Tag Archives: Government

Government to relax immigration rules on overseas doctors

Thousands more overseas doctors will be able to come and work in the NHS after Theresa May heeded pleas from cabinet colleagues to scrap limits that hospital bosses had criticised as “absolutely barmy”.

The relaxation of immigration rules, which is due to be announced imminently, represents a victory for Jeremy Hunt and Sajid Javid and follows a vociferous campaign by NHS organisations and medical groups.

They have been arguing that medics should be taken out of the cap on skilled workers allowed to work in Britain, in order to help tackle the NHS’s deepening workforce crisis.

Hunt, the health and social care secretary, and Javid, the home secretary, have been privately lobbying the prime minister to ease restrictions that between November and April denied more than 2,300 doctors from outside the European Economic Area the chance to work in the NHS.

Under the current immigration system the number of non-EEA skilled workers of all sorts able to come and work in Britain on a tier-2 visa through a certificate of sponsorship is capped at 20,700 a year – a ceiling set by the Home Office.

However, the government has decided that the NHS’s need for more doctors is so great that they should be treated differently, well-placed sources have told the Guardian. The rethink should mean that doctors are no longer left unable to take up job offers from hospitals and GP surgeries because they cannot get a visa.

There will now be a separate system to decide which medics come.

Recent official figures show that the NHS in England alone is short of 9,982 doctors. Those refused tier-2 visas in recent months have included GPs, psychiatrists and cancer specialists, all of which have a significant number of vacancies.

Hospitals have said their inability to recruit doctors from outside the EEA would lead to patients facing longer waiting times for treatment and hit patient safety.

Andrew Foster, chief executive of the Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS hospital trust recently condemned the “bonkers decision” to ban doctors whom the NHS desperately needed. “It’s absolutely barmy that one branch of government is trying to increase the capacity of the NHS and another branch is stopping it from doing so”, he said.

“Last year we got 60 doctors and we had no trouble with visas. This year, [during] the first two months we were denied all visas and in the latest round we have been successful in less than 10 cases out of the 100 [they had applied for].”

Hospitals have been unable to hire doctors they had identified as highly skilled and necessary recruits because the cap on the number of professionals given a visa has been reached in each of the last seven months.

The Home Office had made clear that if the rules were to change so they would operate differently in the third quarter of the year, which includes August, when newly-qualified young doctors start their NHS training, any relaxation of the policy had to be agreed by the end of this week.

It is unclear if nurses will also be taken out of the cap system. They are already classed as a shortage occupation by the Home Office’s migration advisory committee. As such some nurses have been deemed a greater priority than doctors in recent months when officials have been deciding who will get tier-2 visas.

Hunt has argued that doctors and nurses should be treated differently to other skilled migrants on a temporary basis, until increases in the numbers of homegrown staff he has instigated produce more British NHS staff.

“If reports that the cap will be lifted for doctors are true, it will be a welcome relief to trusts in addressing immediate staff shortages, to help ensure safe, high quality care,” said Saffron Cordery, deputy chief executive of NHS Providers, which represents NHS trusts in England.

“These visa restrictions have been a major obstacle to recruiting much-needed medical staff. For trusts it has resulted in unfilled vacancies, often filled by paying premium locum rates. For doctors, they may have given up on working in the NHS and decided to work in another country.”

Government to relax immigration rules on overseas doctors

Thousands more overseas doctors will be able to come and work in the NHS after Theresa May heeded pleas from cabinet colleagues to scrap limits that hospital bosses had criticised as “absolutely barmy”.

The relaxation of immigration rules, which is due to be announced imminently, represents a victory for Jeremy Hunt and Sajid Javid and follows a vociferous campaign by NHS organisations and medical groups.

They have been arguing that medics should be taken out of the cap on skilled workers allowed to work in Britain, in order to help tackle the NHS’s deepening workforce crisis.

Hunt, the health and social care secretary, and Javid, the home secretary, have been privately lobbying the prime minister to ease restrictions that between November and April denied more than 2,300 doctors from outside the European Economic Area the chance to work in the NHS.

