Tag Archives: Mental

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Half of pupils expelled from school have mental health issue, study finds

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

The majority will end up in prison, says the study by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which estimates that of the 86,000-strong prison population, more then 54,000 were excluded at school.

The IPPR says its research lays bare the “broken system” facing excluded pupils. It flags up high levels of mental health issues among permanently excluded students – at least one in two, compared with one in 50 pupils in the wider population.

The thinktank also highlights the disadvantages such children face, as those excluded are four times more likely to grow up in poverty and twice as likely to be living in care. They are also seven times more likely to have special educational needs than those who are not excluded, the report claims.

After exclusion, the study says there is a downward spiral of underachievement, with teachers in schools catering for excluded pupils twice as likely to have no educational qualifications.

Kiran Gill, an IPPR associate fellow and founder of The Difference, which works to improve mental health provision for excluded pupils, described the system as “burningly unjust”.

She said: “Theresa May says she is committed to improving the mental health of young people. Addressing the most vulnerable children being thrown out of England’s schools is a good place to start. Because unequal treatment of mental health may be an injustice, but the discrimination of school exclusions is a crime.

“If the government is serious about real action on mental health, there needs to be dedicated funding and thought through solutions rather than sticking plasters on the symptoms of the problem.”

The IPPR research was published before the government’s latest annual figures on permanent and fixed period exclusions from schools in England in 2015-16, which is scheduled to be released on Thursday.

Responding to the report, the Department for Education said any decision to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair, and should only be used as a last resort in response to serious breaches of a school’s behaviour policy.

“This government is committed to working with local authorities and schools to ensure children in alternative provision receive a high quality education,” a DfE spokesperson said.

“We are strengthening the links between schools and NHS mental health staff and have announced plans for every secondary school to be offered mental health first aid training. Later this year we will publish a green paper with proposals for further improving mental health services.”

  • In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here

Rise in children seeking mental health support after terror attacks

The number of children and young people seeking help from mental health services has spiked in the wake of recent terrorist attacks in England, according to the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP).

Hospitals across the Manchester region have seen an estimated 10% increase in children seeking help since a bomb ripped through the Manchester Arena on 22 May, killing 22 people, according to the RCP. Mental health experts in Greater Manchester hospitals received hundreds more patients from June to July compared with previous months.

Dr Louise Theodosiou, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at Royal Manchester children’s hospital and a member of the RCP, described the increase as significant and said the terror attack had a “profound impact on the way the children view their city”.

Just a small fraction of those treated had been at the concert; the majority of patients had felt increased anxiety after watching the events on the news. Anxiety and insomnia were the most common complaints, with children worrying about going out or being on public transport after the attacks.

Theodosiou warned the number affected could be significantly greater, with people also seeking support through school or voluntary services and many others yet to come forward for help.

A similar trend has been noticed in London. Dr Jon Goldin, the vice-chair of the child and adolescent psychiatry faculty at RCP, said there had also been anecdotal evidence of “a rise in children seeking mental health services after recent terror attacks”.

“Maybe the rise hasn’t been as much as Manchester [...] but some of those with a predisposition to anxiety have had it heightened by these recent events,” he said.

The increase could be linked to young people’s consumption of media, with children able to access disturbing footage on their smartphones, according to experts. It could also be a positive sign that efforts to reduce the stigma around mental health were having an impact.

Dr Rachel Langley, a clinical psychologist from Southampton children’s hospital’s sleepdisorder service, said: “Technology has a huge amount to answer for in fuelling a rise in children’s sleep problems. It gives young people access to what is going on in the world and also … the blue light of the screens affects melatonin release.”

She added: “There was a 10-year-old boy I saw recently who has anxiety-related insomnia and he has a specific concern about his dad, who works in London, getting caught up in a terror attack.”

In Manchester more young people are expected to seek help in the coming months and years. Theodosiou said: “It has unmasked vulnerabilities that were not there before. It’s fair to say that of the hundreds of children affected only a small fraction would have witnessed the events.”

She added: “If you think of the bomb as being like an influenza epidemic, those most affected by that will be ones with underlying respiratory problems [...] and in the same way the group most affected by the terror attack in the city have been those who are vulnerable to mental health at the beginning.”

