Tag Archives: letters

Surgeon who signed livers is punished but managers let off | Letters

I am an altruistic kidney donor and am appalled at the treatment of Simon Bramhall, the surgeon who initialled two livers in transplant operations (Surgeon fined £10,000 for signing his initials on livers of two transplant patients, 12 January).

I am particularly incensed at the comments of the judge and the whingeing of Patient A. For the judge to call it “an abuse of power and betrayal of trust” borders on the ludicrous.

If anything, they were acts of elation after two very difficult successful operations – the equivalent of a footballer pulling off his jersey after scoring a great goal.

And for Patient A to suffer an “overwhelming feeling of violation” is beyond ludicrous. Mr Bramhall had just saved your life! He did nothing to you. It was not your liver. It was the liver of a dead person who bequeathed it to you: a final act of great generosity. Where is your generosity?

If my brilliant Sheffield surgeon, Mr Shrestha, had initialled my kidney I would have been delighted. It would have been a celebration of a successful partnership between a gifted doctor and a donor to give someone a better life.

What has happened to this country that people take exception so easily, and any deviation from the norm draws so much approbation?
John Carlisle
Sheffield

In sentencing former Queen Elizabeth hospital surgeon Simon Bramhall, Judge Paul Farrer QC described those actions, which resulted in no physical harm, as “conduct born of professional arrogance of such magnitude that it strayed into criminal behaviour”.

Less than two years ago, your newspaper highlighted the Care Quality Commission’s damning report into cardiac surgery at the Queen Elizabeth hospital in Birmingham, estimating that 17 patients may have died unnecessarily as a result of the hospital’s failure to heed repeated patient safety warnings.

Yet no member of the hospital’s executive team has been held to account for their failings.

The contrast is striking: we are forced to conclude that, even where patient safety is at stake, there is one rule for the individual clinician, another for his or her organisation.

Less than five years since the publication of his report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS foundation trust public inquiry, the words of another QC, Robert Francis, appear to have already been forgotten.
Dr Richard Horton
Wolverhampton

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Surgeon who signed livers is punished but managers let off | Letters

I am an altruistic kidney donor and am appalled at the treatment of Simon Bramhall, the surgeon who initialled two livers in transplant operations (Surgeon fined £10,000 for signing his initials on livers of two transplant patients, 12 January).

I am particularly incensed at the comments of the judge and the whingeing of Patient A. For the judge to call it “an abuse of power and betrayal of trust” borders on the ludicrous.

If anything, they were acts of elation after two very difficult successful operations – the equivalent of a footballer pulling off his jersey after scoring a great goal.

And for Patient A to suffer an “overwhelming feeling of violation” is beyond ludicrous. Mr Bramhall had just saved your life! He did nothing to you. It was not your liver. It was the liver of a dead person who bequeathed it to you: a final act of great generosity. Where is your generosity?

If my brilliant Sheffield surgeon, Mr Shrestha, had initialled my kidney I would have been delighted. It would have been a celebration of a successful partnership between a gifted doctor and a donor to give someone a better life.

What has happened to this country that people take exception so easily, and any deviation from the norm draws so much approbation?
John Carlisle
Sheffield

In sentencing former Queen Elizabeth hospital surgeon Simon Bramhall, Judge Paul Farrer QC described those actions, which resulted in no physical harm, as “conduct born of professional arrogance of such magnitude that it strayed into criminal behaviour”.

Less than two years ago, your newspaper highlighted the Care Quality Commission’s damning report into cardiac surgery at the Queen Elizabeth hospital in Birmingham, estimating that 17 patients may have died unnecessarily as a result of the hospital’s failure to heed repeated patient safety warnings.

Yet no member of the hospital’s executive team has been held to account for their failings.

The contrast is striking: we are forced to conclude that, even where patient safety is at stake, there is one rule for the individual clinician, another for his or her organisation.

Less than five years since the publication of his report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS foundation trust public inquiry, the words of another QC, Robert Francis, appear to have already been forgotten.
Dr Richard Horton
Wolverhampton

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Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Surgeon who signed livers is punished but managers let off | Letters

I am an altruistic kidney donor and am appalled at the treatment of Simon Bramhall, the surgeon who initialled two livers in transplant operations (Surgeon fined £10,000 for signing his initials on livers of two transplant patients, 12 January).