Under the current immigration system the number of non-EEA skilled workers of all sorts able to come and work in Britain on a tier-2 visa through a certificate of sponsorship is capped at 20,700 a year – a ceiling set by the Home Office.

However, the government has decided that the NHS’s need for more doctors is so great that they should be treated differently, well-placed sources have told the Guardian. The rethink should mean that doctors are no longer left unable to take up job offers from hospitals and GP surgeries because they cannot get a visa.

There will now be a separate system to decide which medics come.

Recent official figures show that the NHS in England alone is short of 9,982 doctors. Those refused tier-2 visas in recent months have included GPs, psychiatrists and cancer specialists, all of which have a significant number of vacancies.

Hospitals have said their inability to recruit doctors from outside the EEA would lead to patients facing longer waiting times for treatment and hit patient safety.

Andrew Foster, chief executive of the Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS hospital trust recently condemned the “bonkers decision” to ban doctors whom the NHS desperately needed. “It’s absolutely barmy that one branch of government is trying to increase the capacity of the NHS and another branch is stopping it from doing so”, he said.

“Last year we got 60 doctors and we had no trouble with visas. This year, [during] the first two months we were denied all visas and in the latest round we have been successful in less than 10 cases out of the 100 [they had applied for].”

Hospitals have been unable to hire doctors they had identified as highly skilled and necessary recruits because the cap on the number of professionals given a visa has been reached in each of the last seven months.

The Home Office had made clear that if the rules were to change so they would operate differently in the third quarter of the year, which includes August, when newly-qualified young doctors start their NHS training, any relaxation of the policy had to be agreed by the end of this week.

It is unclear if nurses will also be taken out of the cap system. They are already classed as a shortage occupation by the Home Office’s migration advisory committee. As such some nurses have been deemed a greater priority than doctors in recent months when officials have been deciding who will get tier-2 visas.

Hunt has argued that doctors and nurses should be treated differently to other skilled migrants on a temporary basis, until increases in the numbers of homegrown staff he has instigated produce more British NHS staff.

“If reports that the cap will be lifted for doctors are true, it will be a welcome relief to trusts in addressing immediate staff shortages, to help ensure safe, high quality care,” said Saffron Cordery, deputy chief executive of NHS Providers, which represents NHS trusts in England.

“These visa restrictions have been a major obstacle to recruiting much-needed medical staff. For trusts it has resulted in unfilled vacancies, often filled by paying premium locum rates. For doctors, they may have given up on working in the NHS and decided to work in another country.”

Government to relax immigration rules on overseas doctors

Thousands more overseas doctors will be able to come and work in the NHS after Theresa May heeded pleas from cabinet colleagues to scrap limits that hospital bosses had criticised as “absolutely barmy”.

The relaxation of immigration rules, which is due to be announced imminently, represents a victory for Jeremy Hunt and Sajid Javid and follows a vociferous campaign by NHS organisations and medical groups.

They have been arguing that medics should be taken out of the cap on skilled workers allowed to work in Britain, in order to help tackle the NHS’s deepening workforce crisis.

Hunt, the health and social care secretary, and Javid, the home secretary, have been privately lobbying the prime minister to ease restrictions that between November and April denied more than 2,300 doctors from outside the European Economic Area the chance to work in the NHS.

Under the current immigration system the number of non-EEA skilled workers of all sorts able to come and work in Britain on a tier-2 visa through a certificate of sponsorship is capped at 20,700 a year – a ceiling set by the Home Office.

However, the government has decided that the NHS’s need for more doctors is so great that they should be treated differently, well-placed sources have told the Guardian. The rethink should mean that doctors are no longer left unable to take up job offers from hospitals and GP surgeries because they cannot get a visa.

There will now be a separate system to decide which medics come.

Recent official figures show that the NHS in England alone is short of 9,982 doctors. Those refused tier-2 visas in recent months have included GPs, psychiatrists and cancer specialists, all of which have a significant number of vacancies.

Hospitals have said their inability to recruit doctors from outside the EEA would lead to patients facing longer waiting times for treatment and hit patient safety.

Andrew Foster, chief executive of the Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS hospital trust recently condemned the “bonkers decision” to ban doctors whom the NHS desperately needed. “It’s absolutely barmy that one branch of government is trying to increase the capacity of the NHS and another branch is stopping it from doing so”, he said.

