Tag Archives: Healthcare

Almost 100 million people a year ‘forced to choose between food and healthcare’

Almost 100 million people are pushed into extreme poverty each year because of debts accrued through healthcare expenses.

A report, published by the World Health Organization and the World Bank on Wednesday, found the poorest and most vulnerable people are routinely forced to choose between healthcare and other necessities for their household, including food and education, subsisting on $ 1.90 (£1.40) a day.

Researchers found that more than 122 million people around the world are forced to live on $ 3.10 a day, the benchmark for “moderate poverty”, due to healthcare expenditure. Since 2000, this number has increased by 1.5% a year.

A total of 800 million people spend more than 10% of their household budgets on “out-of-pocket” health expenses, defined as costs not covered by insurance. Almost 180 million people spend a quarter or more, a population increasing at a rate of almost 5% per year, with women among those worst affected.

“Only 17% of women in the poorest fifth of households have adequate access to maternal and child health services compared to 74% of women in the richest fifth of households,” said Timothy Evans, senior director of health, nutrition and population at the World Bank Group.

“This remains a problem for not only poor regions of the world, but for all countries at all income levels. At the World Bank, we think that this is both morally and economically bankrupt and unsustainable.

“Universal healthcare coverage is not just about better health. The reality is that as long as millions of people are being impoverished by health expenses, we will not reach our collective sustainable development goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030.”

The WHO and the World Bank want everyone, irrespective of their circumstances, to receive necessary health services without risking financial hardship.

Though universal health coverage is a key target of the UN sustainable development goals, campaigners argue that without a solid commitment from governments this target is out of reach.

“Every country has the resources available to them if they prioritise. This is why we want to see a much greater focus on primary healthcare because it is the poorest who are losing out,” said Oxfam’s health policy adviser, Anna Marriott. “Too much funding is going for tertiary hospitals in urban areas that tend to benefit the better off more than the poor, and yet rural areas are neglected, with people left to fend for themselves.

“We absolutely need a commitment to address inequality in health. You are almost four times as likely to get the essential package of healthcare if you are rich.”

According to the report, Asia has the highest rate globally of those pushed below the poverty line due to out-of-pocket health costs. An estimated 72% of those spending 25% of their household budgets on healthcare live in Asia.

Africa has seen the fastest increase in the numbers of people who spent at least 10% of their budgets on healthcare.

The problem of healthcare affordability is not limited to developing countries. In Europe, Latin America and parts of Asia, each of which have high levels of access to health services, increasing numbers of people are spending at least 10% of their household budgets on health expenses.

Almost 100 million people a year ‘forced to choose between food and healthcare’

Almost 100 million people are pushed into extreme poverty each year because of debts accrued through healthcare expenses.

A report, published by the World Health Organization and the World Bank on Wednesday, found the poorest and most vulnerable people are routinely forced to choose between healthcare and other necessities for their household, including food and education, subsisting on $ 1.90 (£1.40) a day.

Researchers found that more than 122 million people around the world are forced to live on $ 3.10 a day, the benchmark for “moderate poverty”, due to healthcare expenditure. Since 2000, this number has increased by 1.5% a year.

A total of 800 million people spend more than 10% of their household budgets on “out-of-pocket” health expenses, defined as costs not covered by insurance. Almost 180 million people spend a quarter or more, a population increasing at a rate of almost 5% per year, with women among those worst affected.

“Only 17% of women in the poorest fifth of households have adequate access to maternal and child health services compared to 74% of women in the richest fifth of households,” said Timothy Evans, senior director of health, nutrition and population at the World Bank Group.

“This remains a problem for not only poor regions of the world, but for all countries at all income levels. At the World Bank, we think that this is both morally and economically bankrupt and unsustainable.

“Universal healthcare coverage is not just about better health. The reality is that as long as millions of people are being impoverished by health expenses, we will not reach our collective sustainable development goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030.”

The WHO and the World Bank want everyone, irrespective of their circumstances, to receive necessary health services without risking financial hardship.

Though universal health coverage is a key target of the UN sustainable development goals, campaigners argue that without a solid commitment from governments this target is out of reach.

“Every country has the resources available to them if they prioritise. This is why we want to see a much greater focus on primary healthcare because it is the poorest who are losing out,” said Oxfam’s health policy adviser, Anna Marriott. “Too much funding is going for tertiary hospitals in urban areas that tend to benefit the better off more than the poor, and yet rural areas are neglected, with people left to fend for themselves.

