Tag Archives: Hurt

Brexit could destroy the NHS. This will hurt us all | Jonathan Lis

Of the lies told during the Brexit referendum – and there were many – perhaps the most egregious was the claim that we could spend an extra £350m on the NHS as a result of leaving the EU. It has gained unique notoriety not simply because the figure was demonstrably false, or even because Brexit will shrink the economy rather than free up vital funds, but rather because of its calculated emotional manipulation. We value the NHS more than any other institution. As the defining icon of the post-war consensus and intrinsic component of our national story, it unites Britons across political, geographical and class divides. Crippled by austerity, staff shortages and low morale, our NHS is also on its knees. But far from offering a helping hand, Brexit threatens to bring it down altogether.

A report in the Lancet offers a comprehensive – and bleak – analysis of the dangers. Brexit stands to damage staffing, funding, access to new products and technology, and standards of public health. The softer the Brexit, the lower the harm – but as Theresa May’s speech in Florence made clear, the government still plans to leave the single market, customs union and other EU bodies after a transition ends in 2021, no matter the cost.


Telling NHS workers they can help us, but forget about ever settling or becoming British, may not prove attractive

The key area of risk is also the central plank of Brexit: restrictions on free movement of people. This is no coincidence. While millions of leave voters expressed the concern that immigration was posing an intolerable burden on public services, studies have repeatedly indicated that it in fact keeps them afloat. The NHS and adult social care employs 150,000 EU nationals; 10% of our doctors graduated in EEA countries. The government continually promises that the “brightest and best” will always be welcome, but this elitist and divisive slogan fails even on its own terms. Britain’s most vulnerable patients do not simply depend on EU surgeons, GPs and nurses, but on an army of notionally “unskilled” carers, porters and cleaners who help to keep people alive.

Even if the government prioritises NHS workers in its post-Brexit immigration strategy, grave damage has already been done. This week, a molecular biologist in Madrid told me that London was his favourite city, but its political climate now too hostile to consider returning. The figures bear out the anecdote: while 40,000 nursing positions currently lie vacant, the number of EU nurses registering to work here has dropped by a staggering 96%. While fewer arrive, more depart. About 10,000 EU nationals have left the NHS in the past year.

Britain no longer feels like a welcoming place for foreigners. Let alone the shame, we should also feel profound alarm. We do not have the doctors and nurses that we need as it is; and even if the government was adequately investing in training – which it isn’t – we would still have no time to replace those Europeans who either intend to leave or never even come. To add idiocy to injury, the recently leaked government proposals on immigration specified time-limited work permits, with permanent residency a possibility only for the most highly skilled. Telling NHS workers that they can help us for a few years, but probably forget about ever settling or becoming British, may not prove an attractive offer.

The problem for the NHS is that unlike, say, the single market or Irish border issue, it is not in itself an EU competence and will not be negotiated at the Brexit table. What we do with our healthcare has always been a matter for us alone. But as with so much else in Brexit, problems both predictable and previously unforeseen are threatening key aspects of our national infrastructure.

While remain campaigners stressed the risks to the NHS of reduced immigration and a diminished economy, few mentioned the €3.5bn supplied by the European Investment Bank to the NHS since 2001, or publicised the dangers to cancer patients of leaving the European Atomic Energy Community or the European Medicines Agency. The government, for its part, is so consumed with fire-fighting that it is neglecting to recognise the NHS for what it is: one of Brexit’s key issues, and potentially its most high-profile piece of collateral damage.

Like the ravens at the Tower of London whose departure, in legend, presages the nation’s fall, the NHS’s success – or collapse – is also Britain’s. Brexit’s architects knew that people would respond to appeals to help it; faced with a false prospectus, the public duly chose British hospitals over Brussels bureaucrats. Those same voters may yet punish Brexit’s leaders, but the national consequences will profoundly eclipse any political ones. After all, the risk of deploying your most treasured family heirloom as a political football is not just that it could ultimately land in your own goal – but that in your recklessness, you may irreparably smash it.

Jonathan Lis is deputy director of the thinktank British Influence

Brexit could destroy the NHS. This will hurt us all | Jonathan Lis

Of the lies told during the Brexit referendum – and there were many – perhaps the most egregious was the claim that we could spend an extra £350m on the NHS as a result of leaving the EU. It has gained unique notoriety not simply because the figure was demonstrably false, or even because Brexit will shrink the economy rather than free up vital funds, but rather because of its calculated emotional manipulation. We value the NHS more than any other institution. As the defining icon of the post-war consensus and intrinsic component of our national story, it unites Britons across political, geographical and class divides. Crippled by austerity, staff shortages and low morale, our NHS is also on its knees. But far from offering a helping hand, Brexit threatens to bring it down altogether.

A report in the Lancet offers a comprehensive – and bleak – analysis of the dangers. Brexit stands to damage staffing, funding, access to new products and technology, and standards of public health. The softer the Brexit, the lower the harm – but as Theresa May’s speech in Florence made clear, the government still plans to leave the single market, customs union and other EU bodies after a transition ends in 2021, no matter the cost.


Telling NHS workers they can help us, but forget about ever settling or becoming British, may not prove attractive

The key area of risk is also the central plank of Brexit: restrictions on free movement of people. This is no coincidence. While millions of leave voters expressed the concern that immigration was posing an intolerable burden on public services, studies have repeatedly indicated that it in fact keeps them afloat. The NHS and adult social care employs 150,000 EU nationals; 10% of our doctors graduated in EEA countries. The government continually promises that the “brightest and best” will always be welcome, but this elitist and divisive slogan fails even on its own terms. Britain’s most vulnerable patients do not simply depend on EU surgeons, GPs and nurses, but on an army of notionally “unskilled” carers, porters and cleaners who help to keep people alive.

Even if the government prioritises NHS workers in its post-Brexit immigration strategy, grave damage has already been done. This week, a molecular biologist in Madrid told me that London was his favourite city, but its political climate now too hostile to consider returning. The figures bear out the anecdote: while 40,000 nursing positions currently lie vacant, the number of EU nurses registering to work here has dropped by a staggering 96%. While fewer arrive, more depart. About 10,000 EU nationals have left the NHS in the past year.

Britain no longer feels like a welcoming place for foreigners. Let alone the shame, we should also feel profound alarm. We do not have the doctors and nurses that we need as it is; and even if the government was adequately investing in training – which it isn’t – we would still have no time to replace those Europeans who either intend to leave or never even come. To add idiocy to injury, the recently leaked government proposals on immigration specified time-limited work permits, with permanent residency a possibility only for the most highly skilled. Telling NHS workers that they can help us for a few years, but probably forget about ever settling or becoming British, may not prove an attractive offer.