“Last year we got 60 doctors and we had no trouble with visas. This year, [during] the first two months we were denied all visas and in the latest round we have been successful in less than 10 cases out of the 100 [they had applied for].”

Hospitals have been unable to hire doctors they had identified as highly skilled and necessary recruits because the cap on the number of professionals given a visa has been reached in each of the last seven months.

The Home Office had made clear that if the rules were to change so they would operate differently in the third quarter of the year, which includes August, when newly-qualified young doctors start their NHS training, any relaxation of the policy had to be agreed by the end of this week.

It is unclear if nurses will also be taken out of the cap system. They are already classed as a shortage occupation by the Home Office’s migration advisory committee. As such some nurses have been deemed a greater priority than doctors in recent months when officials have been deciding who will get tier-2 visas.

Hunt has argued that doctors and nurses should be treated differently to other skilled migrants on a temporary basis, until increases in the numbers of homegrown staff he has instigated produce more British NHS staff.

“If reports that the cap will be lifted for doctors are true, it will be a welcome relief to trusts in addressing immediate staff shortages, to help ensure safe, high quality care,” said Saffron Cordery, deputy chief executive of NHS Providers, which represents NHS trusts in England.

“These visa restrictions have been a major obstacle to recruiting much-needed medical staff. For trusts it has resulted in unfilled vacancies, often filled by paying premium locum rates. For doctors, they may have given up on working in the NHS and decided to work in another country.”

Government to relax immigration rules on overseas doctors

Thousands more overseas doctors will be able to come and work in the NHS after Theresa May heeded pleas from cabinet colleagues to scrap limits that hospital bosses had criticised as “absolutely barmy”.

The relaxation of immigration rules, which is due to be announced imminently, represents a victory for Jeremy Hunt and Sajid Javid and follows a vociferous campaign by NHS organisations and medical groups.

They have been arguing that medics should be taken out of the cap on skilled workers allowed to work in Britain, in order to help tackle the NHS’s deepening workforce crisis.

Hunt, the health and social care secretary, and Javid, the home secretary, have been privately lobbying the prime minister to ease restrictions that between November and April denied more than 2,300 doctors from outside the European Economic Area the chance to work in the NHS.

Under the current immigration system the number of non-EEA skilled workers of all sorts able to come and work in Britain on a tier-2 visa through a certificate of sponsorship is capped at 20,700 a year – a ceiling set by the Home Office.

However, the government has decided that the NHS’s need for more doctors is so great that they should be treated differently, well-placed sources have told the Guardian. The rethink should mean that doctors are no longer left unable to take up job offers from hospitals and GP surgeries because they cannot get a visa.

There will now be a separate system to decide which medics come.

Recent official figures show that the NHS in England alone is short of 9,982 doctors. Those refused tier-2 visas in recent months have included GPs, psychiatrists and cancer specialists, all of which have a significant number of vacancies.

Hospitals have said their inability to recruit doctors from outside the EEA would lead to patients facing longer waiting times for treatment and hit patient safety.

Andrew Foster, chief executive of the Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS hospital trust recently condemned the “bonkers decision” to ban doctors whom the NHS desperately needed. “It’s absolutely barmy that one branch of government is trying to increase the capacity of the NHS and another branch is stopping it from doing so”, he said.

“Last year we got 60 doctors and we had no trouble with visas. This year, [during] the first two months we were denied all visas and in the latest round we have been successful in less than 10 cases out of the 100 [they had applied for].”

Hospitals have been unable to hire doctors they had identified as highly skilled and necessary recruits because the cap on the number of professionals given a visa has been reached in each of the last seven months.

The Home Office had made clear that if the rules were to change so they would operate differently in the third quarter of the year, which includes August, when newly-qualified young doctors start their NHS training, any relaxation of the policy had to be agreed by the end of this week.

It is unclear if nurses will also be taken out of the cap system. They are already classed as a shortage occupation by the Home Office’s migration advisory committee. As such some nurses have been deemed a greater priority than doctors in recent months when officials have been deciding who will get tier-2 visas.

