Tag Archives: heart

Caffeine might help people with heart troubles, research says

Drinking coffee and tea every day may actually benefit people with heart troubles.

New research has linked caffeine consumption from the two popular drinks to decreased rates of arrhythmias, or abnormal heart rhythms.

Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon

But the researchers warn against the consumption of energy drinks that contain high levels of caffeine for anyone with a pre-existing heart condition.

Arrhythmias cause the heart to beat too fast, slow or unevenly. Many clinicians advise patients with atrial or ventricular arrhythmias to avoid caffeinated beverages.

“There is a public perception, often based on anecdotal experience, that caffeine is a common acute trigger for heart rhythm problems,” said Dr Peter Kistler, director of electrophysiology at Alfred hospital and Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute. “Our extensive review of the medical literature suggests this is not the case.”

Researchers reviewed 11 major international studies involving 360,000 people and found caffeine had no effect on ventricular arrhythmias.

The analysis suggests caffeine intake of up to 300 milligrams a day may be safe for patients with arrhythmias. This equate to roughly three cups of coffee.

But there may be individual differences in susceptibility to the effects of caffeine on the factors which trigger arrhythmias in some, the researchers noted.

“Caffeinated beverages such as coffee and tea may have long term anti-arrhythmic properties mediated by antioxidant effects and antagonism of adenosine,” Kistler said. “In numerous population-based studies, patients who regularly consume coffee and tea at moderate levels have a lower lifetime risk of developing heart rhythm problems and possibly improved survival.”

The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Caffeine might help people with heart troubles, research says

Drinking coffee and tea every day may actually benefit people with heart troubles.

New research has linked caffeine consumption from the two popular drinks to decreased rates of arrhythmias, or abnormal heart rhythms.

Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon

But the researchers warn against the consumption of energy drinks that contain high levels of caffeine for anyone with a pre-existing heart condition.

Arrhythmias cause the heart to beat too fast, slow or unevenly. Many clinicians advise patients with atrial or ventricular arrhythmias to avoid caffeinated beverages.

“There is a public perception, often based on anecdotal experience, that caffeine is a common acute trigger for heart rhythm problems,” said Dr Peter Kistler, director of electrophysiology at Alfred hospital and Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute. “Our extensive review of the medical literature suggests this is not the case.”

Researchers reviewed 11 major international studies involving 360,000 people and found caffeine had no effect on ventricular arrhythmias.

The analysis suggests caffeine intake of up to 300 milligrams a day may be safe for patients with arrhythmias. This equate to roughly three cups of coffee.

But there may be individual differences in susceptibility to the effects of caffeine on the factors which trigger arrhythmias in some, the researchers noted.

“Caffeinated beverages such as coffee and tea may have long term anti-arrhythmic properties mediated by antioxidant effects and antagonism of adenosine,” Kistler said. “In numerous population-based studies, patients who regularly consume coffee and tea at moderate levels have a lower lifetime risk of developing heart rhythm problems and possibly improved survival.”

The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Caffeine might help people with heart troubles, research says

Drinking coffee and tea every day may actually benefit people with heart troubles.

New research has linked caffeine consumption from the two popular drinks to decreased rates of arrhythmias, or abnormal heart rhythms.

Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon

But the researchers warn against the consumption of energy drinks that contain high levels of caffeine for anyone with a pre-existing heart condition.

Arrhythmias cause the heart to beat too fast, slow or unevenly. Many clinicians advise patients with atrial or ventricular arrhythmias to avoid caffeinated beverages.

“There is a public perception, often based on anecdotal experience, that caffeine is a common acute trigger for heart rhythm problems,” said Dr Peter Kistler, director of electrophysiology at Alfred hospital and Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute. “Our extensive review of the medical literature suggests this is not the case.”

Researchers reviewed 11 major international studies involving 360,000 people and found caffeine had no effect on ventricular arrhythmias.

The analysis suggests caffeine intake of up to 300 milligrams a day may be safe for patients with arrhythmias. This equate to roughly three cups of coffee.

But there may be individual differences in susceptibility to the effects of caffeine on the factors which trigger arrhythmias in some, the researchers noted.

“Caffeinated beverages such as coffee and tea may have long term anti-arrhythmic properties mediated by antioxidant effects and antagonism of adenosine,” Kistler said. “In numerous population-based studies, patients who regularly consume coffee and tea at moderate levels have a lower lifetime risk of developing heart rhythm problems and possibly improved survival.”

The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Eat your brussels: scientists say vegetable provides heart benefits to older women

Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women.

A University of Western Australia study of more than 950 women aged 70 and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls.

A thickening of the artery walls, known as atherosclerosis, is an underlying cause of cardiovascular disease.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.

“This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease,” said Lauren Blekkenhorst, study lead author and PhD candidate at the University of Western Australia in Crawley.

