isn’t enough to improve the lives of people with mental illness, and the report rightly recognises this. Improving mental health services depends on the right number of well-trained staff and the right resources to meet the needs of patients, their families and carers.”

Report finds ‘serious issues’ with use of Mental Health Act

People with serious mental illness are suffering neglect and discrimination when they have been detained for treatment, according to a report ordered by Theresa May.

Too many of those sectioned under the Mental Health Act receive a lack of dignity and respect from staff, according to the review of legislation, which has identified a series of problems with it.

“People with the most severe forms of mental illness have the greatest needs and continue to be the most neglected and discriminated against”, said Prof Sir Simon Wessely, who chaired the review.

The prime minister commissioned the inquiry into the operation of the act after she vowed during last year’s election campaign to “rip up” what she called “flawed” legislation that was leading to too many people being locked up. The “discriminatory use of a law passed more than three decades ago” is a key reason why May sees inadequate provision of mental health care as one of the “burning injustices”.

Wessely, a former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, has found that disproportionate numbers of black people are being sectioned and have the worst experience while in detention.

His interim report states: “Experience of people from black African and Caribbean heritage are particularly poor and they are detained more than any other group. Too often this can result in police becoming involved at time of crisis. The causes of this disparity are complex.”

There were almost 64,000 detentions in England in 2016, 9% more than the year before. Numbers have risen 47% since 2005-06, leading to concern that too many people were being sectioned. Psychiatrists section people they judge to be a risk to themselves or others. Detainees are often suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or a personality disorder.

Many people interviewed by Wessely’s team believe that being detained was the best thing for them; some said it saved their life and prevented suicide. However, an almost equal number of people did not believe detention had been the right approach for them.

“We have heard time and time again service users raise serious issues about the manner in which they were previously detained under the MHA and the circumstances of their stay in hospital,” the report said.

Recent research by Rethink Mental Illness found that many people who had been sectioned “felt imprisoned [and] not cared for, because they had minimal involvement in their care and their choices were disregarded … [and felt] a complete loss of any sense of control over their lives”.

Danielle Hamm, the charity’s associate director of campaigns and policy, said: “This landmark review confirms what we have long known: that there are serious problems with the Mental Health Act. Those severely affected by mental illness, such as people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, who are more likely to be held under the act, have been dramatically underserved.”

Prof Wendy Burn, the president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Changing legislation alone isn’t enough to improve the lives of people with mental illness, and the report rightly recognises this. Improving mental health services depends on the right number of well-trained staff and the right resources to meet the needs of patients, their families and carers.”

Report finds ‘serious issues’ with use of Mental Health Act

People with serious mental illness are suffering neglect and discrimination when they have been detained for treatment, according to a report ordered by Theresa May.

Too many of those sectioned under the Mental Health Act receive a lack of dignity and respect from staff, according to the review of legislation, which has identified a series of problems with it.

“People with the most severe forms of mental illness have the greatest needs and continue to be the most neglected and discriminated against”, said Prof Sir Simon Wessely, who chaired the review.

The prime minister commissioned the inquiry into the operation of the act after she vowed during last year’s election campaign to “rip up” what she called “flawed” legislation that was leading to too many people being locked up. The “discriminatory use of a law passed more than three decades ago” is a key reason why May sees inadequate provision of mental health care as one of the “burning injustices”.

Wessely, a former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, has found that disproportionate numbers of black people are being sectioned and have the worst experience while in detention.

His interim report states: “Experience of people from black African and Caribbean heritage are particularly poor and they are detained more than any other group. Too often this can result in police becoming involved at time of crisis. The causes of this disparity are complex.”

There were almost 64,000 detentions in England in 2016, 9% more than the year before. Numbers have risen 47% since 2005-06, leading to concern that too many people were being sectioned. Psychiatrists section people they judge to be a risk to themselves or others. Detainees are often suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or a personality disorder.

Many people interviewed by Wessely’s team believe that being detained was the best thing for them; some said it saved their life and prevented suicide. However, an almost equal number of people did not believe detention had been the right approach for them.

“We have heard time and time again service users raise serious issues about the manner in which they were previously detained under the MHA and the circumstances of their stay in hospital,” the report said.

Recent research by Rethink Mental Illness found that many people who had been sectioned “felt imprisoned [and] not cared for, because they had minimal involvement in their care and their choices were disregarded … [and felt] a complete loss of any sense of control over their lives”.

Danielle Hamm, the charity’s associate director of campaigns and policy, said: “This landmark review confirms what we have long known: that there are serious problems with the Mental Health Act. Those severely affected by mental illness, such as people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, who are more likely to be held under the act, have been dramatically underserved.”

Prof Wendy Burn, the president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Changing legislation alone isn’t enough to improve the lives of people with mental illness, and the report rightly recognises this. Improving mental health services depends on the right number of well-trained staff and the right resources to meet the needs of patients, their families and carers.”