Hunt has argued that doctors and nurses should be treated differently to other skilled migrants on a temporary basis, until increases in the numbers of homegrown staff he has instigated produce more British NHS staff.

“If reports that the cap will be lifted for doctors are true, it will be a welcome relief to trusts in addressing immediate staff shortages, to help ensure safe, high quality care,” said Saffron Cordery, deputy chief executive of NHS Providers, which represents NHS trusts in England.

“These visa restrictions have been a major obstacle to recruiting much-needed medical staff. For trusts it has resulted in unfilled vacancies, often filled by paying premium locum rates. For doctors, they may have given up on working in the NHS and decided to work in another country.”

Government to relax immigration rules on overseas doctors

Thousands more overseas doctors will be able to come and work in the NHS after Theresa May heeded pleas from cabinet colleagues to scrap limits that hospital bosses had criticised as “absolutely barmy”.

The relaxation of immigration rules, which is due to be announced imminently, represents a victory for Jeremy Hunt and Sajid Javid and follows a vociferous campaign by NHS organisations and medical groups.

They have been arguing that medics should be taken out of the cap on skilled workers allowed to work in Britain, in order to help tackle the NHS’s deepening workforce crisis.

Hunt, the health and social care secretary, and Javid, the home secretary, have been privately lobbying the prime minister to ease restrictions that between November and April denied more than 2,300 doctors from outside the European Economic Area the chance to work in the NHS.

Under the current immigration system the number of non-EEA skilled workers of all sorts able to come and work in Britain on a tier-2 visa through a certificate of sponsorship is capped at 20,700 a year – a ceiling set by the Home Office.

However, the government has decided that the NHS’s need for more doctors is so great that they should be treated differently, well-placed sources have told the Guardian. The rethink should mean that doctors are no longer left unable to take up job offers from hospitals and GP surgeries because they cannot get a visa.

There will now be a separate system to decide which medics come.

Recent official figures show that the NHS in England alone is short of 9,982 doctors. Those refused tier-2 visas in recent months have included GPs, psychiatrists and cancer specialists, all of which have a significant number of vacancies.

Hospitals have said their inability to recruit doctors from outside the EEA would lead to patients facing longer waiting times for treatment and hit patient safety.

Andrew Foster, chief executive of the Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS hospital trust recently condemned the “bonkers decision” to ban doctors whom the NHS desperately needed. “It’s absolutely barmy that one branch of government is trying to increase the capacity of the NHS and another branch is stopping it from doing so”, he said.

“Last year we got 60 doctors and we had no trouble with visas. This year, [during] the first two months we were denied all visas and in the latest round we have been successful in less than 10 cases out of the 100 [they had applied for].”

Hospitals have been unable to hire doctors they had identified as highly skilled and necessary recruits because the cap on the number of professionals given a visa has been reached in each of the last seven months.

The Home Office had made clear that if the rules were to change so they would operate differently in the third quarter of the year, which includes August, when newly-qualified young doctors start their NHS training, any relaxation of the policy had to be agreed by the end of this week.

It is unclear if nurses will also be taken out of the cap system. They are already classed as a shortage occupation by the Home Office’s migration advisory committee. As such some nurses have been deemed a greater priority than doctors in recent months when officials have been deciding who will get tier-2 visas.

Hunt has argued that doctors and nurses should be treated differently to other skilled migrants on a temporary basis, until increases in the numbers of homegrown staff he has instigated produce more British NHS staff.

“If reports that the cap will be lifted for doctors are true, it will be a welcome relief to trusts in addressing immediate staff shortages, to help ensure safe, high quality care,” said Saffron Cordery, deputy chief executive of NHS Providers, which represents NHS trusts in England.

“These visa restrictions have been a major obstacle to recruiting much-needed medical staff. For trusts it has resulted in unfilled vacancies, often filled by paying premium locum rates. For doctors, they may have given up on working in the NHS and decided to work in another country.”

Government plans to tackle mental health crisis ‘will fail a generation’

Government plans to tackle the mental health crisis among young people will fail a generation who desperately need help, two committees of MPs warn today.

Proposals in a green paper to “transform” NHS mental health care for young people through maximum four-week waiting times to access help and improved support in schools will take too long to effect real change, the committees say.

