Tag Archives: letters

NHS patients would prefer an op over an app, Mr Hunt | Brief letters

The Women’s Social and Political Union may have started life in Manchester (Museum secures rare relic from the fight for women’s right to vote, 7 September) but the suffragette movement moved to London because, as Christabel Pankhurst said, politicians took more notice of “demonstrations of the feminine bourgeoisie than of the female proletariat”. Its committee rooms, once thronged with Lancashire mill hands, were now packed with ladies in silks and satins, not all of them as sensitive to the plight of their less affluent sisterhood as the champion of rational dress, Lady Harberton.
Don Chapman
Author, Wearing the Trousers: Fashion, Freedom and the Rise of the Modern Woman

Good on Father Alan Everett (‘Lights … signalling faint hope, until floor by floor the darkenss snuffed them out’, 11 September) for placing poetry at the heart of a devastated community and for also providing real practical help and assistance when the Grenfell Tower victims needed it the most. This is indeed a man who cares and has ensured that 14 June 2017 will stay in our minds forever.
Judith A Daniels
Great Yarmouth, Norfolk

Readers heading to the Eclipse nightclub in Brentwood in the hope of an encounter with unlikely country music performer Megan McKenna (Pass notes, 11 September) will be disappointed. The club (formerly the Castle pub) has recently been reduced to a heap of rubble by developers.
David Jobbins
Kelvedon Hatch, Essex

David Redshaw complains that modern evangelical songs sound like Eurovision entries (Letters, 9 September). Actually, if our Eurovision entries were half as tuneful as some of the songs sung at my church, we might actually win it for a change.
Jeremy Muldowney
York

I do not have a smartphone and I would be more impressed by the availability of an op than an app (Hunt promises ‘patient power’ with NHS app, 11 September).
Sue Wallace
Thame, Oxfordshire

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Britain needs more accessible housing | Letters

Demand for accessible homes is growing, yet just 7% of the nation’s housing provides even basic accessibility features. This worrying accessible housing deficit is likely to reach a crisis point as the number of people with disability increases and more of us are living longer. Together we are calling for more action from government, local authorities and developers to ensure new homes are inclusively designed with effective planning for the current and future housing needs of disabled people. Greater understanding and recognition of the long-term financial and social value that inclusive housing can bring is crucial.

Accessible and easily adaptable housing can help cut the length of hospital stays, improve independent living and reduce adaptation costs. Inclusive homes benefit everyone, from older people, to people with mobility problems as well as families with young children. It’s time for housing policy to create an inclusive legacy.
Andrew Gibson Vice-chair, Habinteg
Terrie Alafat Chief executive, Chartered Institute for Housing
Caroline Abrahams Charity director, Age UK
Kate Henderson Chief executive, Town and Country Planning Association
Anna Dixon Chief executive, Centre for Ageing Better
Sue Adams Chief executive, Care and Repair England
David Sinclair Director, International Longevity Centre
Steve White Interim chief executive, Papworth Trust
Jeremy Porteus Managing director, Housing LIN
Malcolm Booth Chief executive, National Federation of Occupational Pensioners
Mike Duggan General secretary, Civil Service Pensioners’ Alliance
Steve Edwards Chief executive, National Association of Retired Police Officers

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Britain needs more accessible housing | Letters

Demand for accessible homes is growing, yet just 7% of the nation’s housing provides even basic accessibility features. This worrying accessible housing deficit is likely to reach a crisis point as the number of people with disability increases and more of us are living longer. Together we are calling for more action from government, local authorities and developers to ensure new homes are inclusively designed with effective planning for the current and future housing needs of disabled people. Greater understanding and recognition of the long-term financial and social value that inclusive housing can bring is crucial.