Report finds ‘serious issues’ with use of Mental Health Act

People with serious mental illness are suffering neglect and discrimination when they have been detained for treatment, according to a report ordered by Theresa May.

Too many of those sectioned under the Mental Health Act receive a lack of dignity and respect from staff, according to the review of legislation, which has identified a series of problems with it.

“People with the most severe forms of mental illness have the greatest needs and continue to be the most neglected and discriminated against”, said Prof Sir Simon Wessely, who chaired the review.

The prime minister commissioned the inquiry into the operation of the act after she vowed during last year’s election campaign to “rip up” what she called “flawed” legislation that was leading to too many people being locked up. The “discriminatory use of a law passed more than three decades ago” is a key reason why May sees inadequate provision of mental health care as one of the “burning injustices”.

Wessely, a former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, has found that disproportionate numbers of black people are being sectioned and have the worst experience while in detention.

His interim report states: “Experience of people from black African and Caribbean heritage are particularly poor and they are detained more than any other group. Too often this can result in police becoming involved at time of crisis. The causes of this disparity are complex.”

There were almost 64,000 detentions in England in 2016, 9% more than the year before. Numbers have risen 47% since 2005-06, leading to concern that too many people were being sectioned. Psychiatrists section people they judge to be a risk to themselves or others. Detainees are often suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or a personality disorder.

Many people interviewed by Wessely’s team believe that being detained was the best thing for them; some said it saved their life and prevented suicide. However, an almost equal number of people did not believe detention had been the right approach for them.

“We have heard time and time again service users raise serious issues about the manner in which they were previously detained under the MHA and the circumstances of their stay in hospital,” the report said.

Recent research by Rethink Mental Illness found that many people who had been sectioned “felt imprisoned [and] not cared for, because they had minimal involvement in their care and their choices were disregarded … [and felt] a complete loss of any sense of control over their lives”.

Danielle Hamm, the charity’s associate director of campaigns and policy, said: “This landmark review confirms what we have long known: that there are serious problems with the Mental Health Act. Those severely affected by mental illness, such as people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, who are more likely to be held under the act, have been dramatically underserved.”

Prof Wendy Burn, the president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Changing legislation alone isn’t enough to improve the lives of people with mental illness, and the report rightly recognises this. Improving mental health services depends on the right number of well-trained staff and the right resources to meet the needs of patients, their families and carers.”

Report finds ‘serious issues’ with use of Mental Health Act

People with serious mental illness are suffering neglect and discrimination when they have been detained for treatment, according to a report ordered by Theresa May.

Too many of those sectioned under the Mental Health Act receive a lack of dignity and respect from staff, according to the review of legislation, which has identified a series of problems with it.

“People with the most severe forms of mental illness have the greatest needs and continue to be the most neglected and discriminated against”, said Prof Sir Simon Wessely, who chaired the review.

The prime minister commissioned the inquiry into the operation of the act after she vowed during last year’s election campaign to “rip up” what she called “flawed” legislation that was leading to too many people being locked up. The “discriminatory use of a law passed more than three decades ago” is a key reason why May sees inadequate provision of mental health care as one of the “burning injustices”.

Wessely, a former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, has found that disproportionate numbers of black people are being sectioned and have the worst experience while in detention.

His interim report states: “Experience of people from black African and Caribbean heritage are particularly poor and they are detained more than any other group. Too often this can result in police becoming involved at time of crisis. The causes of this disparity are complex.”

There were almost 64,000 detentions in England in 2016, 9% more than the year before. Numbers have risen 47% since 2005-06, leading to concern that too many people were being sectioned. Psychiatrists section people they judge to be a risk to themselves or others. Detainees are often suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or a personality disorder.

Many people interviewed by Wessely’s team believe that being detained was the best thing for them; some said it saved their life and prevented suicide. However, an almost equal number of people did not believe detention had been the right approach for them.

“We have heard time and time again service users raise serious issues about the manner in which they were previously detained under the MHA and the circumstances of their stay in hospital,” the report said.

Recent research by Rethink Mental Illness found that many people who had been sectioned “felt imprisoned [and] not cared for, because they had minimal involvement in their care and their choices were disregarded … [and felt] a complete loss of any sense of control over their lives”.

Danielle Hamm, the charity’s associate director of campaigns and policy, said: “This landmark review confirms what we have long known: that there are serious problems with the Mental Health Act. Those severely affected by mental illness, such as people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, who are more likely to be held under the act, have been dramatically underserved.”

Prof Wendy Burn, the president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Changing legislation alone isn’t enough to improve the lives of people with mental illness, and the report rightly recognises this. Improving mental health services depends on the right number of well-trained staff and the right resources to meet the needs of patients, their families and carers.”