“We absolutely need a commitment to address inequality in health. You are almost four times as likely to get the essential package of healthcare if you are rich.”

According to the report, Asia has the highest rate globally of those pushed below the poverty line due to out-of-pocket health costs. An estimated 72% of those spending 25% of their household budgets on healthcare live in Asia.

Africa has seen the fastest increase in the numbers of people who spent at least 10% of their budgets on healthcare.

The problem of healthcare affordability is not limited to developing countries. In Europe, Latin America and parts of Asia, each of which have high levels of access to health services, increasing numbers of people are spending at least 10% of their household budgets on health expenses.

Almost 100 million people a year ‘forced to choose between food and healthcare’

Almost 100 million people are pushed into extreme poverty each year because of debts accrued through healthcare expenses.

A report, published by the World Health Organization and the World Bank on Wednesday, found the poorest and most vulnerable people are routinely forced to choose between healthcare and other necessities for their household, including food and education, subsisting on $ 1.90 (£1.40) a day.

Researchers found that more than 122 million people around the world are forced to live on $ 3.10 a day, the benchmark for “moderate poverty”, due to healthcare expenditure. Since 2000, this number has increased by 1.8 million a year.

A total of 800 million people spend more than 10% of their household budgets on “out-of-pocket” health expenses, defined as costs not covered by insurance. Almost 180 million people spend a quarter or more, a population increasing at a rate of almost 5% per year, with women among those worst affected.

“Only 17% of women in the poorest fifth of households have adequate access to maternal and child health services compared to 74% of women in the richest fifth of households,” said Timothy Evans, senior director of health, nutrition and population at the World Bank Group.

“This remains a problem for not only poor regions of the world, but for all countries at all income levels. At the World Bank, we think that this is both morally and economically bankrupt and unsustainable.

“Universal healthcare coverage is not just about better health. The reality is that as long as millions of people are being impoverished by health expenses, we will not reach our collective sustainable development goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030.”

The WHO and the World Bank want everyone, irrespective of their circumstances, to receive necessary health services without risking financial hardship.

Though universal health coverage is a key target of the UN sustainable development goals, campaigners argue that without a solid commitment from governments this target is out of reach.

“Every country has the resources available to them if they prioritise. This is why we want to see a much greater focus on primary healthcare because it is the poorest who are losing out,” said Oxfam’s health policy adviser, Anna Marriott. “Too much funding is going for tertiary hospitals in urban areas that tend to benefit the better off more than the poor, and yet rural areas are neglected, with people left to fend for themselves.

“We absolutely need a commitment to address inequality in health. You are almost four times as likely to get the essential package of healthcare if you are rich.”

According to the report, Asia has the highest rate globally of those pushed below the poverty line due to out-of-pocket health costs. An estimated 72% of those spending 25% of their household budgets on healthcare live in Asia.

Africa has seen the fastest increase in the numbers of people who spent at least 10% of their budgets on healthcare.

The problem of healthcare affordability is not limited to developing countries. In Europe, Latin America and parts of Asia, each of which have high levels of access to health services, increasing numbers of people are spending at least 10% of their household budgets on health expenses.

Almost 100 million people a year ‘forced to choose between food and healthcare’

Almost 100 million people are pushed into extreme poverty each year because of debts accrued through healthcare expenses.

A report, published by the World Health Organization and the World Bank on Wednesday, found the poorest and most vulnerable people are routinely forced to choose between healthcare and other necessities for their household, including food and education, subsisting on $ 1.90 (£1.40) a day.

Researchers found that more than 122 million people around the world are forced to live on $ 3.10 a day, the benchmark for “moderate poverty”, due to healthcare expenditure. Since 2000, this number has increased by 1.8 million a year.

A total of 800 million people spend more than 10% of their household budgets on “out-of-pocket” health expenses, defined as costs not covered by insurance. Almost 180 million people spend a quarter or more, a population increasing at a rate of almost 5% per year, with women among those worst affected.

“Only 17% of women in the poorest fifth of households have adequate access to maternal and child health services compared to 74% of women in the richest fifth of households,” said Timothy Evans, senior director of health, nutrition and population at the World Bank Group.

“This remains a problem for not only poor regions of the world, but for all countries at all income levels. At the World Bank, we think that this is both morally and economically bankrupt and unsustainable.

“Universal healthcare coverage is not just about better health. The reality is that as long as millions of people are being impoverished by health expenses, we will not reach our collective sustainable development goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030.”

