Tag Archives: health

Our public health guardians have been asleep at the wheel as vaginal mesh tragedy unfolds | Danny Vadasz

It seems inconceivable that the tragedy of failed vaginal mesh implants could have continued undetected for 16 years. And yet it did.

In fact mesh implants remained the preferred clinical procedure to deal with pelvic prolapse and urinary stress incontinence, with estimates suggesting that over 100,000 women have undergone the procedure in Australia.

Obstetricians and gynaecologists have been so confident of the outcome of these implants, they haven’t felt the need to warn their patients of the risks or that the implants are irreversible.

Even when warning signs emerged – and there were plenty of them – women suffering post-operative injury were characterised as outliers, unfortunate but rare failures in the shadows of the glowing success of the devices.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) whose role it is to establish the efficacy and safety of medical devices recorded only 99 adverse outcomes over five years from 2012. From its perspective, this doubtlessly vindicated the claims of manufacturers and surgeons that mesh implants had enhanced the lives of thousands of women.

However we, the Health Issues Centre (HIC), repeatedly heard from women who claimed their lives had been destroyed as a consequence of these implants.

In fact it took a senate inquiry, the HIC and a network of small consumer health organisations to expose what is without a doubt the worst self-inflicted public health crisis since the thalidomide tragedy.

Over six weeks in April and May 2017, HIC conducted research to determine how many women in Australia have been adversely impacted by mesh implants. In those six weeks, we received over 2,000 survey responses and the data was horrifying: 58% of respondents claimed that the procedure failed to resolve their health concerns, with 65% describing their consequent suffering as severe (23%), debilitating (31%) or unendurable (12%). Just 35% believed they had been adequately informed of the risks and potential adverse outcomes of mesh implants.

So why were we able to identify what had evaded the guardians of our health system for so long?

Because we went looking and gave women anonymity and the opportunity to be tell us of their experiences without the added stress and humiliation of public disclosure.

Sadly much of the current debate about the extent of the problem has been framed in terms of the good outcomes of the many outweighing the unfortunate experiences of a few, with clinicians continuing to refer to mesh implants as the gold standard for dealing with incontinence and prolapse.

What they forget is that our health system is based on values such as equity and a universal duty of care, not on a cost/benefit analysis that accepts the unavoidability of collateral damage.

When a few hundred babies were born with birth defects in the 1950s as a result of thalidomide, nobody suggested this was a defensible offset against the thousands of women who had been cured of morning sickness. The product was swiftly and decisively withdrawn from use.

Perhaps we need that event to remind us of the human dimensions of the mesh implants tragedy and to ensure our sense of humanity is not subordinated to a statistical dispute over acceptable failure rates.

But beyond the personal tragedy of women whose lives have been ruined by failed mesh implants is the catastrophic system failure of the very regulatory institutions established to protect public health.

Interestingly, it was in direct response to the thalidomide crisis that the government created what would be the precursor to the TGA. The intent of the organisation was to ensure the public would never again be victims of unproven clinical treatment.

Ironically it is the TGA that has now been singled out for its failure to adequately assess mesh devices before allowing them to proliferate.

While the TGA has many questions to answer, it is not alone in failing its duty of care. Vaginal mesh implants represent a whole-of-system failure and implicates Commonwealth and state health authorities, the various state and federal complaints commissions, the large number of surgeons conducting mesh implant surgery without informed consent, and the professional associations representing these practitioners.

All these guardians of public health have been asleep at the wheel while the mesh implants tragedy has unfolded. They have collectively failed to:

  • adequately evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical devices and procedures;
  • establish a comprehensive register of mesh products and procedures;
  • provide adverse reporting systems to accurately represent health consumer outcomes;
  • act on international evidence and warnings including those of the FDA;
  • initiate the recall of products held in stock even after they have been withdrawn from market;
  • enforce adherence to the principles and practice of informed consent;
  • adopt a patient-centred approach in the treatment of affected women;
  • apply precautionary principles in the face of mounting evidence of adverse outcomes.

However the mesh implants tragedy is also indicative of a broader social and political failure. Despite the lessons we should have learned from the under-reporting of rape, domestic violence and child sexual abuse, we have yet again failed in our duty of care to protect the vulnerable.

In all of these circumstances we elect denial rather than acknowledge system failure. We diminish the tragedy by characterising the cases as exceptional, unrepresentative of typical outcomes. We put the burden of proof on the shoulders of victims who have already been shattered by their experiences. We challenge and discredit them until they doubt their own lived experience. We plead ignorance of the facts and search for convenient scapegoats. We look for closure through expressions of regret rather than genuine remorse and reform.

To rebuild trust in our safety regime, we must firstly admit that our current system has failed us, then begin the task of rebuilding a safety regime that acts decisively with foresight rather than justifying inaction in hindsight.

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Rise in children seeking mental health support after terror attacks

The number of children and young people seeking help from mental health services has spiked in the wake of recent terrorist attacks in England, according to the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP).