I am particularly incensed at the comments of the judge and the whingeing of Patient A. For the judge to call it “an abuse of power and betrayal of trust” borders on the ludicrous.

If anything, they were acts of elation after two very difficult successful operations – the equivalent of a footballer pulling off his jersey after scoring a great goal.

And for Patient A to suffer an “overwhelming feeling of violation” is beyond ludicrous. Mr Bramhall had just saved your life! He did nothing to you. It was not your liver. It was the liver of a dead person who bequeathed it to you: a final act of great generosity. Where is your generosity?

If my brilliant Sheffield surgeon, Mr Shrestha, had initialled my kidney I would have been delighted. It would have been a celebration of a successful partnership between a gifted doctor and a donor to give someone a better life.

What has happened to this country that people take exception so easily, and any deviation from the norm draws so much approbation?
John Carlisle
Sheffield

In sentencing former Queen Elizabeth hospital surgeon Simon Bramhall, Judge Paul Farrer QC described those actions, which resulted in no physical harm, as “conduct born of professional arrogance of such magnitude that it strayed into criminal behaviour”.

Less than two years ago, your newspaper highlighted the Care Quality Commission’s damning report into cardiac surgery at the Queen Elizabeth hospital in Birmingham, estimating that 17 patients may have died unnecessarily as a result of the hospital’s failure to heed repeated patient safety warnings.

Yet no member of the hospital’s executive team has been held to account for their failings.

The contrast is striking: we are forced to conclude that, even where patient safety is at stake, there is one rule for the individual clinician, another for his or her organisation.

Less than five years since the publication of his report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS foundation trust public inquiry, the words of another QC, Robert Francis, appear to have already been forgotten.
Dr Richard Horton
Wolverhampton

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Death and the cruel process that follows | Letters

Annalisa Barbieri was lucky to have been able to keep her father at home for 11 hours after he died (Family, 6 January). I found my mother (aged 90) who had died in her sleep at home. Not knowing what to do, I rang her GP. This started a legal process that whisked her body away before I had time to say goodbye. Because she did not die in hospital or hospice and hadn’t seen her GP in the last two weeks, the GP was required to contact the police, who had to come and keep guard on the body until the undertakers came to take it away, I assume in case she’d been murdered. They couldn’t even wait for my sister to arrive to see my mother dead in her bed.

If I’d been warned that this would happen, I would have spent an hour or two quietly with my mother’s body before I rang the GP.

It would be good to publicise this system so that others don’t have the same experience. Everyone was kind, but the process is cruel.
Christine Holloway
Winchester

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Death and the cruel process that follows | Letters

Annalisa Barbieri was lucky to have been able to keep her father at home for 11 hours after he died (Family, 6 January). I found my mother (aged 90) who had died in her sleep at home. Not knowing what to do, I rang her GP. This started a legal process that whisked her body away before I had time to say goodbye. Because she did not die in hospital or hospice and hadn’t seen her GP in the last two weeks, the GP was required to contact the police, who had to come and keep guard on the body until the undertakers came to take it away, I assume in case she’d been murdered. They couldn’t even wait for my sister to arrive to see my mother dead in her bed.

If I’d been warned that this would happen, I would have spent an hour or two quietly with my mother’s body before I rang the GP.

It would be good to publicise this system so that others don’t have the same experience. Everyone was kind, but the process is cruel.
Christine Holloway
Winchester

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Death and the cruel process that follows | Letters

Annalisa Barbieri was lucky to have been able to keep her father at home for 11 hours after he died (Family, 6 January). I found my mother (aged 90) who had died in her sleep at home. Not knowing what to do, I rang her GP. This started a legal process that whisked her body away before I had time to say goodbye. Because she did not die in hospital or hospice and hadn’t seen her GP in the last two weeks, the GP was required to contact the police, who had to come and keep guard on the body until the undertakers came to take it away, I assume in case she’d been murdered. They couldn’t even wait for my sister to arrive to see my mother dead in her bed.