The WHO and the World Bank want everyone, irrespective of their circumstances, to receive necessary health services without risking financial hardship.

Though universal health coverage is a key target of the UN sustainable development goals, campaigners argue that without a solid commitment from governments this target is out of reach.

“Every country has the resources available to them if they prioritise. This is why we want to see a much greater focus on primary healthcare because it is the poorest who are losing out,” said Oxfam’s health policy adviser, Anna Marriott. “Too much funding is going for tertiary hospitals in urban areas that tend to benefit the better off more than the poor, and yet rural areas are neglected, with people left to fend for themselves.

“We absolutely need a commitment to address inequality in health. You are almost four times as likely to get the essential package of healthcare if you are rich.”

According to the report, Asia has the highest rate globally of those pushed below the poverty line due to out-of-pocket health costs. An estimated 72% of those spending 25% of their household budgets on healthcare live in Asia.

Africa has seen the fastest increase in the numbers of people who spent at least 10% of their budgets on healthcare.

The problem of healthcare affordability is not limited to developing countries. In Europe, Latin America and parts of Asia, each of which have high levels of access to health services, increasing numbers of people are spending at least 10% of their household budgets on health expenses.

Almost 100 million people a year ‘forced to choose between food and healthcare’

Almost 100 million people are pushed into extreme poverty each year because of debts accrued through healthcare expenses.

A report, published by the World Health Organization and the World Bank on Wednesday, found the poorest and most vulnerable people are routinely forced to choose between healthcare and other necessities for their household, including food and education, subsisting on $ 1.90 (£1.40) a day.

Researchers found that more than 122 million people around the world are forced to live on $ 3.10 a day, the benchmark for “moderate poverty”, due to healthcare expenditure. Since 2000, this number has increased by 1.8 million a year.

A total of 800 million people spend more than 10% of their household budgets on “out-of-pocket” health expenses, defined as costs not covered by insurance. Almost 180 million people spend a quarter or more, a population increasing at a rate of almost 5% per year, with women among those worst affected.

“Only 17% of women in the poorest fifth of households have adequate access to maternal and child health services compared to 74% of women in the richest fifth of households,” said Timothy Evans, senior director of health, nutrition and population at the World Bank Group.

“This remains a problem for not only poor regions of the world, but for all countries at all income levels. At the World Bank, we think that this is both morally and economically bankrupt and unsustainable.

“Universal healthcare coverage is not just about better health. The reality is that as long as millions of people are being impoverished by health expenses, we will not reach our collective sustainable development goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030.”

The WHO and the World Bank want everyone, irrespective of their circumstances, to receive necessary health services without risking financial hardship.

Though universal health coverage is a key target of the UN sustainable development goals, campaigners argue that without a solid commitment from governments this target is out of reach.

“Every country has the resources available to them if they prioritise. This is why we want to see a much greater focus on primary healthcare because it is the poorest who are losing out,” said Oxfam’s health policy adviser, Anna Marriott. “Too much funding is going for tertiary hospitals in urban areas that tend to benefit the better off more than the poor, and yet rural areas are neglected, with people left to fend for themselves.

“We absolutely need a commitment to address inequality in health. You are almost four times as likely to get the essential package of healthcare if you are rich.”

According to the report, Asia has the highest rate globally of those pushed below the poverty line due to out-of-pocket health costs. An estimated 72% of those spending 25% of their household budgets on healthcare live in Asia.

Africa has seen the fastest increase in the numbers of people who spent at least 10% of their budgets on healthcare.

The problem of healthcare affordability is not limited to developing countries. In Europe, Latin America and parts of Asia, each of which have high levels of access to health services, increasing numbers of people are spending at least 10% of their household budgets on health expenses.

Almost 100 million people a year ‘forced to choose between food and healthcare’

Almost 100 million people are pushed into extreme poverty each year because of debts accrued through healthcare expenses.

A report, published by the World Health Organization and the World Bank on Wednesday, found the poorest and most vulnerable people are routinely forced to choose between healthcare and other necessities for their household, including food and education, subsisting on $ 1.90 (£1.40) a day.

Researchers found that more than 122 million people around the world are forced to live on $ 3.10 a day, the benchmark for “moderate poverty”, due to healthcare expenditure. Since 2000, this number has increased by 1.8 million a year.