Accessible and easily adaptable housing can help cut the length of hospital stays, improve independent living and reduce adaptation costs. Inclusive homes benefit everyone, from older people, to people with mobility problems as well as families with young children. It’s time for housing policy to create an inclusive legacy.
Andrew Gibson Vice-chair, Habinteg
Terrie Alafat Chief executive, Chartered Institute for Housing
Caroline Abrahams Charity director, Age UK
Kate Henderson Chief executive, Town and Country Planning Association
Anna Dixon Chief executive, Centre for Ageing Better
Sue Adams Chief executive, Care and Repair England
David Sinclair Director, International Longevity Centre
Steve White Interim chief executive, Papworth Trust
Jeremy Porteus Managing director, Housing LIN
Malcolm Booth Chief executive, National Federation of Occupational Pensioners
Mike Duggan General secretary, Civil Service Pensioners’ Alliance
Steve Edwards Chief executive, National Association of Retired Police Officers

Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Britain needs more accessible housing | Letters

Demand for accessible homes is growing, yet just 7% of the nation’s housing provides even basic accessibility features. This worrying accessible housing deficit is likely to reach a crisis point as the number of people with disability increases and more of us are living longer. Together we are calling for more action from government, local authorities and developers to ensure new homes are inclusively designed with effective planning for the current and future housing needs of disabled people. Greater understanding and recognition of the long-term financial and social value that inclusive housing can bring is crucial.

Accessible and easily adaptable housing can help cut the length of hospital stays, improve independent living and reduce adaptation costs. Inclusive homes benefit everyone, from older people, to people with mobility problems as well as families with young children. It’s time for housing policy to create an inclusive legacy.
Andrew Gibson Vice-chair, Habinteg
Terrie Alafat Chief executive, Chartered Institute for Housing
Caroline Abrahams Charity director, Age UK
Kate Henderson Chief executive, Town and Country Planning Association
Anna Dixon Chief executive, Centre for Ageing Better
Sue Adams Chief executive, Care and Repair England
David Sinclair Director, International Longevity Centre
Steve White Interim chief executive, Papworth Trust
Jeremy Porteus Managing director, Housing LIN
Malcolm Booth Chief executive, National Federation of Occupational Pensioners
Mike Duggan General secretary, Civil Service Pensioners’ Alliance
Steve Edwards Chief executive, National Association of Retired Police Officers

Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Britain needs more accessible housing | Letters

Demand for accessible homes is growing, yet just 7% of the nation’s housing provides even basic accessibility features. This worrying accessible housing deficit is likely to reach a crisis point as the number of people with disability increases and more of us are living longer. Together we are calling for more action from government, local authorities and developers to ensure new homes are inclusively designed with effective planning for the current and future housing needs of disabled people. Greater understanding and recognition of the long-term financial and social value that inclusive housing can bring is crucial.

Accessible and easily adaptable housing can help cut the length of hospital stays, improve independent living and reduce adaptation costs. Inclusive homes benefit everyone, from older people, to people with mobility problems as well as families with young children. It’s time for housing policy to create an inclusive legacy.
Andrew Gibson Vice-chair, Habinteg
Terrie Alafat Chief executive, Chartered Institute for Housing
Caroline Abrahams Charity director, Age UK
Kate Henderson Chief executive, Town and Country Planning Association
Anna Dixon Chief executive, Centre for Ageing Better
Sue Adams Chief executive, Care and Repair England
David Sinclair Director, International Longevity Centre
Steve White Interim chief executive, Papworth Trust
Jeremy Porteus Managing director, Housing LIN
Malcolm Booth Chief executive, National Federation of Occupational Pensioners
Mike Duggan General secretary, Civil Service Pensioners’ Alliance
Steve Edwards Chief executive, National Association of Retired Police Officers

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Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Alcohol awareness and the ‘demon drink’ | Letters

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s report covered in your article (Alcohol firms ‘distorting link with cancer’, 8 September) contains serious allegations about the quality and purpose of the information that Drinkaware provides on cancer and alcohol which we entirely reject. Our website information about alcohol and cancer has been approved in its entirety by Drinkaware’s independent medical advisory panel made up of senior medical and clinical professionals.

The overwhelming medical consensus is that there are many risk factors involved with cancer including alcohol and our information and advice reflects this. The website also leaves people in no doubt as to the links that do exist between alcohol and cancer. The report’s allegations around our breast cancer information are based on a highly selective and partisan reading of the site. Drinkaware has consistently stressed the link between alcohol and breast cancer and the importance of increasing public awareness of the issue.

Cancer affects millions of people worldwide and, in our view, a failure to discuss all of its contributory risk factors would be grossly irresponsible.
Sir Leigh Lewis
Chair of the Drinkaware Trust
Professor Paul Wallace
Chief medical adviser, Drinkaware

You report claims by the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) that drinks industry funded bodies The Portman Group and Drinkaware are failing to properly communicate health risks from alcohol, but fail to point out that the IAS is itself almost entirely funded by, and shares its London headquarters with, the Alliance House Foundation, an organisation with its roots in the temperance movement dating back to the 1850s. Despite its name, the IAS is motivated not by unbiased scientific rigour, but by its moral stance against alcohol.