For the study, researchers distributed food frequency questionnaires to participants. The women noted their vegetable intake in a range from “never eating vegetables” to “three or more times per day”.

Vegetable types included cruciferous, allium (onions, garlic, leeks and shallots), yellow/orange/red, leafy green and legumes.

Sonograms were used to measure carotid artery wall thickness and severity of plaque build-up in the carotid artery. Researchers observed a 0.05mm lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables.

“That is likely significant, because a 0.1mm decrease in carotid wall thickness is associated with a 10% to 18% decrease in risk of stroke and heart attack,” said Blekkenhorst.

In addition, each increase of 10 grams per day in cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with 0.8% lower carotid artery wall thickness, on average.

Other vegetable types did not show the same association.

“After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness,” Blekkenhorst said.

However, this was only an observational study and a causal relationship cannot be established, she noted.

“Still, dietary guidelines should highlight the importance of increasing consumption of cruciferous vegetables for protection from vascular disease.”

Eat your brussels: scientists say vegetable provides heart benefits to older women

Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women.

A University of Western Australia study of more than 950 women aged 70 and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls.

A thickening of the artery walls, known as atherosclerosis, is an underlying cause of cardiovascular disease.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.

“This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease,” said Lauren Blekkenhorst, study lead author and PhD candidate at the University of Western Australia in Crawley.

For the study, researchers distributed food frequency questionnaires to participants. The women noted their vegetable intake in a range from “never eating vegetables” to “three or more times per day”.

Vegetable types included cruciferous, allium (onions, garlic, leeks and shallots), yellow/orange/red, leafy green and legumes.

Sonograms were used to measure carotid artery wall thickness and severity of plaque build-up in the carotid artery. Researchers observed a 0.05mm lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables.

“That is likely significant, because a 0.1mm decrease in carotid wall thickness is associated with a 10% to 18% decrease in risk of stroke and heart attack,” said Blekkenhorst.

In addition, each increase of 10 grams per day in cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with 0.8% lower carotid artery wall thickness, on average.

Other vegetable types did not show the same association.

“After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness,” Blekkenhorst said.

However, this was only an observational study and a causal relationship cannot be established, she noted.

“Still, dietary guidelines should highlight the importance of increasing consumption of cruciferous vegetables for protection from vascular disease.”

Eat your brussels: scientists say vegetable provides heart benefits to older women

Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women.

A University of Western Australia study of more than 950 women aged 70 and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls.

A thickening of the artery walls, known as atherosclerosis, is an underlying cause of cardiovascular disease.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.

“This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease,” said Lauren Blekkenhorst, study lead author and PhD candidate at the University of Western Australia in Crawley.

For the study, researchers distributed food frequency questionnaires to participants. The women noted their vegetable intake in a range from “never eating vegetables” to “three or more times per day”.

Vegetable types included cruciferous, allium (onions, garlic, leeks and shallots), yellow/orange/red, leafy green and legumes.

Sonograms were used to measure carotid artery wall thickness and severity of plaque build-up in the carotid artery. Researchers observed a 0.05mm lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables.

“That is likely significant, because a 0.1mm decrease in carotid wall thickness is associated with a 10% to 18% decrease in risk of stroke and heart attack,” said Blekkenhorst.

In addition, each increase of 10 grams per day in cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with 0.8% lower carotid artery wall thickness, on average.

Other vegetable types did not show the same association.

“After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness,” Blekkenhorst said.

However, this was only an observational study and a causal relationship cannot be established, she noted.

“Still, dietary guidelines should highlight the importance of increasing consumption of cruciferous vegetables for protection from vascular disease.”

Eat your brussels: scientists say vegetable provides heart benefits to older women

Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women.

A University of Western Australia study of more than 950 women aged 70 and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls.

A thickening of the artery walls, known as atherosclerosis, is an underlying cause of cardiovascular disease.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.

“This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease,” said Lauren Blekkenhorst, study lead author and PhD candidate at the University of Western Australia in Crawley.

For the study, researchers distributed food frequency questionnaires to participants. The women noted their vegetable intake in a range from “never eating vegetables” to “three or more times per day”.

Vegetable types included cruciferous, allium (onions, garlic, leeks and shallots), yellow/orange/red, leafy green and legumes.

Sonograms were used to measure carotid artery wall thickness and severity of plaque build-up in the carotid artery. Researchers observed a 0.05mm lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables.

“That is likely significant, because a 0.1mm decrease in carotid wall thickness is associated with a 10% to 18% decrease in risk of stroke and heart attack,” said Blekkenhorst.

In addition, each increase of 10 grams per day in cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with 0.8% lower carotid artery wall thickness, on average.

Other vegetable types did not show the same association.

“After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness,” Blekkenhorst said.

However, this was only an observational study and a causal relationship cannot be established, she noted.