A total of 800 million people spend more than 10% of their household budgets on “out-of-pocket” health expenses, defined as costs not covered by insurance. Almost 180 million people spend a quarter or more, a population increasing at a rate of almost 5% per year, with women among those worst affected.

“Only 17% of women in the poorest fifth of households have adequate access to maternal and child health services compared to 74% of women in the richest fifth of households,” said Timothy Evans, senior director of health, nutrition and population at the World Bank Group.

“This remains a problem for not only poor regions of the world, but for all countries at all income levels. At the World Bank, we think that this is both morally and economically bankrupt and unsustainable.

“Universal healthcare coverage is not just about better health. The reality is that as long as millions of people are being impoverished by health expenses, we will not reach our collective sustainable development goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030.”

The WHO and the World Bank want everyone, irrespective of their circumstances, to receive necessary health services without risking financial hardship.

Though universal health coverage is a key target of the UN sustainable development goals, campaigners argue that without a solid commitment from governments this target is out of reach.

“Every country has the resources available to them if they prioritise. This is why we want to see a much greater focus on primary healthcare because it is the poorest who are losing out,” said Oxfam’s health policy adviser, Anna Marriott. “Too much funding is going for tertiary hospitals in urban areas that tend to benefit the better off more than the poor, and yet rural areas are neglected, with people left to fend for themselves.

“We absolutely need a commitment to address inequality in health. You are almost four times as likely to get the essential package of healthcare if you are rich.”

According to the report, Asia has the highest rate globally of those pushed below the poverty line due to out-of-pocket health costs. An estimated 72% of those spending 25% of their household budgets on healthcare live in Asia.

Africa has seen the fastest increase in the numbers of people who spent at least 10% of their budgets on healthcare.

The problem of healthcare affordability is not limited to developing countries. In Europe, Latin America and parts of Asia, each of which have high levels of access to health services, increasing numbers of people are spending at least 10% of their household budgets on health expenses.

Working in healthcare over Christmas and new year? Tell us your stories

This Christmas and new year, millions of healthcare professionals across the world will turn up to work as normal.

While treating people at their most vulnerable can be difficult and sad, working over the festive period can also be uplifting. Hospital wards are decked with tinsel and Christmas trees, choirs sing carols and there’s an abundance of chocolates. Meanwhile, staff might help deliver babies, save someone’s life or simply be there for a person in need.

Are you a healthcare professional who has worked at Christmas and/or new year? We want to hear about it. What have been your memorable moments? What’s the atmosphere like? How did you feel working over the festive season? Have you witnessed or been part of any Christmas or new year miracles? What is different about working at this time?

Please fill in the form below and tell us about your experiences of working at Christmas. A selection of responses will be used in our reporting. You can remain anonymous if you wish.

Digital disruption: the role of tech entrepreneurs in improving healthcare

Technology in the NHS is the bane of many healthcare professionals’ jobs. Clinicians have spoken about decrepit computer systems on hospital wards and not being able to access patient information at the right time.

Other sectors, such as the airline industry, banking and retail, are years ahead and incorporate the latest technology to make life easier for customers and employees while also protecting users’ data. The NHS, which uses one in 10 of the world’s pagers and still relies on fax machines, has yet to catch on to some of the more modern developments in technology.

So how do healthcare professionals who have grown up with technology at their fingertips find working in the NHS? What are they faced with in their jobs and how do archaic and creaking IT systems impact on patient care?

Who are the digital entrepreneurs trying to do something about the situation? What innovations are out there? And what challenges do people face trying to introduce them into the NHS?

Join us at the Guardian’s offices in London on 7 February to discuss these questions and more. The event is aimed at healthcare professionals and those with an interest in healthcare tech, and while it is free, please be aware that space is limited. If you’d like to attend, please fill in the form below. Those who have been successful will receive an email to confirm their place.

Programme

6.30pm-7pm: Arrival, registration, refreshments, networking

7pm-7.05pm: Chair’s welcome, Denis Campbell, health policy editor, the Guardian and the Observer

7.05pm-8pm: Panel discussion

Panellists

  • Harpreet Sood, associate chief clinical information officer for NHS England and a practising NHS doctor
  • Mahiben Maruthappu, London-based doctor and co-founder of Cera
  • Nadia Masood, junior doctor and Justice for Health campaigner
  • Neomi Bennet, registered nurse and chief executive, Neo-Innovations UK Ltd

8pm-8.15pm: Audience Q&A

8.15pm-8.45pm: Networking

Digital disruption: the role of tech entrepreneurs in improving healthcare

Technology in the NHS is the bane of many healthcare professionals’ jobs. Clinicians have spoken about decrepit computer systems on hospital wards and not being able to access patient information at the right time.