In a joint report, the Commons health and social care and education select committees criticise the plans as unambitious and inadequate given the fast-rising need for care and too reliant on already overworked teachers.

“This strategy does not go far enough, which raises the very real prospect of hundreds of thousands of children missing out on getting the help they so desperately need,” said Rob Halfon, the Conservative chair of the latter committee and former education minister.

Although ministers have pledged to introduce maximum waiting times is only to be made available across up to a quarter of England by 2022-23.

“The suggested speed of delivery will leave hundreds of thousands of children with no improvements in provision for several years and with possibly worsened provision if staff leave to join trailblazer areas elsewhere,” the report says.

Children’s charities, mental health groups, teaching unions and health organisations have endorsed the committees’ findings.

Mary Bousted, the joint general secretary of the National Education Union, said: “The crisis in child mental health provision will not be ‘transformed’ by the unambitious proposals in the government’s green paper. A government that’s complacent about child poverty and relaxed about excessive testing in schools can’t claim to care about young people’s mental health.”

At least 10% of children and young people are thought to suffer from anxiety, depression, self-harm, eating disorders or other mental health conditions. The numbers of under-18s seeking and receiving NHS care have soared over the last decade. But only a quarter who need help get it, according to Public Health England .

Javed Khan, the chief executive of Barnardo’s, said: “The government risks missing a golden opportunity to radically transform a failing mental health system. Despite Theresa May describing it as a ‘burning injustice’ that required a new approach from government, we now find ourselves sleep-walking into a deepening mental health crisis.”

The government’s plans are based on three key elements: a teacher at every school and college becoming its designated lead for mental health; help for schools from new mental health support teams; and the guarantees of help within four weeks.

However, the report adds: “The proposals put more pressure on the teaching workforce without sufficient resources.”

It highlights the negative impact of social media on young people’s mental wellbeing and suggests that pupils should be taught about the benefits and risks of social media as part of the school curriculum.

Jeremy Hunt, the health and social care secretary, last month claimed that social media companies’s alleged failure to enact safeguards to control young people’s access was “morally wrong” and “unfair on parents”.

Government plans to tackle mental health crisis ‘will fail a generation’

Government plans to tackle the mental health crisis among young people will fail a generation who desperately need help, two committees of MPs warn today.

Proposals in a green paper to “transform” NHS mental health care for young people through maximum four-week waiting times to access help and improved support in schools will take too long to effect real change, the committees say.

In a joint report, the Commons health and social care and education select committees criticise the plans as unambitious and inadequate given the fast-rising need for care and too reliant on already overworked teachers.

“This strategy does not go far enough, which raises the very real prospect of hundreds of thousands of children missing out on getting the help they so desperately need,” said Rob Halfon, the Conservative chair of the latter committee and former education minister.

Although ministers have pledged to introduce maximum waiting times is only to be made available across up to a quarter of England by 2022-23.

“The suggested speed of delivery will leave hundreds of thousands of children with no improvements in provision for several years and with possibly worsened provision if staff leave to join trailblazer areas elsewhere,” the report says.

Children’s charities, mental health groups, teaching unions and health organisations have endorsed the committees’ findings.

Mary Bousted, the joint general secretary of the National Education Union, said: “The crisis in child mental health provision will not be ‘transformed’ by the unambitious proposals in the government’s green paper. A government that’s complacent about child poverty and relaxed about excessive testing in schools can’t claim to care about young people’s mental health.”

At least 10% of children and young people are thought to suffer from anxiety, depression, self-harm, eating disorders or other mental health conditions. The numbers of under-18s seeking and receiving NHS care have soared over the last decade. But only a quarter who need help get it, according to Public Health England .

Javed Khan, the chief executive of Barnardo’s, said: “The government risks missing a golden opportunity to radically transform a failing mental health system. Despite Theresa May describing it as a ‘burning injustice’ that required a new approach from government, we now find ourselves sleep-walking into a deepening mental health crisis.”

The government’s plans are based on three key elements: a teacher at every school and college becoming its designated lead for mental health; help for schools from new mental health support teams; and the guarantees of help within four weeks.