“Still, dietary guidelines should highlight the importance of increasing consumption of cruciferous vegetables for protection from vascular disease.”

Eat your brussels: scientists say vegetable provides heart benefits to older women

Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women.

A University of Western Australia study of more than 950 women aged 70 and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls.

A thickening of the artery walls, known as atherosclerosis, is an underlying cause of cardiovascular disease.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.

“This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease,” said Lauren Blekkenhorst, study lead author and PhD candidate at the University of Western Australia in Crawley.

For the study, researchers distributed food frequency questionnaires to participants. The women noted their vegetable intake in a range from “never eating vegetables” to “three or more times per day”.

Vegetable types included cruciferous, allium (onions, garlic, leeks and shallots), yellow/orange/red, leafy green and legumes.

Sonograms were used to measure carotid artery wall thickness and severity of plaque build-up in the carotid artery. Researchers observed a 0.05mm lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables.

“That is likely significant, because a 0.1mm decrease in carotid wall thickness is associated with a 10% to 18% decrease in risk of stroke and heart attack,” said Blekkenhorst.

In addition, each increase of 10 grams per day in cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with 0.8% lower carotid artery wall thickness, on average.

Other vegetable types did not show the same association.

“After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness,” Blekkenhorst said.

However, this was only an observational study and a causal relationship cannot be established, she noted.

“Still, dietary guidelines should highlight the importance of increasing consumption of cruciferous vegetables for protection from vascular disease.”

Eat your brussels: scientists say vegetable provides heart benefits to older women

Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women.

A University of Western Australia study of more than 950 women aged 70 and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls.

A thickening of the artery walls, known as atherosclerosis, is an underlying cause of cardiovascular disease.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.

“This is one of only a few studies that have explored the potential impact of different types of vegetables on measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease,” said Lauren Blekkenhorst, study lead author and PhD candidate at the University of Western Australia in Crawley.

For the study, researchers distributed food frequency questionnaires to participants. The women noted their vegetable intake in a range from “never eating vegetables” to “three or more times per day”.

Vegetable types included cruciferous, allium (onions, garlic, leeks and shallots), yellow/orange/red, leafy green and legumes.

Sonograms were used to measure carotid artery wall thickness and severity of plaque build-up in the carotid artery. Researchers observed a 0.05mm lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables.

“That is likely significant, because a 0.1mm decrease in carotid wall thickness is associated with a 10% to 18% decrease in risk of stroke and heart attack,” said Blekkenhorst.

In addition, each increase of 10 grams per day in cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with 0.8% lower carotid artery wall thickness, on average.

Other vegetable types did not show the same association.

“After adjusting for lifestyle, cardiovascular disease risk factors (including medication use) as well as other vegetable types and dietary factors, our results continued to show a protective association between cruciferous vegetables and carotid artery wall thickness,” Blekkenhorst said.

However, this was only an observational study and a causal relationship cannot be established, she noted.

“Still, dietary guidelines should highlight the importance of increasing consumption of cruciferous vegetables for protection from vascular disease.”

Arnold Schwarzenegger undergoes heart surgery

Arnold Schwarzenegger had heart surgery in Los Angeles on Thursday, his representative has confirmed.

The former California governor and Terminator actor underwent surgery to replace a pulmonic valve, a spokesman, Daniel Ketchell, said in a statement.

Schwarzenegger originally had the valve replaced in 1997 to counter a congenital heart defect. Ketchell said Thursday’s operation was a planned procedure to replace that same valve.

“That 1997 replacement valve was never meant to be permanent and has outlived its life expectancy, so he chose to replace it yesterday through a less-invasive catheter valve replacement,” Ketchell said.

The spokesman claimed Schwarzenegger’s first words upon waking from the operation were “I’m back”.

The celebrity news website TMZ had reported early on Friday that Schwarzenegger had undergone “emergency open-heart surgery”, sparking a wave of news coverage, but Ketchell said that although an open-heart surgery team had attended the operation, they were only there as a precaution.

“They frequently are in these circumstances, in case the catheter procedure was unable to be performed,” Ketchell said.

“Governor Schwarzenegger’s pulmonic valve was successfully replaced.”

Schwarzenegger, 70, was 49 when he had his first heart surgery.

“Choosing to undergo open-heart surgery when I never felt sick was the hardest decision I’ve ever made,” Schwarzenegger said at the time.

The actor, who served as governor of California from 2003 to 2011, has been most active recently in his role as a Donald Trump antagonist.

Schwarzenegger has criticized Trump over his response to the violence in Charlottesville – Trump defended far-right marchers – and over the president’s tax reforms.

In 2017, James Cameron, who wrote and directed the first two Terminator films, said Schwarzenegger had signed up to appear in a sixth Terminator movie. The film will be set in Mexico City, although it is not clear when it will be released.