Other sectors, such as the airline industry, banking and retail, are years ahead and incorporate the latest technology to make life easier for customers and employees while also protecting users’ data. The NHS, which uses one in 10 of the world’s pagers and still relies on fax machines, has yet to catch on to some of the more modern developments in technology.

So how do healthcare professionals who have grown up with technology at their fingertips find working in the NHS? What are they faced with in their jobs and how do archaic and creaking IT systems impact on patient care?

Who are the digital entrepreneurs trying to do something about the situation? What innovations are out there? And what challenges do people face trying to introduce them into the NHS?

Join us at the Guardian’s offices in London on 7 February to discuss these questions and more. The event is aimed at healthcare professionals and those with an interest in healthcare tech, and while it is free, please be aware that space is limited. If you’d like to attend, please fill in the form below. Those who have been successful will receive an email to confirm their place.

Programme

6.30pm-7pm: Arrival, registration, refreshments, networking

7pm-7.05pm: Chair’s welcome, Denis Campbell, health policy editor, the Guardian and the Observer

7.05pm-8pm: Panel discussion

Panellists

  • Harpreet Sood, associate chief clinical information officer for NHS England and a practising NHS doctor
  • Mahiben Maruthappu, London-based doctor and co-founder of Cera
  • Nadia Masood, junior doctor and Justice for Health campaigner
  • Neomi Bennet, registered nurse and chief executive, Neo-Innovations UK Ltd

8pm-8.15pm: Audience Q&A

8.15pm-8.45pm: Networking

Two-thirds of children referred for mental healthcare in England not treated

Sixty per cent of children and young people referred for specialist care by their GP are not receiving treatment, figures reveal.

Data from 32 NHS Trusts in England showed about 60% of under-18s who are referred to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) by their GP are not receiving treatment, according to figures obtained by Spurgeons children’s charity.

The number of under-18s admitted to A&E for self-harm has increased by 50% in five years but outpatient treatment rates are falling, according to the charity. Self-harm admissions to A&E departments for young people have increased for the seventh year running according to figures from 59 A&E departments in England.

The sharp increase in the number of under-18s being admitted to hospital after poisoning, cutting or hanging themselves is more marked among girls, though an increase has also been seen among boys. About 77% of A&E or hospital admissions for self-harm were made by girls from 2010 to 2016.

The news comes after it emerged that children with anxiety and depression will be guaranteed treatment within four weeks in a effort to improve mental healthcare, but the lack of NHS staff and funding means the plan cannot be fully introduced until 2021.

In a bid to ease pressure on the system, Spurgeons children’s charity said it had created a new programme – named FISH – for young people to help those who have self-harmed but do not have a mental health diagnosis and therefore do not qualify for specialist mental health support services such as CAMHS.

“The facts are harrowing. At least four young people in every secondary school class are now self-harming. Within the last decade we’ve seen a considerable rise in the range of mental health issues impacting young people, in part due to social media pressures and the ongoing stigma towards speaking about our mental health,” said Jag Basra, an assistant psychologist and lead on FISH.

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, the chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ child and adolescent faculty, called on NHS England to stand by its pledge to invest an additional £1bn in frontline mental health services and treat 1 million more people by 2021.

“Young people are presenting in ever greater numbers to A&E, GP referral rates have soared, and our workforce is struggling to meet this demand,” she said. “Our young people urgently need access to timely specialist treatment as well as investment in early intervention and prevention [...] This is a matter of life and death.”

The figures were “alarming”, said Tom Madders, campaigns director at YoungMinds. “We know from calls to our parents’ helpline that far too many young people with mental health problems do not get the help they need, and that too often the right support is not available until they reach crisis point,” he said.

“That’s why the government must ensure that CAMHS funding reflects the true scale of the need, and that money is not siphoned off to other priorities.”

Barbara Keeley MP, the shadow minister for social care and mental health, said the “continual increase” in A&E admissions for under-18s due to self-harm was concerning.

“Children and young people’s mental health services will be plunged into further crisis by an inadequate Tory budget which ignored mental health entirely,” she said.

“The lack of access to services for two-thirds of children is a damning reminder of the Tories’ failure to match their warm words about mental health with action.”