However, the report adds: “The proposals put more pressure on the teaching workforce without sufficient resources.”

It highlights the negative impact of social media on young people’s mental wellbeing and suggests that pupils should be taught about the benefits and risks of social media as part of the school curriculum.

Jeremy Hunt, the health and social care secretary, last month claimed that social media companies’s alleged failure to enact safeguards to control young people’s access was “morally wrong” and “unfair on parents”.

Government plans to tackle mental health crisis ‘will fail a generation’

Government plans to tackle the mental health crisis among young people will fail a generation who desperately need help, two committees of MPs warn today.

Proposals in a green paper to “transform” NHS mental health care for young people through maximum four-week waiting times to access help and improved support in schools will take too long to effect real change, the committees say.

In a joint report, the Commons health and social care and education select committees criticise the plans as unambitious and inadequate given the fast-rising need for care and too reliant on already overworked teachers.

“This strategy does not go far enough, which raises the very real prospect of hundreds of thousands of children missing out on getting the help they so desperately need,” said Rob Halfon, the Conservative chair of the latter committee and former education minister.

Although ministers have pledged to introduce maximum waiting times is only to be made available across up to a quarter of England by 2022-23.

“The suggested speed of delivery will leave hundreds of thousands of children with no improvements in provision for several years and with possibly worsened provision if staff leave to join trailblazer areas elsewhere,” the report says.

Children’s charities, mental health groups, teaching unions and health organisations have endorsed the committees’ findings.

Mary Bousted, the joint general secretary of the National Education Union, said: “The crisis in child mental health provision will not be ‘transformed’ by the unambitious proposals in the government’s green paper. A government that’s complacent about child poverty and relaxed about excessive testing in schools can’t claim to care about young people’s mental health.”

At least 10% of children and young people are thought to suffer from anxiety, depression, self-harm, eating disorders or other mental health conditions. The numbers of under-18s seeking and receiving NHS care have soared over the last decade. But only a quarter who need help get it, according to Public Health England .

Javed Khan, the chief executive of Barnardo’s, said: “The government risks missing a golden opportunity to radically transform a failing mental health system. Despite Theresa May describing it as a ‘burning injustice’ that required a new approach from government, we now find ourselves sleep-walking into a deepening mental health crisis.”

The government’s plans are based on three key elements: a teacher at every school and college becoming its designated lead for mental health; help for schools from new mental health support teams; and the guarantees of help within four weeks.

However, the report adds: “The proposals put more pressure on the teaching workforce without sufficient resources.”

It highlights the negative impact of social media on young people’s mental wellbeing and suggests that pupils should be taught about the benefits and risks of social media as part of the school curriculum.

Jeremy Hunt, the health and social care secretary, last month claimed that social media companies’s alleged failure to enact safeguards to control young people’s access was “morally wrong” and “unfair on parents”.

I work in child mental health – government plans will fail many who need help | Robin Barker

I never dreamed of becoming a mental health nurse and working in child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs). I was a youth worker, a Connexions adviser supporting young people’s mental health without referrals or thresholds and my office was the local park, schools, colleges and community centres.

The introduction of austerity and the funding cuts that followed in 2008 left me out of a job and in need of a new profession. After retraining as a mental health nurse, I returned to the same work but with an NHS employer and saw those cuts follow me into Camhs. They have been difficult times to manage both professionally and personally; when less money means you can deliver less of a service, the impact is felt not only by the young people and their families not getting support, damage is also wrought on relationships with local communities, schools, colleges and GPs.

Ten years later, there is growing recognition that the system needs help. The mental health outcomes of children and young people continue to decline and the system supporting their emotional wellbeing is more fragmented than ever before. Children and young people are in more need but less support is available both from NHS Camhs and voluntary organisations that play a vital role in providing information, advice and guidance. Schools and colleges are also struggling to meet their pupils’ educational and emotional needs. It’s for these reasons I welcome the consultation on the government green paper focused on transforming children and young people’s mental health provision, which is open until midday on 2 March.

The main themes of the green paper – improving emotional and mental health support in schools, increasing access to early intervention, advice and guidance and improving access to specialist help – are hard to argue with. These are some of the areas where the need and evidence suggests we could have the greatest impact.