If I’d been warned that this would happen, I would have spent an hour or two quietly with my mother’s body before I rang the GP.

It would be good to publicise this system so that others don’t have the same experience. Everyone was kind, but the process is cruel.
Christine Holloway
Winchester

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Death and the cruel process that follows | Letters

Annalisa Barbieri was lucky to have been able to keep her father at home for 11 hours after he died (Family, 6 January). I found my mother (aged 90) who had died in her sleep at home. Not knowing what to do, I rang her GP. This started a legal process that whisked her body away before I had time to say goodbye. Because she did not die in hospital or hospice and hadn’t seen her GP in the last two weeks, the GP was required to contact the police, who had to come and keep guard on the body until the undertakers came to take it away, I assume in case she’d been murdered. They couldn’t even wait for my sister to arrive to see my mother dead in her bed.

If I’d been warned that this would happen, I would have spent an hour or two quietly with my mother’s body before I rang the GP.

It would be good to publicise this system so that others don’t have the same experience. Everyone was kind, but the process is cruel.
Christine Holloway
Winchester

Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Death and the cruel process that follows | Letters

Annalisa Barbieri was lucky to have been able to keep her father at home for 11 hours after he died (Family, 6 January). I found my mother (aged 90) who had died in her sleep at home. Not knowing what to do, I rang her GP. This started a legal process that whisked her body away before I had time to say goodbye. Because she did not die in hospital or hospice and hadn’t seen her GP in the last two weeks, the GP was required to contact the police, who had to come and keep guard on the body until the undertakers came to take it away, I assume in case she’d been murdered. They couldn’t even wait for my sister to arrive to see my mother dead in her bed.

If I’d been warned that this would happen, I would have spent an hour or two quietly with my mother’s body before I rang the GP.

It would be good to publicise this system so that others don’t have the same experience. Everyone was kind, but the process is cruel.
Christine Holloway
Winchester

Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Read more Guardian letters – click here to visit gu.com/letters

Death and the cruel process that follows | Letters

Annalisa Barbieri was lucky to have been able to keep her father at home for 11 hours after he died (Family, 6 January). I found my mother (aged 90) who had died in her sleep at home. Not knowing what to do, I rang her GP. This started a legal process that whisked her body away before I had time to say goodbye. Because she did not die in hospital or hospice and hadn’t seen her GP in the last two weeks, the GP was required to contact the police, who had to come and keep guard on the body until the undertakers came to take it away, I assume in case she’d been murdered. They couldn’t even wait for my sister to arrive to see my mother dead in her bed.

If I’d been warned that this would happen, I would have spent an hour or two quietly with my mother’s body before I rang the GP.

It would be good to publicise this system so that others don’t have the same experience. Everyone was kind, but the process is cruel.
Christine Holloway
Winchester

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We need to raise taxes to fund our care needs | Letters

The obvious answer to saving the NHS is to train and recruit more care workers in both the NHS and social care – which would not only (alone) meet current crying care needs but provide good professional human-interface jobs in the coming hi-tech age (killing two currently worrying birds with one stone). This does, however, mean raising more public revenue by getting people to pay more taxes.

But to achieve this we must first counter the common idea that providing something that people want, and raising the revenue to provide it by appropriate pricing, is a clear case of “positive wealth creation” if done in the private sector – not only creating wealth for the sector in question (which may be private healthcare, as in the US) but stimulating activity in the rest of the economy – but is simply a “negative burden” if done in the public sector.

Providing separate healthcare budgets, linking specific tax increases to specific public care improvements (disinterring what we need to pay for care from more general taxation), which I think Chris Ham is recommending, may be the best way to get people to focus on the real issues. But until the debilitating myth of private good / public doubtful is scotched, we will not reach square one in solving our current healthcare crisis.
Bernard Cummings
Erith, Kent

It is now time for all opposition parties to combine to bring maximum pressure on the government to end the ever increasing and costly privatisation of the NHS and increase general taxation to pay for it. I think most people would agree to a tax that was hypothecated for the NHS and social care. Part of the problem the NHS is experiencing is due to bed blocking caused by such large cuts to social care.
Valerie Crews
Beckenham, Kent

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