Hospitals across the Manchester region have seen an estimated 10% increase in children seeking help since a bomb ripped through the Manchester Arena on 22 May, killing 22 people, according to the RCP. Mental health experts in Greater Manchester hospitals received hundreds more patients from June to July compared with previous months.

Dr Louise Theodosiou, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at Royal Manchester children’s hospital and a member of the RCP, described the increase as significant and said the terror attack had a “profound impact on the way the children view their city”.

Just a small fraction of those treated had been at the concert; the majority of patients had felt increased anxiety after watching the events on the news. Anxiety and insomnia were the most common complaints, with children worrying about going out or being on public transport after the attacks.

Theodosiou warned the number affected could be significantly greater, with people also seeking support through school or voluntary services and many others yet to come forward for help.

A similar trend has been noticed in London. Dr Jon Goldin, the vice-chair of the child and adolescent psychiatry faculty at RCP, said there had also been anecdotal evidence of “a rise in children seeking mental health services after recent terror attacks”.

“Maybe the rise hasn’t been as much as Manchester [...] but some of those with a predisposition to anxiety have had it heightened by these recent events,” he said.

The increase could be linked to young people’s consumption of media, with children able to access disturbing footage on their smartphones, according to experts. It could also be a positive sign that efforts to reduce the stigma around mental health were having an impact.

Dr Rachel Langley, a clinical psychologist from Southampton children’s hospital’s sleepdisorder service, said: “Technology has a huge amount to answer for in fuelling a rise in children’s sleep problems. It gives young people access to what is going on in the world and also … the blue light of the screens affects melatonin release.”

She added: “There was a 10-year-old boy I saw recently who has anxiety-related insomnia and he has a specific concern about his dad, who works in London, getting caught up in a terror attack.”

In Manchester more young people are expected to seek help in the coming months and years. Theodosiou said: “It has unmasked vulnerabilities that were not there before. It’s fair to say that of the hundreds of children affected only a small fraction would have witnessed the events.”

She added: “If you think of the bomb as being like an influenza epidemic, those most affected by that will be ones with underlying respiratory problems [...] and in the same way the group most affected by the terror attack in the city have been those who are vulnerable to mental health at the beginning.”

Peter Sweeney, another psychiatrist from Royal Manchester children’s hospital, said services needed to plan ahead to manage post-traumatic stress disorder that could hit families and young people.

“We needed to do lots of work for the survivors initially … they got a high level of support at the start. Our concern now is more about young people who may be experiencing anxiety but are not presenting to us, so those who were at the concert but not seriously injured or those who were not at the concert but affected,” he said.

The message to children should be that these attacks should not alter behaviour and that people should get on with their normal lives, said Goldin. “Children should get that message as well as adults. If you have anxious parents saying ‘don’t go to London etc’ then that doesn’t give the most helpful message.

“One message to get across is that it’s important not to feel that, when a child is anxious about a terror attack, they should be taken straight to children’s mental health services. Usually family and a normal support network can really help them. When things are more enduring, for example several weeks after a traumatic experience a child is still struggling with sleep or their mood etc, then you would want CAMHS [child and adolescent mental health services] to get involved.”

  • In the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123, and Childline on 0800 1111. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here.

Rise in children seeking mental health support after terror attacks

The number of children and young people seeking help from mental health services has spiked in the wake of recent terrorist attacks in England, according to the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP).

Hospitals across the Manchester region have seen an estimated 10% increase in children seeking help since a bomb ripped through the Manchester Arena on 22 May, killing 22 people, according to the RCP. Mental health experts in Greater Manchester hospitals received hundreds more patients from June to July compared with previous months.

Dr Louise Theodosiou, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at Royal Manchester children’s hospital and a member of the RCP, described the increase as significant and said the terror attack had a “profound impact on the way the children view their city”.

Just a small fraction of those treated had been at the concert; the majority of patients had felt increased anxiety after watching the events on the news. Anxiety and insomnia were the most common complaints, with children worrying about going out or being on public transport after the attacks.

Theodosiou warned the number affected could be significantly greater, with people also seeking support through school or voluntary services and many others yet to come forward for help.

A similar trend has been noticed in London. Dr Jon Goldin, the vice-chair of the child and adolescent psychiatry faculty at RCP, said there had also been anecdotal evidence of “a rise in children seeking mental health services after recent terror attacks”.

“Maybe the rise hasn’t been as much as Manchester [...] but some of those with a predisposition to anxiety have had it heightened by these recent events,” he said.

The increase could be linked to young people’s consumption of media, with children able to access disturbing footage on their smartphones, according to experts. It could also be a positive sign that efforts to reduce the stigma around mental health were having an impact.

Dr Rachel Langley, a clinical psychologist from Southampton children’s hospital’s sleepdisorder service, said: “Technology has a huge amount to answer for in fuelling a rise in children’s sleep problems. It gives young people access to what is going on in the world and also … the blue light of the screens affects melatonin release.”