The problem for the NHS is that unlike, say, the single market or Irish border issue, it is not in itself an EU competence and will not be negotiated at the Brexit table. What we do with our healthcare has always been a matter for us alone. But as with so much else in Brexit, problems both predictable and previously unforeseen are threatening key aspects of our national infrastructure.

While remain campaigners stressed the risks to the NHS of reduced immigration and a diminished economy, few mentioned the €3.5bn supplied by the European Investment Bank to the NHS since 2001, or publicised the dangers to cancer patients of leaving the European Atomic Energy Community or the European Medicines Agency. The government, for its part, is so consumed with fire-fighting that it is neglecting to recognise the NHS for what it is: one of Brexit’s key issues, and potentially its most high-profile piece of collateral damage.

Like the ravens at the Tower of London whose departure, in legend, presages the nation’s fall, the NHS’s success – or collapse – is also Britain’s. Brexit’s architects knew that people would respond to appeals to help it; faced with a false prospectus, the public duly chose British hospitals over Brussels bureaucrats. Those same voters may yet punish Brexit’s leaders, but the national consequences will profoundly eclipse any political ones. After all, the risk of deploying your most treasured family heirloom as a political football is not just that it could ultimately land in your own goal – but that in your recklessness, you may irreparably smash it.

Jonathan Lis is deputy director of the thinktank British Influence

Why do my nipples hurt? You asked Google – here’s the answer | the panel

Because of … medical reasons, says Dr Ann Robinson

Ann Robinson

Nipples are sensitive to touch, temperature and vibration – as any breastfeeding mum or nipple-pierced teen will tell you. It’s one of the parts of the body, like the clitoris or earlobes, that has lots of nerve endings that respond to sensation. That’s good when you want to be stimulated but bad when nipples start to ache with no obvious cause.

It’s natural to worry that painful nipples may be a sign of breast cancer, but it hardly ever is. Breast cancer most commonly starts as a painless lump in one breast, though occasionally a breast lump can be tender to touch. A rare condition called Paget’s disease of the nipple causes red, scaly skin (eczema) of one nipple which may itch, burn or bleed. Paget’s is often associated with an underlying cancer and, like other types of breast cancer, is more likely if you are older, female, and have a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. The bottom line is that any man or woman of any age who notices a breast lump or nipple changes should get an urgent medical opinion.

In practice, nipples usually hurt because of tiny cracks (fissures) caused by friction. Jogger’s nipple is a common hazard of long-distance running, and over-enthusiastic sucking by a baby (or sexual partner) can cause the same problem. Many women get cyclical breast pain due to hormonal fluctuations; breasts and nipples feel engorged and tender in the days leading up to a period and then improve dramatically once the period starts.

Non-cyclical breast pain is not well-understood; it doesn’t vary much with the menstrual cycle and may be part of more widespread pain conditions like fibromyalgia or inflammation in the chest wall that lies under the breasts. So nipple tenderness is rarely due to a dangerous underlying condition, but if it doesn’t get better within a few days or you have no idea what’s caused it, it’s definitely worth seeing your GP.

Because of … sex, says Nichi Hodgson

Nichi Hodgson

Nipple play, a long-recorded pleasure in every text from the Kama Sutra to 50 Shades of Grey, is enjoyed by both men and women alike. What makes it so enjoyable are the thousands of nerve endings our nipples contain – even male nipples each contain around 3,000 to 6,000 delicate nerve endings and around 2,000 to 4,000 erogenous nerve endings which are intertwined with the sensory touch receptors. For women, additional sensitivity comes from hormonal changes. Couple this with the fineness of the skin – just under 1mm at the thinnest point – and you begin to understand why yanking, biting or even over-robust tweaking can cause substantial pain.

Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable. It’s worth noting that the ties and weights you sometimes see in BDSM porn are there to create pleasure not when they are loaded on, but when they are released and the blood flows back into the previously restricted area, thereby increasing sensitivity and sensation. If you thought it was all about enduring weight, you can let that preconception go now, for the good of your anatomy.

A scene from Fifty Shades of Grey


‘Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable.’ Photograph: Universal Pictures/PA

The trouble is, even when you’re safely restricting with specially designed nipple ties or clamps (it’s not advisable to use wire, household pegs, or hair clips) it can be hard to know just where the comfortable threshold really lies, something which you only discover you’ve transgressed later when the play is over and the real pain rather than the sensitivity begins to set in. As a rule of thumb, if you’re still feeling the hurt four to six hours later, you’ve overdone it.

Ice wrapped in a suitable compress is best for bruising, lanolin cream for any skin breaking. And if the sensitivity is only slight, incredibly gentle “kissing better” may be an option for women – it’s been shown to cause the release of oxytocin, which acts as a natural painkiller.

Because of … running, says Adharanand Finn

Adharanand Finn
Photograph: Supplied for byline

If you’ve ever been out to watch a big running race such as the London marathon, particularly near the end, you will have spotted the guys with the two red circles of blood on their tops, like two gory bullet holes. It has probably made you wince, and for good reason … it hurts like hell. Yet bleeding nipples is quite preventable, and to suffer from it is a rookie mistake.

Nipples bleed from your T-shirt rubbing against them, it’s that simple. And the longer you run, the more likely it is to happen. If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction. Sweating a lot on a hot day has the same effect.

To prevent bleeding, step one: avoid cotton T-shirts, as once they get wet they stay wet, unlike a “technical” running T-shirt which, in the advertising lingo, “wicks moisture away” – they do work, unless it’s a complete downpour. You’re also better off with a tighter-fitting top than with a big, oversized number bouncing around all over the place.

Man jogging in puddle in rural field


‘If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction.’ Photograph: Dave and Les Jacobs/Getty Images/Blend Images

But even on a cool, dry day and with the right T-shirt, bleeding nipples can still be a problem if you run long enough, so, for step two, you would be well advised to go in for some localised protection. The options are many and varied. Vaseline works for a while, as do specialist lube products such as Bodyglide and Squirrel’s Nut Butter. For stronger protection – if it looks like rain, or you find you’re prone to this, or whatever other reason – a plaster over each nipple is almost fail-safe (except when it falls off); or if you want to get seriously professional, then a purpose-built protector called a Nip Guard may be called for.