Peter Sweeney, another psychiatrist from Royal Manchester children’s hospital, said services needed to plan ahead to manage post-traumatic stress disorder that could hit families and young people.

“We needed to do lots of work for the survivors initially … they got a high level of support at the start. Our concern now is more about young people who may be experiencing anxiety but are not presenting to us, so those who were at the concert but not seriously injured or those who were not at the concert but affected,” he said.

The message to children should be that these attacks should not alter behaviour and that people should get on with their normal lives, said Goldin. “Children should get that message as well as adults. If you have anxious parents saying ‘don’t go to London etc’ then that doesn’t give the most helpful message.

“One message to get across is that it’s important not to feel that, when a child is anxious about a terror attack, they should be taken straight to children’s mental health services. Usually family and a normal support network can really help them. When things are more enduring, for example several weeks after a traumatic experience a child is still struggling with sleep or their mood etc, then you would want CAMHS [child and adolescent mental health services] to get involved.”

  • In the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123, and Childline on 0800 1111. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here.

Rise in children seeking mental health support after terror attacks

The number of children and young people seeking help from mental health services has spiked in the wake of recent terrorist attacks in England, according to the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP).

Hospitals across the Manchester region have seen an estimated 10% increase in children seeking help since a bomb ripped through the Manchester Arena on 22 May, killing 22 people, according to the RCP. Mental health experts in Greater Manchester hospitals received hundreds more patients from June to July compared with previous months.

Dr Louise Theodosiou, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at Royal Manchester children’s hospital and a member of the RCP, described the increase as significant and said the terror attack had a “profound impact on the way the children view their city”.

Just a small fraction of those treated had been at the concert; the majority of patients had felt increased anxiety after watching the events on the news. Anxiety and insomnia were the most common complaints, with children worrying about going out or being on public transport after the attacks.

Theodosiou warned the number affected could be significantly greater, with people also seeking support through school or voluntary services and many others yet to come forward for help.

A similar trend has been noticed in London. Dr Jon Goldin, the vice-chair of the child and adolescent psychiatry faculty at RCP, said there had also been anecdotal evidence of “a rise in children seeking mental health services after recent terror attacks”.

“Maybe the rise hasn’t been as much as Manchester [...] but some of those with a predisposition to anxiety have had it heightened by these recent events,” he said.

The increase could be linked to young people’s consumption of media, with children able to access disturbing footage on their smartphones, according to experts. It could also be a positive sign that efforts to reduce the stigma around mental health were having an impact.

Dr Rachel Langley, a clinical psychologist from Southampton children’s hospital’s sleepdisorder service, said: “Technology has a huge amount to answer for in fuelling a rise in children’s sleep problems. It gives young people access to what is going on in the world and also … the blue light of the screens affects melatonin release.”

She added: “There was a 10-year-old boy I saw recently who has anxiety-related insomnia and he has a specific concern about his dad, who works in London, getting caught up in a terror attack.”

In Manchester more young people are expected to seek help in the coming months and years. Theodosiou said: “It has unmasked vulnerabilities that were not there before. It’s fair to say that of the hundreds of children affected only a small fraction would have witnessed the events.”

She added: “If you think of the bomb as being like an influenza epidemic, those most affected by that will be ones with underlying respiratory problems [...] and in the same way the group most affected by the terror attack in the city have been those who are vulnerable to mental health at the beginning.”

Peter Sweeney, another psychiatrist from Royal Manchester children’s hospital, said services needed to plan ahead to manage post-traumatic stress disorder that could hit families and young people.

“We needed to do lots of work for the survivors initially … they got a high level of support at the start. Our concern now is more about young people who may be experiencing anxiety but are not presenting to us, so those who were at the concert but not seriously injured or those who were not at the concert but affected,” he said.

The message to children should be that these attacks should not alter behaviour and that people should get on with their normal lives, said Goldin. “Children should get that message as well as adults. If you have anxious parents saying ‘don’t go to London etc’ then that doesn’t give the most helpful message.