There is a mature debate to be had on the benefits and harm from alcohol consumption, but that debate is not served by reporting as fact and without question the views of the modern-day successors to Victorian pamphleteers railing outside ale houses at the evils of the “demon drink”.
John Porter
Sutton, Surrey

If alcohol consumption is linked so strongly to so many cancers, why do mortality rates not reflect this? The American College of Cardiology study dated 14 August 2017 indicated that light/moderate drinkers do not appear to have a greater risk of premature death than lifetime abstainers.
David Smyth
London

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Alcohol awareness and the ‘demon drink’ | Letters

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s report covered in your article (Alcohol firms ‘distorting link with cancer’, 8 September) contains serious allegations about the quality and purpose of the information that Drinkaware provides on cancer and alcohol which we entirely reject. Our website information about alcohol and cancer has been approved in its entirety by Drinkaware’s independent medical advisory panel made up of senior medical and clinical professionals.

The overwhelming medical consensus is that there are many risk factors involved with cancer including alcohol and our information and advice reflects this. The website also leaves people in no doubt as to the links that do exist between alcohol and cancer. The report’s allegations around our breast cancer information are based on a highly selective and partisan reading of the site. Drinkaware has consistently stressed the link between alcohol and breast cancer and the importance of increasing public awareness of the issue.

Cancer affects millions of people worldwide and, in our view, a failure to discuss all of its contributory risk factors would be grossly irresponsible.
Sir Leigh Lewis
Chair of the Drinkaware Trust
Professor Paul Wallace
Chief medical adviser, Drinkaware

You report claims by the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) that drinks industry funded bodies The Portman Group and Drinkaware are failing to properly communicate health risks from alcohol, but fail to point out that the IAS is itself almost entirely funded by, and shares its London headquarters with, the Alliance House Foundation, an organisation with its roots in the temperance movement dating back to the 1850s. Despite its name, the IAS is motivated not by unbiased scientific rigour, but by its moral stance against alcohol.

There is a mature debate to be had on the benefits and harm from alcohol consumption, but that debate is not served by reporting as fact and without question the views of the modern-day successors to Victorian pamphleteers railing outside ale houses at the evils of the “demon drink”.
John Porter
Sutton, Surrey

If alcohol consumption is linked so strongly to so many cancers, why do mortality rates not reflect this? The American College of Cardiology study dated 14 August 2017 indicated that light/moderate drinkers do not appear to have a greater risk of premature death than lifetime abstainers.
David Smyth
London

Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Alcohol awareness and the ‘demon drink’ | Letters

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s report covered in your article (Alcohol firms ‘distorting link with cancer’, 8 September) contains serious allegations about the quality and purpose of the information that Drinkaware provides on cancer and alcohol which we entirely reject. Our website information about alcohol and cancer has been approved in its entirety by Drinkaware’s independent medical advisory panel made up of senior medical and clinical professionals.

The overwhelming medical consensus is that there are many risk factors involved with cancer including alcohol and our information and advice reflects this. The website also leaves people in no doubt as to the links that do exist between alcohol and cancer. The report’s allegations around our breast cancer information are based on a highly selective and partisan reading of the site. Drinkaware has consistently stressed the link between alcohol and breast cancer and the importance of increasing public awareness of the issue.

Cancer affects millions of people worldwide and, in our view, a failure to discuss all of its contributory risk factors would be grossly irresponsible.
Sir Leigh Lewis
Chair of the Drinkaware Trust
Professor Paul Wallace
Chief medical adviser, Drinkaware

You report claims by the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) that drinks industry funded bodies The Portman Group and Drinkaware are failing to properly communicate health risks from alcohol, but fail to point out that the IAS is itself almost entirely funded by, and shares its London headquarters with, the Alliance House Foundation, an organisation with its roots in the temperance movement dating back to the 1850s. Despite its name, the IAS is motivated not by unbiased scientific rigour, but by its moral stance against alcohol.