Women, by virtue of tightly fitting sports bras, tend to suffer from this less, but be warned, if you run, no nipple is immune.

Because of … motherhood, says Rebecca Schiller

Rebecca Schiller

Are you suddenly super sensitive to your nipples and breasts being touched? Batting away your partner’s hand and wincing as you put on your bra? Tender, tingling breasts with increasingly visible veins can be one of the first signs of pregnancy. If this is you, then it’s probably time for a trip to the chemist.

Breast changes can start as early as six weeks in to pregnancy, but happily the sore nipples phase is usually confined to the first trimester, with some women describing it as an exaggerated version of the heavy tenderness they feel before their period starts. If you choose to continue with your pregnancy, you can expect your breasts to continue to grow, enlarging by at least a couple of cup sizes by the time your baby arrives. Your areola (the circle around your nipple) will grow and darken dramatically, turning it in to a target for your newborn to aim at. The little bumps on your areola (glands, called Montgomery’s tubercles) will be more obvious as they get ready to secrete a protective lubricant for your nipples.

A mother breastfeeding


‘Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain.’ Photograph: Katie Collins/PA

After the birth, cool packs and very tight, supportive, non-wired bras will help get you through engorgement if you aren’t breastfeeding. If you are, then feeding your baby will relieve the pressure in your breasts that should peak approximately four days after birth when your milk comes in. Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain. If your nipples are increasingly sore or become damaged, then get down to your nearest breastfeeding support group or ring the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers helpline swiftly to fine tune your technique as a duo.

Raynaud’s syndrome, thrush or changes to your older baby’s mouth due to teething can also cause temporary nipple pain. Making friends with your local breastfeeding support group early on will give you access to help from people who have seen and experienced it all. They can also advise you on minimising pain and stress whenever you and/or your child are ready to stop.

Why do my nipples hurt? You asked Google – here’s the answer | the panel

Because of … medical reasons, says Dr Ann Robinson

Nipples are sensitive to touch, temperature and vibration – as any breastfeeding mum or nipple-pierced teen will tell you. It’s one of the parts of the body, like the clitoris or earlobes, that has lots of nerve endings that respond to sensation. That’s good when you want to be stimulated but bad when nipples start to ache with no obvious cause.

It’s natural to worry that painful nipples may be a sign of breast cancer, but it hardly ever is. Breast cancer most commonly starts as a painless lump in one breast, though occasionally a breast lump can be tender to touch. A rare condition called Paget’s disease of the nipple causes red, scaly skin (eczema) of one nipple which may itch, burn or bleed. Paget’s is often associated with an underlying cancer and, like other types of breast cancer, is more likely if you are older, female, and have a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. The bottom line is that any man or woman of any age who notices a breast lump or nipple changes should get an urgent medical opinion.

In practice, nipples usually hurt because of tiny cracks (fissures) caused by friction. Jogger’s nipple is a common hazard of long-distance running, and over-enthusiastic sucking by a baby (or sexual partner) can cause the same problem. Many women get cyclical breast pain due to hormonal fluctuations; breasts and nipples feel engorged and tender in the days leading up to a period and then improve dramatically once the period starts.

Non-cyclical breast pain is not well-understood; it doesn’t vary much with the menstrual cycle and may be part of more widespread pain conditions like fibromyalgia or inflammation in the chest wall that lies under the breasts. So nipple tenderness is rarely due to a dangerous underlying condition, but if it doesn’t get better within a few days or you have no idea what’s caused it, it’s definitely worth seeing your GP.

Because of … sex, says Nichi Hodgson

Nichi Hodgson

Nipple play, a long-recorded pleasure in every text from the Kama Sutra to 50 Shades of Grey, is enjoyed by both men and women alike. What makes it so enjoyable are the thousands of nerve endings our nipples contain – even male nipples each contain around 3,000 to 6,000 delicate nerve endings and around 2,000 to 4,000 erogenous nerve endings which are intertwined with the sensory touch receptors. For women, additional sensitivity comes from hormonal changes. Couple this with the fineness of the skin – just under 1mm at the thinnest point – and you begin to understand why yanking, biting or even over-robust tweaking can cause substantial pain.

Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable. It’s worth noting that the ties and weights you sometimes see in BDSM porn are there to create pleasure not when they are loaded on, but when they are released and the blood flows back into the previously restricted area, thereby increasing sensitivity and sensation. If you thought it was all about enduring weight, you can let that preconception go now, for the good of your anatomy.

A scene from Fifty Shades of Grey


‘Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable.’ Photograph: Universal Pictures/PA

The trouble is, even when you’re safely restricting with specially designed nipple ties or clamps (it’s not advisable to use wire, household pegs, or hair clips) it can be hard to know just where the comfortable threshold really lies, something which you only discover you’ve transgressed later when the play is over and the real pain rather than the sensitivity begins to set in. As a rule of thumb, if you’re still feeling the hurt four to six hours later, you’ve overdone it.

Ice wrapped in a suitable compress is best for bruising, lanolin cream for any skin breaking. And if the sensitivity is only slight, incredibly gentle “kissing better” may be an option for women – it’s been shown to cause the release of oxytocin, which acts as a natural painkiller.

Because of … running, says Adharanand Finn

If you’ve ever been out to watch a big running race such as the London marathon, particularly near the end, you will have spotted the guys with the two red circles of blood on their tops, like two gory bullet holes. It has probably made you wince, and for good reason … it hurts like hell. Yet bleeding nipples is quite preventable, and to suffer from it is a rookie mistake.

Nipples bleed from your T-shirt rubbing against them, it’s that simple. And the longer you run, the more likely it is to happen. If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction. Sweating a lot on a hot day has the same effect.

To prevent bleeding, step one: avoid cotton T-shirts, as once they get wet they stay wet, unlike a “technical” running T-shirt which, in the advertising lingo, “wicks moisture away” – they do work, unless it’s a complete downpour. You’re also better off with a tighter-fitting top than with a big, oversized number bouncing around all over the place.

Man jogging in puddle in rural field


‘If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction.’ Photograph: Dave and Les Jacobs/Getty Images/Blend Images

But even on a cool, dry day and with the right T-shirt, bleeding nipples can still be a problem if you run long enough, so, for step two, you would be well advised to go in for some localised protection. The options are many and varied. Vaseline works for a while, as do specialist lube products such as Bodyglide and Squirrel’s Nut Butter. For stronger protection – if it looks like rain, or you find you’re prone to this, or whatever other reason – a plaster over each nipple is almost fail-safe (except when it falls off); or if you want to get seriously professional, then a purpose-built protector called a Nip Guard may be called for.