“One message to get across is that it’s important not to feel that, when a child is anxious about a terror attack, they should be taken straight to children’s mental health services. Usually family and a normal support network can really help them. When things are more enduring, for example several weeks after a traumatic experience a child is still struggling with sleep or their mood etc, then you would want CAMHS [child and adolescent mental health services] to get involved.”

  • In the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123, and Childline on 0800 1111. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here.

Terrorism blamed for rise in children seeking mental health support

The number of children and young people seeking help from mental health services has spiked in the wake of recent terror attacks in England, according to the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP).

Hospitals across the Manchester region have seen an estimated 10% increase in children seeking help since a bomb ripped through the Manchester Arena on 22 May, killing 22 people, according to the RCP. Mental health experts in Greater Manchester hospitals received hundreds more patients from June to July compared with previous months.

Dr Louise Theodosiou, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at Royal Manchester children’s hospital and a member of the RCP, described the increase as significant and said the terror attack had a “profound impact on the way the children view their city”.

Just a small fraction of those treated had been at the concert; the majority of patients had felt increased anxiety after watching the events on the news. Anxiety and insomnia were the most common complaints, with children worrying about going out or being on public transport after the attacks.

Theodosiou warned the number affected could be significantly greater, with people also seeking support through school or voluntary services and many others yet to come forward for help.

A similar trend has been noticed in London. Dr Jon Goldin, the vice-chair of the child and adolescent psychiatry faculty at RCP, said there had also been anecdotal evidence of “a rise in children seeking mental health services after recent terror attacks”.

“Maybe the rise hasn’t been as much as Manchester [...] but some of those with a predisposition to anxiety have had it heightened by these recent events,” he said.

The increase could be linked to young people’s consumption of media, with children able to access disturbing footage on their smartphones, according to experts. It could also be a positive sign that efforts to reduce the stigma around mental health were having an impact.

Dr Rachel Langley, a clinical psychologist from Southampton children’s hospital’s sleepdisorder service, said: “Technology has a huge amount to answer for in fuelling a rise in children’s sleep problems. It gives young people access to what is going on in the world and also … the blue light of the screens affects melatonin release.”

She added: “There was a 10-year-old boy I saw recently who has anxiety-related insomnia and he has a specific concern about his dad, who works in London, getting caught up in a terror attack.”

In Manchester more young people are expected to seek help in the coming months and years. Theodosiou said: “It has unmasked vulnerabilities that were not there before. It’s fair to say that of the hundreds of children affected only a small fraction would have witnessed the events.”

She added: “If you think of the bomb as being like an influenza epidemic, those most affected by that will be ones with underlying respiratory problems [...] and in the same way the group most affected by the terror attack in the city have been those who are vulnerable to mental health at the beginning.”

Peter Sweeney, another psychiatrist from Royal Manchester children’s hospital, said services needed to plan ahead to manage post-traumatic stress disorder that could hit families and young people.

“We needed to do lots of work for the survivors initially … they got a high level of support at the start. Our concern now is more about young people who may be experiencing anxiety but are not presenting to us, so those who were at the concert but not seriously injured or those who were not at the concert but affected,” he said.

The message to children should be that these attacks should not alter behaviour and that people should get on with their normal lives, said Goldin. “Children should get that message as well as adults. If you have anxious parents saying ‘don’t go to London etc’ then that doesn’t give the most helpful message.

“One message to get across is that it’s important not to feel that, when a child is anxious about a terror attack, they should be taken straight to children’s mental health services. Usually family and a normal support network can really help them. When things are more enduring, for example several weeks after a traumatic experience a child is still struggling with sleep or their mood etc, then you would want CAMHS [child and adolescent mental health services] to get involved.”

  • In the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123, and Childline on 0800 1111. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Hotlines in other countries can be found here.

How to manage mental health at work

In recent months, a number of high-profile figures have spoken frankly about their experiences of mental health. Prince Harry has disclosed the anxiety and panic attacks he experienced following the sudden death of his mother, while former England cricketer Freddie Flintoff and rapper Professor Green have also both opened up about their mental health.