There is a mature debate to be had on the benefits and harm from alcohol consumption, but that debate is not served by reporting as fact and without question the views of the modern-day successors to Victorian pamphleteers railing outside ale houses at the evils of the “demon drink”.
John Porter
Sutton, Surrey

If alcohol consumption is linked so strongly to so many cancers, why do mortality rates not reflect this? The American College of Cardiology study dated 14 August 2017 indicated that light/moderate drinkers do not appear to have a greater risk of premature death than lifetime abstainers.
David Smyth
London

Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Alcohol awareness and the ‘demon drink’ | Letters

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s report covered in your article (Alcohol firms ‘distorting link with cancer’, 8 September) contains serious allegations about the quality and purpose of the information that Drinkaware provides on cancer and alcohol which we entirely reject. Our website information about alcohol and cancer has been approved in its entirety by Drinkaware’s independent medical advisory panel made up of senior medical and clinical professionals.

The overwhelming medical consensus is that there are many risk factors involved with cancer including alcohol and our information and advice reflects this. The website also leaves people in no doubt as to the links that do exist between alcohol and cancer. The report’s allegations around our breast cancer information are based on a highly selective and partisan reading of the site. Drinkaware has consistently stressed the link between alcohol and breast cancer and the importance of increasing public awareness of the issue.

Cancer affects millions of people worldwide and, in our view, a failure to discuss all of its contributory risk factors would be grossly irresponsible.
Sir Leigh Lewis
Chair of the Drinkaware Trust
Professor Paul Wallace
Chief medical adviser, Drinkaware

You report claims by the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) that drinks industry funded bodies The Portman Group and Drinkaware are failing to properly communicate health risks from alcohol, but fail to point out that the IAS is itself almost entirely funded by, and shares its London headquarters with, the Alliance House Foundation, an organisation with its roots in the temperance movement dating back to the 1850s. Despite its name, the IAS is motivated not by unbiased scientific rigour, but by its moral stance against alcohol.

There is a mature debate to be had on the benefits and harm from alcohol consumption, but that debate is not served by reporting as fact and without question the views of the modern-day successors to Victorian pamphleteers railing outside ale houses at the evils of the “demon drink”.
John Porter
Sutton, Surrey

If alcohol consumption is linked so strongly to so many cancers, why do mortality rates not reflect this? The American College of Cardiology study dated 14 August 2017 indicated that light/moderate drinkers do not appear to have a greater risk of premature death than lifetime abstainers.
David Smyth
London

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Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Knocked out by Strike – The Cuckoo’s Calling | Letters

Aditya Chakrabortty worries about academics who “turn inequality into an abstraction” (Opinion, 1 September). To find academics who devote their lives to applying theoretical rigour to solving practical problems of inequality we recommend the acknowledgements page of Inequality: What Can Be Done. This is the last book published by our late father, Tony Atkinson (who would have been 73 this month). The book has been translated into 15 languages and profits have been donated to charities fighting poverty and inequality in the UK and abroad.
Richard, Sarah and Charles Atkinson
Oxford

Great to see a man and his prosthetic leg featuring so prominently in BBC1’s dramatisation of Robert Galbraith/JK Rowling’s Strike – The Cuckoo’s Calling (Letters, 30 August) – and to see it used as a defensive weapon too. Could we have a drama with a woman who wears a prosthetic leg soon, please? Can she be characterful rather than beautiful, and not a victim?
Miranda Cox (prosthetic leg wearer)
Bideford, Devon

I had a heart transplant almost 20 years ago at the brilliant QEH in Birmingham (Reticence on giving organs costs 457 lives a year, 4 September). Transplantation works. I would urge everyone to press for an opt-out donor system. You are more likely to need an organ than to give one. Meanwhile, make sure you are on the donor register and have discussed your wishes with loved ones.
Jan Andrews
Bristol

My father fought in the first world war (Letters, 4 September). They were being drilled for the arrival of a dignitary. “Officers will shout Hoo-rah”, they were instructed. “Men will shout Hoo-ray”.
John Branfield
Truro, Cornwall

Surely such a tech-savvy author would have kept a backup (Pratchett’s unfinished novels, 31 August)?
Dave Headey
Faringdon, Oxfordshire

Great to see three bridges over the Forth (Report, 30 August). What will they call the next one?
Bob Hughes
Willoughby, Warwickshire

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