Women, by virtue of tightly fitting sports bras, tend to suffer from this less, but be warned, if you run, no nipple is immune.

Because of … motherhood, says Rebecca Schiller

Rebecca Schiller

Are you suddenly super sensitive to your nipples and breasts being touched? Batting away your partner’s hand and wincing as you put on your bra? Tender, tingling breasts with increasingly visible veins can be one of the first signs of pregnancy. If this is you, then it’s probably time for a trip to the chemist.

Breast changes can start as early as six weeks in to pregnancy, but happily the sore nipples phase is usually confined to the first trimester, with some women describing it as an exaggerated version of the heavy tenderness they feel before their period starts. If you choose to continue with your pregnancy, you can expect your breasts to continue to grow, enlarging by at least a couple of cup sizes by the time your baby arrives. Your areola (the circle around your nipple) will grow and darken dramatically, turning it in to a target for your newborn to aim at. The little bumps on your areola (glands, called Montgomery’s tubercles) will be more obvious as they get ready to secrete a protective lubricant for your nipples.

A mother breastfeeding


‘Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain.’ Photograph: Katie Collins/PA

After the birth, cool packs and very tight, supportive, non-wired bras will help get you through engorgement if you aren’t breastfeeding. If you are, then feeding your baby will relieve the pressure in your breasts that should peak approximately four days after birth when your milk comes in. Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain. If your nipples are increasingly sore or become damaged, then get down to your nearest breastfeeding support group or ring the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers helpline swiftly to fine tune your technique as a duo.

Raynaud’s syndrome, thrush or changes to your older baby’s mouth due to teething can also cause temporary nipple pain. Making friends with your local breastfeeding support group early on will give you access to help from people who have seen and experienced it all. They can also advise you on minimising pain and stress whenever you and/or your child are ready to stop.

Why do my nipples hurt? You asked Google – here’s the answer | the panel

Because of … medical reasons, says Dr Ann Robinson

Nipples are sensitive to touch, temperature and vibration – as any breastfeeding mum or nipple-pierced teen will tell you. It’s one of the parts of the body, like the clitoris or earlobes, that has lots of nerve endings that respond to sensation. That’s good when you want to be stimulated but bad when nipples start to ache with no obvious cause.

It’s natural to worry that painful nipples may be a sign of breast cancer, but it hardly ever is. Breast cancer most commonly starts as a painless lump in one breast, though occasionally a breast lump can be tender to touch. A rare condition called Paget’s disease of the nipple causes red, scaly skin (eczema) of one nipple which may itch, burn or bleed. Paget’s is often associated with an underlying cancer and, like other types of breast cancer, is more likely if you are older, female, and have a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. The bottom line is that any man or woman of any age who notices a breast lump or nipple changes should get an urgent medical opinion.

In practice, nipples usually hurt because of tiny cracks (fissures) caused by friction. Jogger’s nipple is a common hazard of long-distance running, and over-enthusiastic sucking by a baby (or sexual partner) can cause the same problem. Many women get cyclical breast pain due to hormonal fluctuations; breasts and nipples feel engorged and tender in the days leading up to a period and then improve dramatically once the period starts.

Non-cyclical breast pain is not well-understood; it doesn’t vary much with the menstrual cycle and may be part of more widespread pain conditions like fibromyalgia or inflammation in the chest wall that lies under the breasts. So nipple tenderness is rarely due to a dangerous underlying condition, but if it doesn’t get better within a few days or you have no idea what’s caused it, it’s definitely worth seeing your GP.

Because of … sex, says Nichi Hodgson

Nichi Hodgson

Nipple play, a long-recorded pleasure in every text from the Kama Sutra to 50 Shades of Grey, is enjoyed by both men and women alike. What makes it so enjoyable are the thousands of nerve endings our nipples contain – even male nipples each contain around 3,000 to 6,000 delicate nerve endings and around 2,000 to 4,000 erogenous nerve endings which are intertwined with the sensory touch receptors. For women, additional sensitivity comes from hormonal changes. Couple this with the fineness of the skin – just under 1mm at the thinnest point – and you begin to understand why yanking, biting or even over-robust tweaking can cause substantial pain.

Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable. It’s worth noting that the ties and weights you sometimes see in BDSM porn are there to create pleasure not when they are loaded on, but when they are released and the blood flows back into the previously restricted area, thereby increasing sensitivity and sensation. If you thought it was all about enduring weight, you can let that preconception go now, for the good of your anatomy.

A scene from Fifty Shades of Grey


‘Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable.’ Photograph: Universal Pictures/PA

The trouble is, even when you’re safely restricting with specially designed nipple ties or clamps (it’s not advisable to use wire, household pegs, or hair clips) it can be hard to know just where the comfortable threshold really lies, something which you only discover you’ve transgressed later when the play is over and the real pain rather than the sensitivity begins to set in. As a rule of thumb, if you’re still feeling the hurt four to six hours later, you’ve overdone it.

Ice wrapped in a suitable compress is best for bruising, lanolin cream for any skin breaking. And if the sensitivity is only slight, incredibly gentle “kissing better” may be an option for women – it’s been shown to cause the release of oxytocin, which acts as a natural painkiller.

Because of … running, says Adharanand Finn

If you’ve ever been out to watch a big running race such as the London marathon, particularly near the end, you will have spotted the guys with the two red circles of blood on their tops, like two gory bullet holes. It has probably made you wince, and for good reason … it hurts like hell. Yet bleeding nipples is quite preventable, and to suffer from it is a rookie mistake.

Nipples bleed from your T-shirt rubbing against them, it’s that simple. And the longer you run, the more likely it is to happen. If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction. Sweating a lot on a hot day has the same effect.

To prevent bleeding, step one: avoid cotton T-shirts, as once they get wet they stay wet, unlike a “technical” running T-shirt which, in the advertising lingo, “wicks moisture away” – they do work, unless it’s a complete downpour. You’re also better off with a tighter-fitting top than with a big, oversized number bouncing around all over the place.

Man jogging in puddle in rural field


‘If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction.’ Photograph: Dave and Les Jacobs/Getty Images/Blend Images

But even on a cool, dry day and with the right T-shirt, bleeding nipples can still be a problem if you run long enough, so, for step two, you would be well advised to go in for some localised protection. The options are many and varied. Vaseline works for a while, as do specialist lube products such as Bodyglide and Squirrel’s Nut Butter. For stronger protection – if it looks like rain, or you find you’re prone to this, or whatever other reason – a plaster over each nipple is almost fail-safe (except when it falls off); or if you want to get seriously professional, then a purpose-built protector called a Nip Guard may be called for.