Experts welcome such open discussions on mental health, which has been a taboo subject for far too long. “It’s great that more people feel able to talk about their mental health,” says Madeleine McGivern, head of workplace wellbeing programmes at the charity Mind. “There is still a long way to go – especially in many workplaces – but things are definitely moving in the right direction.”

Hilda Burke, a psychotherapist, life coach and couples’ counsellor at her practice Hilda Burke Psychotherapy, agrees. She says there has been more awareness generally. “Several clients have come my way after their managers have offered to fund some short-term therapy.”

This move to more open discussions on the subject comes as two-thirds of British adults have admitted to having experienced mental ill-health at some point in their lives, according to research published by the Mental Health Foundation. In the Queen’s speech last month, the government set out details on how it plans to improve mental health services but failed to provide any further information on the additional 10,000 extra staff for the sector, as outlined in its manifesto.

Don’t sweep it under the carpet

For those experiencing mental health issues, do try to approach your employer about your concerns. “You don’t have to be specific,” says Andy Silvester, head of campaigns and deputy director of policy at the Institute of Directors (IoD). “Say that you think you could benefit from some time off to seek advice from the many charities and providers that are out there. You’d be surprised how often employers are open to those conversations.”

If you are thinking of speaking to a colleague or manager for the first time about your mental health, think about how and when you do this, says McGivern. “Once you have this conversation, it can’t be ‘unsaid’, so it’s important you feel secure and safe in disclosing your mental health problem.”


There is still a long way to go, but things are definitely moving in the right direction

Madeleine McGivern

If you don’t speak out, you’re potentially denying yourself support, warns Burke. “I work with many clients for whom anxiety and panic attacks are something that they struggle with at work,” she says. “A key issue, I believe, facing these clients is shame around admitting to some of these conditions and so rather than having an open and frank discussion with their employers they invest a lot of energy in trying to hide their symptoms.”

Switch off after work

One of the biggest issues facing employees in relation to their mental wellbeing is the inability to switch off after work, with smartphones continually pinging with email notifications.

“How we manage the great flexibility and new opportunities that technology and digital advancement gives us is also really important to ensuring that we have some time to switch off from work, and maintain a good work-life balance – both of which are important in terms of wellbeing,” says McGivern.

Knowing when it’s getting too much is crucial. “Think about what keeps you well at work, and the signs you’ll recognise in yourself if you start to struggle,” says McGivern. “If you can, communicate this to your manager. Either way, make sure you keep a support network outside of work, and try to maintain a proper balance between work and life.”

As well as having an honest conversation with your manager about your mental health situation, also be truthful to yourself about your needs, says Gillian Connor, head of policy partnerships at the charity Rethink Mental Illness. “Whether that’s going out for a lunchtime walk, leaving on time, not taking work home with you.”

Burke agrees: “Having healthy boundaries in place at work, knowing when it’s getting too much and being able to create space for ourselves is crucial for good mental health.”

Making changes in the workplace

Workplaces need to become mental-health friendly, argues Connor. “This will help more people feel comfortable about disclosing when they have a health problem,” she says. “It’s also important that employers themselves understand their responsibilities under the law, as well as other steps they can take to get the best out of a diverse workforce. Outside the workplace, we need better access to services – such as talking therapies – as well as improved attitudes towards mental illness.”

Silvester also suggests publicising “a formal mental health policy which says something to the effect that nobody will be stigmatised”, such as putting up Time to Change [the mental health campaign run by Rethink Mental Illness] or Mind posters around the office.

Mental illness also impacts the self-employed

When some people think of mental illness at work, they immediately think of the office environment. But being ill at work isn’t confined to the office. As a self-employed person or freelancer, the demands of juggling your own company often with no clear work-life divide can be very stressful.

Silvester says the IoD’s research has found that there were plenty of self-employed people experiencing mental health issues. “Working for yourself isn’t a silver bullet to ensure good mental health,” he says.

Despite the challenges of working in an office, Craig Jackson, a professor of occupational health psychology and head of psychology at Birmingham City University, is keen to add that there are benefits to working life: “We should remember that work also provides many benefits for individuals – psychological, emotional, cognitive, social.”

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