The government’s proposals in the green paper to address these areas are to incentivise every school and college to identify a senior lead for mental health; to create mental health support teams focused on early intervention with their work supervised by Camhs and jointly managed with education; and trial a four-week waiting time for access to Camhs.

While I agree with the sentiment behind these proposals, I question the feasibility. NHS Camhs are only funded to meet 25% of the estimated need with that expected to raise to 33% by 2020-21. Introducing a waiting time before we have the workforce, service models or security that further funding is making its way to frontline will further damage the public’s view of Camhs, which will have to raise thresholds to access care – meaning only the most serious cases will get help – or fail to deliver. Many children who need help won’t be able to get Money has failed to make its way into the children and young people’s mental health system – most recently the £1.4bn over five years announced in 2015.

I wish these proposals went further to encourage a whole school approach to mental and emotional health; having a single person responsible for mental health risks reducing an amazing vision to a set of responsibilities added to an already overburdened member of teaching staff, without the protected time or authority to lead systemic change. Change should ensure children, young people and their parents and carers are involved in the mental health system.

When I dream of what the children and young people’s mental health system and my profession could look like in 10 years’ time, I see all these possibilities: closer links with education, early intervention and a four-week – or even no-week – waiting time for specialist support. I’m just not sure we’ve captured the vision in the green paper as it is.

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NHS deficit and staff shortage data ‘held up’ by government

The NHS’s financial regulator has delayed publishing new information about the health service’s serious shortages of both money and staff after lobbying by the government, the Guardian can reveal.

The figures show that the NHS’s finances are even worse than previously thought – and include new official figures that reveal for the first time the full extent of the health service’s widespread lack of doctors and nurses.

NHS Improvement (NHSI) was originally due to make its latest quarterly assessment of the NHS in England’s performance available on Monday 19 February. However, it later said the report would be delayed but did not explain the hold-up.

The document is now set to be published on Wednesday after a 48-hour delay that senior NHS sources with knowledge of the situation said was linked to interventions by Jeremy Hunt’s Department of Health and Social Care.

NHSI’s findings are likely to prompt renewed criticism of the Conservatives’ handling of the NHS. They will show that NHS trusts that care for patients in England are now expected to end 2018-19 about £900m in deficit – far more than the £500m original target that ministers and NHS bosses hoped hospitals would stick to.

That is more than the £791m deficit that the NHS provider sector recorded last year and will provoke fresh claims that the government is giving the service too little money to do its job properly. Hospitals have ended up deeper in the red than expected because they recently missed out on over £100m of income as a result of NHS England’s unprecedented cancellation of an estimated 50,000 planned operations this winter. They have also had to spend money hiring extra staff and opening overflow wards to cope with demand since December.

Critics say that the true overshoot is closer to £1.3bn as the £900m figure does not include £350m of emergency funding to cope with the extra demand for care over this winter that Philip Hammond provided in the budget last November.

Labour accused ministers of trying to “cover up evidence of their failures” on the NHS. “It‘s a huge worry that NHS Improvement’s regular update on NHS finances has been postponed from Monday,” said shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth.

“The half-year report was already predicting a year-end deficit of £623m so people will be worrying about how much worse things have got and why it’s being covered up like this.”

The report will also set out, for the first time, the NHS’s own estimate of the number of vacancies it has. That is based on information supplied by trusts for how many doctors, nurses and every other type of staff they were short of in December. The NHS, health charities and medical and patient groups have been warning that the sheer number of rota gaps is putting patient safety and quality of care at risk.

Prof Anita Charlesworth, director of research and economics at the Health Foundation thinktank, said: “It is not surprising that the huge pressures on the health service at the end of last year, which saw the percentage of A&E patients treated within four hours fall to its lowest level ever in December, have also hit hospital budgets. Cancelled operations impact on patients and hit the bottom line as hospitals are paid for each patient they treat.”

The health department refused to answer questions about conversations with NHSI in advance of the report’s publication. A spokesperson said only: “The department has not been given a copy of the NHS Improvement Q3 report but we understand it will be published this week.”