Women, by virtue of tightly fitting sports bras, tend to suffer from this less, but be warned, if you run, no nipple is immune.

Because of … motherhood, says Rebecca Schiller

Rebecca Schiller

Are you suddenly super sensitive to your nipples and breasts being touched? Batting away your partner’s hand and wincing as you put on your bra? Tender, tingling breasts with increasingly visible veins can be one of the first signs of pregnancy. If this is you, then it’s probably time for a trip to the chemist.

Breast changes can start as early as six weeks in to pregnancy, but happily the sore nipples phase is usually confined to the first trimester, with some women describing it as an exaggerated version of the heavy tenderness they feel before their period starts. If you choose to continue with your pregnancy, you can expect your breasts to continue to grow, enlarging by at least a couple of cup sizes by the time your baby arrives. Your areola (the circle around your nipple) will grow and darken dramatically, turning it in to a target for your newborn to aim at. The little bumps on your areola (glands, called Montgomery’s tubercles) will be more obvious as they get ready to secrete a protective lubricant for your nipples.

A mother breastfeeding


‘Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain.’ Photograph: Katie Collins/PA

After the birth, cool packs and very tight, supportive, non-wired bras will help get you through engorgement if you aren’t breastfeeding. If you are, then feeding your baby will relieve the pressure in your breasts that should peak approximately four days after birth when your milk comes in. Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain. If your nipples are increasingly sore or become damaged, then get down to your nearest breastfeeding support group or ring the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers helpline swiftly to fine tune your technique as a duo.

Raynaud’s syndrome, thrush or changes to your older baby’s mouth due to teething can also cause temporary nipple pain. Making friends with your local breastfeeding support group early on will give you access to help from people who have seen and experienced it all. They can also advise you on minimising pain and stress whenever you and/or your child are ready to stop.

Why do my nipples hurt? You asked Google – here’s the answer | the panel

Because of … medical reasons, says Dr Ann Robinson

Nipples are sensitive to touch, temperature and vibration – as any breastfeeding mum or nipple-pierced teen will tell you. It’s one of the parts of the body, like the clitoris or earlobes, that has lots of nerve endings that respond to sensation. That’s good when you want to be stimulated but bad when nipples start to ache with no obvious cause.

It’s natural to worry that painful nipples may be a sign of breast cancer, but it hardly ever is. Breast cancer most commonly starts as a painless lump in one breast, though occasionally a breast lump can be tender to touch. A rare condition called Paget’s disease of the nipple causes red, scaly skin (eczema) of one nipple which may itch, burn or bleed. Paget’s is often associated with an underlying cancer and, like other types of breast cancer, is more likely if you are older, female, and have a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. The bottom line is that any man or woman of any age who notices a breast lump or nipple changes should get an urgent medical opinion.

In practice, nipples usually hurt because of tiny cracks (fissures) caused by friction. Jogger’s nipple is a common hazard of long-distance running, and over-enthusiastic sucking by a baby (or sexual partner) can cause the same problem. Many women get cyclical breast pain due to hormonal fluctuations; breasts and nipples feel engorged and tender in the days leading up to a period and then improve dramatically once the period starts.

Non-cyclical breast pain is not well-understood; it doesn’t vary much with the menstrual cycle and may be part of more widespread pain conditions like fibromyalgia or inflammation in the chest wall that lies under the breasts. So nipple tenderness is rarely due to a dangerous underlying condition, but if it doesn’t get better within a few days or you have no idea what’s caused it, it’s definitely worth seeing your GP.

Because of … sex, says Nichi Hodgson

Nichi Hodgson

Nipple play, a long-recorded pleasure in every text from the Kama Sutra to 50 Shades of Grey, is enjoyed by both men and women alike. What makes it so enjoyable are the thousands of nerve endings our nipples contain – even male nipples each contain around 3,000 to 6,000 delicate nerve endings and around 2,000 to 4,000 erogenous nerve endings which are intertwined with the sensory touch receptors. For women, additional sensitivity comes from hormonal changes. Couple this with the fineness of the skin – just under 1mm at the thinnest point – and you begin to understand why yanking, biting or even over-robust tweaking can cause substantial pain.

Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable. It’s worth noting that the ties and weights you sometimes see in BDSM porn are there to create pleasure not when they are loaded on, but when they are released and the blood flows back into the previously restricted area, thereby increasing sensitivity and sensation. If you thought it was all about enduring weight, you can let that preconception go now, for the good of your anatomy.

A scene from Fifty Shades of Grey


‘Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable.’ Photograph: Universal Pictures/PA

The trouble is, even when you’re safely restricting with specially designed nipple ties or clamps (it’s not advisable to use wire, household pegs, or hair clips) it can be hard to know just where the comfortable threshold really lies, something which you only discover you’ve transgressed later when the play is over and the real pain rather than the sensitivity begins to set in. As a rule of thumb, if you’re still feeling the hurt four to six hours later, you’ve overdone it.

Ice wrapped in a suitable compress is best for bruising, lanolin cream for any skin breaking. And if the sensitivity is only slight, incredibly gentle “kissing better” may be an option for women – it’s been shown to cause the release of oxytocin, which acts as a natural painkiller.

Because of … running, says Adharanand Finn

If you’ve ever been out to watch a big running race such as the London marathon, particularly near the end, you will have spotted the guys with the two red circles of blood on their tops, like two gory bullet holes. It has probably made you wince, and for good reason … it hurts like hell. Yet bleeding nipples is quite preventable, and to suffer from it is a rookie mistake.

Nipples bleed from your T-shirt rubbing against them, it’s that simple. And the longer you run, the more likely it is to happen. If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction. Sweating a lot on a hot day has the same effect.

To prevent bleeding, step one: avoid cotton T-shirts, as once they get wet they stay wet, unlike a “technical” running T-shirt which, in the advertising lingo, “wicks moisture away” – they do work, unless it’s a complete downpour. You’re also better off with a tighter-fitting top than with a big, oversized number bouncing around all over the place.