She added: “There was a 10-year-old boy I saw recently who has anxiety-related insomnia and he has a specific concern about his dad, who works in London, getting caught up in a terror attack.”

In Manchester more young people are expected to seek help in the coming months and years. Theodosiou said: “It has unmasked vulnerabilities that were not there before. It’s fair to say that of the hundreds of children affected only a small fraction would have witnessed the events.”

She added: “If you think of the bomb as being like an influenza epidemic, those most affected by that will be ones with underlying respiratory problems [...] and in the same way the group most affected by the terror attack in the city have been those who are vulnerable to mental health at the beginning.”

Peter Sweeney, another psychiatrist from Royal Manchester children’s hospital, said services needed to plan ahead to manage post-traumatic stress disorder that could hit families and young people.

“We needed to do lots of work for the survivors initially … they got a high level of support at the start. Our concern now is more about young people who may be experiencing anxiety but are not presenting to us, so those who were at the concert but not seriously injured or those who were not at the concert but affected,” he said.

The message to children should be that these attacks should not alter behaviour and that people should get on with their normal lives, said Goldin. “Children should get that message as well as adults. If you have anxious parents saying ‘don’t go to London etc’ then that doesn’t give the most helpful message.

“One message to get across is that it’s important not to feel that, when a child is anxious about a terror attack, they should be taken straight to children’s mental health services. Usually family and a normal support network can really help them. When things are more enduring, for example several weeks after a traumatic experience a child is still struggling with sleep or their mood etc, then you would want CAMHS [child and adolescent mental health services] to get involved.”

  • In the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123, and Childline on 0800 1111. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here.

Terrorism blamed for rise in children seeking mental health support

The number of children and young people seeking help from mental health services has spiked in the wake of recent terror attacks in England, according to the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP).

Hospitals across the Manchester region have seen an estimated 10% increase in children seeking help since a bomb ripped through the Manchester Arena on 22 May, killing 22 people, according to the RCP. Mental health experts in Greater Manchester hospitals received hundreds more patients from June to July compared with previous months.

Dr Louise Theodosiou, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at Royal Manchester children’s hospital and a member of the RCP, described the increase as significant and said the terror attack had a “profound impact on the way the children view their city”.

Just a small fraction of those treated had been at the concert; the majority of patients had felt increased anxiety after watching the events on the news. Anxiety and insomnia were the most common complaints, with children worrying about going out or being on public transport after the attacks.

Theodosiou warned the number affected could be significantly greater, with people also seeking support through school or voluntary services and many others yet to come forward for help.

A similar trend has been noticed in London. Dr Jon Goldin, the vice-chair of the child and adolescent psychiatry faculty at RCP, said there had also been anecdotal evidence of “a rise in children seeking mental health services after recent terror attacks”.

“Maybe the rise hasn’t been as much as Manchester [...] but some of those with a predisposition to anxiety have had it heightened by these recent events,” he said.

The increase could be linked to young people’s consumption of media, with children able to access disturbing footage on their smartphones, according to experts. It could also be a positive sign that efforts to reduce the stigma around mental health were having an impact.

Dr Rachel Langley, a clinical psychologist from Southampton children’s hospital’s sleepdisorder service, said: “Technology has a huge amount to answer for in fuelling a rise in children’s sleep problems. It gives young people access to what is going on in the world and also … the blue light of the screens affects melatonin release.”

She added: “There was a 10-year-old boy I saw recently who has anxiety-related insomnia and he has a specific concern about his dad, who works in London, getting caught up in a terror attack.”

In Manchester more young people are expected to seek help in the coming months and years. Theodosiou said: “It has unmasked vulnerabilities that were not there before. It’s fair to say that of the hundreds of children affected only a small fraction would have witnessed the events.”

She added: “If you think of the bomb as being like an influenza epidemic, those most affected by that will be ones with underlying respiratory problems [...] and in the same way the group most affected by the terror attack in the city have been those who are vulnerable to mental health at the beginning.”

Peter Sweeney, another psychiatrist from Royal Manchester children’s hospital, said services needed to plan ahead to manage post-traumatic stress disorder that could hit families and young people.

“We needed to do lots of work for the survivors initially … they got a high level of support at the start. Our concern now is more about young people who may be experiencing anxiety but are not presenting to us, so those who were at the concert but not seriously injured or those who were not at the concert but affected,” he said.

The message to children should be that these attacks should not alter behaviour and that people should get on with their normal lives, said Goldin. “Children should get that message as well as adults. If you have anxious parents saying ‘don’t go to London etc’ then that doesn’t give the most helpful message.

“One message to get across is that it’s important not to feel that, when a child is anxious about a terror attack, they should be taken straight to children’s mental health services. Usually family and a normal support network can really help them. When things are more enduring, for example several weeks after a traumatic experience a child is still struggling with sleep or their mood etc, then you would want CAMHS [child and adolescent mental health services] to get involved.”

  • In the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123, and Childline on 0800 1111. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here.