Man jogging in puddle in rural field


‘If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction.’ Photograph: Dave and Les Jacobs/Getty Images/Blend Images

But even on a cool, dry day and with the right T-shirt, bleeding nipples can still be a problem if you run long enough, so, for step two, you would be well advised to go in for some localised protection. The options are many and varied. Vaseline works for a while, as do specialist lube products such as Bodyglide and Squirrel’s Nut Butter. For stronger protection – if it looks like rain, or you find you’re prone to this, or whatever other reason – a plaster over each nipple is almost fail-safe (except when it falls off); or if you want to get seriously professional, then a purpose-built protector called a Nip Guard may be called for.

Women, by virtue of tightly fitting sports bras, tend to suffer from this less, but be warned, if you run, no nipple is immune.

Because of … motherhood, says Rebecca Schiller

Rebecca Schiller

Are you suddenly super sensitive to your nipples and breasts being touched? Batting away your partner’s hand and wincing as you put on your bra? Tender, tingling breasts with increasingly visible veins can be one of the first signs of pregnancy. If this is you, then it’s probably time for a trip to the chemist.

Breast changes can start as early as six weeks in to pregnancy, but happily the sore nipples phase is usually confined to the first trimester, with some women describing it as an exaggerated version of the heavy tenderness they feel before their period starts. If you choose to continue with your pregnancy, you can expect your breasts to continue to grow, enlarging by at least a couple of cup sizes by the time your baby arrives. Your areola (the circle around your nipple) will grow and darken dramatically, turning it in to a target for your newborn to aim at. The little bumps on your areola (glands, called Montgomery’s tubercles) will be more obvious as they get ready to secrete a protective lubricant for your nipples.

A mother breastfeeding


‘Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain.’ Photograph: Katie Collins/PA

After the birth, cool packs and very tight, supportive, non-wired bras will help get you through engorgement if you aren’t breastfeeding. If you are, then feeding your baby will relieve the pressure in your breasts that should peak approximately four days after birth when your milk comes in. Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain. If your nipples are increasingly sore or become damaged, then get down to your nearest breastfeeding support group or ring the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers helpline swiftly to fine tune your technique as a duo.

Raynaud’s syndrome, thrush or changes to your older baby’s mouth due to teething can also cause temporary nipple pain. Making friends with your local breastfeeding support group early on will give you access to help from people who have seen and experienced it all. They can also advise you on minimising pain and stress whenever you and/or your child are ready to stop.

Why do my nipples hurt? You asked Google – here’s the answer | the panel

Because of … medical reasons, says Dr Ann Robinson

Nipples are sensitive to touch, temperature and vibration – as any breastfeeding mum or nipple-pierced teen will tell you. It’s one of the parts of the body, like the clitoris or earlobes, that has lots of nerve endings that respond to sensation. That’s good when you want to be stimulated but bad when nipples start to ache with no obvious cause.

It’s natural to worry that painful nipples may be a sign of breast cancer, but it hardly ever is. Breast cancer most commonly starts as a painless lump in one breast, though occasionally a breast lump can be tender to touch. A rare condition called Paget’s disease of the nipple causes red, scaly skin (eczema) of one nipple which may itch, burn or bleed. Paget’s is often associated with an underlying cancer and, like other types of breast cancer, is more likely if you are older, female, and have a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. The bottom line is that any man or woman of any age who notices a breast lump or nipple changes should get an urgent medical opinion.

In practice, nipples usually hurt because of tiny cracks (fissures) caused by friction. Jogger’s nipple is a common hazard of long-distance running, and over-enthusiastic sucking by a baby (or sexual partner) can cause the same problem. Many women get cyclical breast pain due to hormonal fluctuations; breasts and nipples feel engorged and tender in the days leading up to a period and then improve dramatically once the period starts.

Non-cyclical breast pain is not well-understood; it doesn’t vary much with the menstrual cycle and may be part of more widespread pain conditions like fibromyalgia or inflammation in the chest wall that lies under the breasts. So nipple tenderness is rarely due to a dangerous underlying condition, but if it doesn’t get better within a few days or you have no idea what’s caused it, it’s definitely worth seeing your GP.

Because of … sex, says Nichi Hodgson

Nichi Hodgson

Nipple play, a long-recorded pleasure in every text from the Kama Sutra to 50 Shades of Grey, is enjoyed by both men and women alike. What makes it so enjoyable are the thousands of nerve endings our nipples contain – even male nipples each contain around 3,000 to 6,000 delicate nerve endings and around 2,000 to 4,000 erogenous nerve endings which are intertwined with the sensory touch receptors. For women, additional sensitivity comes from hormonal changes. Couple this with the fineness of the skin – just under 1mm at the thinnest point – and you begin to understand why yanking, biting or even over-robust tweaking can cause substantial pain.

Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable. It’s worth noting that the ties and weights you sometimes see in BDSM porn are there to create pleasure not when they are loaded on, but when they are released and the blood flows back into the previously restricted area, thereby increasing sensitivity and sensation. If you thought it was all about enduring weight, you can let that preconception go now, for the good of your anatomy.

A scene from Fifty Shades of Grey


‘Even for the most hardened masochist, nipple play should be pleasurable.’ Photograph: Universal Pictures/PA

The trouble is, even when you’re safely restricting with specially designed nipple ties or clamps (it’s not advisable to use wire, household pegs, or hair clips) it can be hard to know just where the comfortable threshold really lies, something which you only discover you’ve transgressed later when the play is over and the real pain rather than the sensitivity begins to set in. As a rule of thumb, if you’re still feeling the hurt four to six hours later, you’ve overdone it.

Ice wrapped in a suitable compress is best for bruising, lanolin cream for any skin breaking. And if the sensitivity is only slight, incredibly gentle “kissing better” may be an option for women – it’s been shown to cause the release of oxytocin, which acts as a natural painkiller.

Because of … running, says Adharanand Finn

If you’ve ever been out to watch a big running race such as the London marathon, particularly near the end, you will have spotted the guys with the two red circles of blood on their tops, like two gory bullet holes. It has probably made you wince, and for good reason … it hurts like hell. Yet bleeding nipples is quite preventable, and to suffer from it is a rookie mistake.

Nipples bleed from your T-shirt rubbing against them, it’s that simple. And the longer you run, the more likely it is to happen. If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction. Sweating a lot on a hot day has the same effect.

To prevent bleeding, step one: avoid cotton T-shirts, as once they get wet they stay wet, unlike a “technical” running T-shirt which, in the advertising lingo, “wicks moisture away” – they do work, unless it’s a complete downpour. You’re also better off with a tighter-fitting top than with a big, oversized number bouncing around all over the place.

Man jogging in puddle in rural field


‘If it’s raining, that’s also going to increase the likelihood of problems as your T-shirt becomes heavier, causing more friction.’ Photograph: Dave and Les Jacobs/Getty Images/Blend Images

But even on a cool, dry day and with the right T-shirt, bleeding nipples can still be a problem if you run long enough, so, for step two, you would be well advised to go in for some localised protection. The options are many and varied. Vaseline works for a while, as do specialist lube products such as Bodyglide and Squirrel’s Nut Butter. For stronger protection – if it looks like rain, or you find you’re prone to this, or whatever other reason – a plaster over each nipple is almost fail-safe (except when it falls off); or if you want to get seriously professional, then a purpose-built protector called a Nip Guard may be called for.

Women, by virtue of tightly fitting sports bras, tend to suffer from this less, but be warned, if you run, no nipple is immune.

Because of … motherhood, says Rebecca Schiller

Rebecca Schiller

Are you suddenly super sensitive to your nipples and breasts being touched? Batting away your partner’s hand and wincing as you put on your bra? Tender, tingling breasts with increasingly visible veins can be one of the first signs of pregnancy. If this is you, then it’s probably time for a trip to the chemist.

Breast changes can start as early as six weeks in to pregnancy, but happily the sore nipples phase is usually confined to the first trimester, with some women describing it as an exaggerated version of the heavy tenderness they feel before their period starts. If you choose to continue with your pregnancy, you can expect your breasts to continue to grow, enlarging by at least a couple of cup sizes by the time your baby arrives. Your areola (the circle around your nipple) will grow and darken dramatically, turning it in to a target for your newborn to aim at. The little bumps on your areola (glands, called Montgomery’s tubercles) will be more obvious as they get ready to secrete a protective lubricant for your nipples.

A mother breastfeeding


‘Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain.’ Photograph: Katie Collins/PA

After the birth, cool packs and very tight, supportive, non-wired bras will help get you through engorgement if you aren’t breastfeeding. If you are, then feeding your baby will relieve the pressure in your breasts that should peak approximately four days after birth when your milk comes in. Though you might feel some discomfort as you and your baby work out how to breastfeed, you shouldn’t feel much nipple pain. If your nipples are increasingly sore or become damaged, then get down to your nearest breastfeeding support group or ring the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers helpline swiftly to fine tune your technique as a duo.

Raynaud’s syndrome, thrush or changes to your older baby’s mouth due to teething can also cause temporary nipple pain. Making friends with your local breastfeeding support group early on will give you access to help from people who have seen and experienced it all. They can also advise you on minimising pain and stress whenever you and/or your child are ready to stop.

Smog Is Bad, and It Can Hurt Your Health for Decades


Air pollution can increase the risk of premature death, even decades later.

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TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Air pollution can increase the risk of premature death, even decades later, one of the longest running air pollution studies suggests. British scientists found the negative health effects of air pollution—such as a higher risk of lung and heart disease—can persist for more than 30 years. The study authors suggested that more research into the long-term health effects of air pollution—often called smog—is needed. “Air pollution has well established impacts on health, especially on heart and lung disease,” study author Dr. Anna Hansell, from Imperial College London, said in a university news release. “The novel aspects of our study are the very long follow-up time and the very detailed assessment of air pollution exposure, using air-quality measurements going back to the 1970s.” The researchers monitored air pollution levels in areas of England and Wales for nearly 40 years. They estimated pollution levels in 1971, 1981, 1991, and in 2001. From 1971 to 1991, the scientists measured levels of black smoke and sulphur dioxide air pollution. These types of pollution are primarily from burning fossil fuels, such as coal and oil, the researchers said. In addition, the investigators measured particulate air pollution, or tiny particles in the air. This type of pollution is typically associated with natural sources, such as soil and sea salt, as well as industrial and construction activities. These miniscule particles can travel deep into the lungs, and may even be small enough to enter the bloodstream, the researchers said. The investigators also tracked the health of 368,000 people living in the study areas. Lung diseases—such as bronchitis, emphysema, and pneumonia—were the most likely to be tied to exposure to air pollution, as was death from heart disease, the study revealed. The study results showed that for every additional unit of pollution per cubic meter of air that people inhaled in 1971, the risk of death between 2002 and 2009 increased by 2 percent. According to study co-author Rebecca Ghosh, “Putting this in context, an individual who lived in a higher polluted area in 1971 had a 14 percent higher risk of dying in 2002 to 2009 than someone who had lived in a lower polluted area.” More recent air pollution exposure made a bigger difference on health, the study authors said. For each additional unit of pollution that people were exposed to in 2001, the risk of death between 2002 and 2009 increased by 24 percent, the findings showed. Hansell said that more recent exposure to air pollution was more important for health than older exposure. “But we need to do more work on how air pollution affects health over a person’s entire lifetime,” she said. Still, Hansell added, air pollution’s effects on your health are small compared to other risk factors. Someone’s risk of dying early is much more dependent on other aspects of lifestyle, including smoking, exercise levels, weight and medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, she explained. “Our study adds to the weight of evidence that suggests breathing in air pollution isn’t good for us in either the short- or long-term. We need to continue collective efforts to reduce air pollution levels, both in the U.K. and internationally,” Hansell said. The findings were published Feb. 8 in the journal Thorax.More information The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more information on the health effects of air pollution.

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Individuals can hurt medical doctors, as well | Ranjana Srivastava

One day, I realise that it has been months given that I noticed a patient whom I was closely concerned with at the time of his cancer diagnosis. He was pale and shaken for the duration of our first consultation, his wife possessing retreated into a silent planet of her very own it took numerous meetings to tame his fears, plan treatment and return a semblance of normality to his upended existence. I felt relieved when our final meeting ended on a calm note and he expressed gratitude for my concern.

Remembering people conversations, I wonder why he has not returned to see me. Probably he switched medical professionals, clinic days, or healthcare networks, a frequent occurrence in a burdened public hospital in which individuals do not have a main expert and describe considerable tension navigating the healthcare maze. Or perhaps we forgot to send him an appointment and he fell through the cracks. The final patient who stored waiting to hear from us came to interest far too late and died shortly thereafter of disseminated cancer. Yet another female who failed to attend was eventually identified by a neighborhood nurse in a derelict caravan, starved, puzzled and incontinent. On my ultimate visit with her in hospice she wept with joy at having a clean bed and a warm meal. I was consumed with guilt that we hadn’t searched for her much more urgently.

Though healthcare professionals have a tendency to concentrate on people in front of them, such cautionary tales routinely shape our everyday worries about our other individuals. For that reason it is with apprehension that I seem up my absent patient. Reading through his notes I find out that his disease has lately innovative and yet another oncologist has prescribed chemotherapy. Knowing properly how upset numerous sufferers come to feel at their perceived abandonment by their original oncologist when their illness turns into terminal, I immediately call him to express regret at his recurrence, and request how he is doing. Relatively cautiously, he replies he is okay. I wish him luck and hang up feeling relieved that he has not been misplaced to follow up. Our complete exchange must have taken a minute. The repercussions would reverberate significantly longer.

The next day an email lands in my inbox. In it, the patient curtly tells me to get lost. He alleges that my call upset his equanimity since the time for me to show my caring had lapsed. He accuses me of intruding on his privacy and signs off on an angry, even threatening note. It would be an understatement to say that I am blindsided by the vitriol.

I read and reread the accusation, not so much indignant at the diatribe than crushed by the awareness that I have by some means succeeded in distressing a dying patient. Overcome by emotions of humiliation, inadequacy and confusion, I wonder how I misplaced empathy, anything I tell my residents is an integral portion of currently being a medical professional. Component of me is harm that a patient I deeply care about would misinterpret my concern as one thing exploitative. Above all, self-blame roars inside my head.

In the ensuing weeks, on perpetual guard, I keep away from checking on other considerations even though my rational thoughts knows that most of my calls are appreciated and without a doubt, essential due to the fact they rescue some individuals in the nick of time. I double-verify my motive, wonder if somebody else can make the call, or tell myself that individuals know the place to discover support. I quickly realise that my fresh method is a dereliction of duty but nonetheless, I am sobered by the battering my self confidence requires from one particular vigorous incident of rejection.

Considerably is rightly explained about medical doctors who harm their individuals, but when it comes to discussing the ways in which sufferers can harm their physicians, there is mostly silence. But, practically 70% of Australian doctors report written or verbal abuse by patients, and another 30% reporting bodily aggression, with women and youthful trainees getting at certain danger. If there is a failure of magnanimity, or even consideration, in human dealings, it is on the side of both medical doctors and individuals.

Some well being pros endure severe repercussions from these incidents, which includes the loss of life or operate. For numerous far more the accumulation of insults, derogatory comments, casual abuse and disrespect causes an insidious erosion of self confidence and goodwill eventually top to disengagement as a implies of self-insulation.

Despite recognising a duty of care, any medical professional or nurse will tell you that it is much more challenging to repeatedly care for people if you consider they will unexpectedly snub, abuse or assault you. The emergency rooms are a single nicely-recognized location where specialists must constantly be on their guard to ward off nastiness. Several say that their experiences make them far more guarded and clinical than they would like.

Anonymous posts about medical doctors are gaining power in a consumer-driven society exactly where folks fee doctors like they price restaurants. “Run away. Does not realize individuals and kept me waiting”, an unhappy patient posts about an oncologist. Under this, someone emphasizes his finer qualities, his empathy, diligence and ground-breaking investigation on a rare cancer. “He saved my son’s lifestyle when every person else gave up”, a mother writes poignantly.

But the praise does minor to erase the reflexive hurt of an individual who in fact understands his patients far better than most. This oncologist watched his young brother die of the same illness, untreatable at the time. He recognises better than most the extreme suffering of individuals and the existential distress of people left behind. “Nothing at all upsets me far more than men and women saying I really do not get it”, he observes quietly, regarding his brother’s framed photograph that follows him everywhere. As I observe him go about his 16 hour day, I cannot help but wonder no matter whether someday the unthinking criticism that he says he tries to ignore may possibly be his undoing. It would be our typical loss.

Medical doctors virtually always internalise insults that sufferers fling at them, and the insults are getting to be far more personalized and pointed. Some medical professionals really feel resigned a lot of have simply no thought how to respond while other individuals are acutely conscious of not taking advantage of a power imbalance by being challenging or openly dissenting.

It is the uncommon and repeatedly distressed medical doctor who would reluctantly deliver this problem to light and actively look for aid in defraying the serious consequences of harm emotions and frayed self-esteem. These demands are not just unmet, they are unspoken. Yet, why must doctors be any much less sensitive to rejection than sufferers? These unmet requirements contribute more than time to the significantly higher charges of psychological distress and burnout faced by medical professionals.

Do no harm is a tenet instilled into each medical professional from inception. A civil society rightly demands that unscrupulous and unprofessional medical doctors should be taken to activity. But sufferers have a great duty to be sympathetic to the distinctive and complex pressures that medical professionals face, and not hasten to impugn their motives. Medical professionals are no more immune than their patients to the destructive energy of phrases.

When You Demand Antibiotics, You Hurt Us All

The discovery of penicillin was a perceived as a miracle. Guys mortally wounded in war survived. Pneumonia, the Captain of the Guys of Death, acquired a demotion. Infectious illnesses have been a key trigger of death and the war metaphors continued.

But penicillin and the antibiotics that followed moved quickly from treating war wounds and pneumonias to the every day remedy of just about everything. No doubt millions were cured of meningitis, pneumonia, strep throat (with the probable prevention of rheumatic fever), limb-threatening infections. But as vaccination and other public wellness measures enhanced, antibiotics became a lot more frequently noticed in severely unwell hospitalized sufferers (frequently utilized appropriately under the supervision of authorities) and doctors’ offices (often inappropriately).

Antibiotics are losing their miracle skills, and rapidly. Normal selection, with its arsenal of genes and mutations, eventually wins every time, and bacteria develop resistance.

It is my fault, and yours. In spite of the medical facts, our perception of antibiotics as miracle medication persists. They really don’t remedy colds, bronchitis, most ear and sinus infections. There are couple of causes to use them for each day ailments. But men and women becoming folks, the better the urgency, the stronger the belief in miracles. I can’t make your sinuses far better before your trip by giving you a “Z-Pak”. If your cough started out yesterday, there’s not a helluva lot I can do to assist you that your grandma hasn’t already informed you.

But medical professionals want to help people and usually succumb to patient demands. So this is on all of us. If your medical doctor thinks antibiotics will assist you, take them, all of them, to keep away from breeding resistance. If your medical professional says you really don’t require any, say “thank you” for the great news.

With each other we can try to salvage our provide of beneficial antibiotics and stem the tide of super-bugs resistant to everything.