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New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants

New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery.

The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe.

Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealand radio station: “We’re always cautious about the use of the word ‘ban’, but effectively the companies are agreeing no longer to sell these products … in New Zealand from the 4th of January.”

The move goes considerably further than recent announcements in other countries, such as Australia and the UK, which only restrict the use of pelvic mesh operations for organ prolapse. In New Zealand, the use of mesh implants to treat urinary incontinence, which accounts for the vast majority of mesh operations, will also be effectively banned, according to an announcement posted on the government website.

The decision has been applauded by campaigners, many of whom argue that the potential complications of mesh surgery, which include chronic pain and implants cutting through the vagina, are unacceptable. However, doctors expressed concern at the far-reaching nature of the ban.

It is now widely accepted that vaginal mesh should not be routinely offered for prolapse, where the pelvic organs bulge into the vagina. But many doctors maintain that mesh surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence can have advantages over traditional surgery and believe that these procedures should continue to be offered.

“This makes New Zealand the only country in the world to have banned all of these procedures and will leave women without effective surgical options for these debilitating conditions,” said Giovanni Losco, a urologist in Christchurch and spokesman for the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand.

Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, says the medical profession needs to acknowledge that there have been major failings in regulation and act to address the issue. If they don’t then other regulators may also react with outright bans.

“[New Zealand] is basically saying ‘we can’t guarantee patient safety’,” he added.

Jessamine said that the decision had been taken after reviewing data on mesh safety provided in November by the Australian government, which had been carrying out its own inquiry into the use of pelvic implants. “We’ve reviewed that data and come to the opinion that the data is sound and we now believe the risks of the use of these products in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweighs the benefits,” he said.

“We’ve got an ability within our legislation to limit the use of those products, to discourage and ultimately remove those products from the market,” he added.

Owen Smith, a shadow cabinet minister, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants, described the announcement as “hugely significant”. “It’s the first major country to effectively ban mesh for all pelvic operations. It’s precisely what we’ve been calling for in the UK.”

Women harmed because vaginal mesh regulation ‘not fit for purpose’

Women have been exposed to unnecessary harm due to poor regulation for vaginal mesh products, medical experts have warned.

The team, from the University of Oxford, have called for clinical trials to be made mandatory for invasive medical devices and for a registry to be created in response to the vaginal mesh scandal.

Prof Carl Heneghan at Oxford’s Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, who led the work, said: “Many women have been subjected to great harm because regulatory loopholes allowed mesh devices to be made available in large numbers with no evidence in humans. It is now clear that regulation is not fit for purpose for the riskiest of devices, those that are implanted in the body.

Q&A

What is a vaginal mesh implant?

The implants have been widely used as a simple, less invasive alternative to traditional surgical approaches for treating urinary incontinence and prolapse, conditions that can commonly occur after childbirth. For the majority of women the operation is successful.

However, concerns are mounting over the severe complications suffered by large numbers of patients, including chronic pain, mesh cutting through tissue into the vagina and being left unable to walk or have sex. Johnson & Johnson, whose subsidiary Ethicon produces one of the most widely used mesh products, is fighting a major class action in Australia. The Guardian revealed in August that thousands of women have undergone surgery to have vaginal mesh implants removed during the past decade, suggesting that about one in 15 women fitted with the most common type of mesh support later require surgery to have it extracted due to complications.

“We now know that women who received mesh implants have been part of a global experiment that in many cases has gone badly wrong.

“It is unacceptable for a health professional to make judgments on what they ‘feel is a good thing to do’. What matters is what does high-quality evidence from randomised trials show, and that is over the long-term – five years at least.”

The paper, published in the journal BMJ Open, examined marketing clearance of vaginal mesh devices through the US Food and Drug Administration.

In the US, transvaginal meshes were initially class II devices, allowing them to be marketed on the basis of equivalence to existing devices. The team found 61 devices that were approved on equivalence claims and said there was no clinical-trial evidence for these devices at the time of approval.

However, many of the devices were significantly different from the original device that had gained approval, with different materials, design and method of surgical implantation. Randomised clinical trials were found to be published an average of five years after device approval, the study found.

“Transvaginal mesh products for pelvic organ prolapse have been approved on the basis of weak evidence over the last 20 years,” the authors said.

“When evidence has been forthcoming, it has often emerged too late to inform clinical practice,” they added. “The current systems for ensuring patient safety are inadequate for medical devices.”

Concerns have been growing about the serious complications suffered by some women who have had mesh implants and about the introduction of dozens of different devices, most of which have never been assessed in a clinical trial.

In September, the Guardian reported that a vaginal mesh implant made by Johnson & Johnson had been launched without a clinical trial, and then marketed for five years after the company had learned that it had a higher failure rate than its two earlier devices.

The latest paper calls for clinical trials to be made mandatory in order for any implantable device to be marketed. It also calls for a publicly accessible registry of such devices with details of marketing status and linked evidence to the product.

Such a registry would also include details of which devices are given to which patient so if any “shortcomings” are identified then patients can be tracked down.

Later this month, England’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will publish guidance that is expected to recommend that vaginal mesh should no longer be used for prolapse, outside of a research context.

Stephen Evans, professor of pharmacoepidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said: “The absence of good trials for these vaginal meshes, which has been investigated carefully by these authors, shows the problem clearly. Changes in regulation are often driven by lessons learned from very bad situations, such as thalidomide, and the need for change in regard to devices is clear.”

Cathryn Glazener, emeritus professor at the University of Aberdeen, agreed that tighter regulation was needed to bring device regulation into line with the rigorous scrutiny in place for new drugs.

However, she said a distinction was needed between the use of mesh to treat incontinence, where she said evidence suggested mesh was as effective and safer in the short term than traditional non-mesh operations, and surgery for prolapse, which she said posed greater risks.

Vaginal mesh operations for prolapse should be banned, watchdog to say

Controversial vaginal mesh operations to treat prolapse should be banned as a routine treatment in England, new guidelines to be issued by the health watchdog will recommend.

The draft guidance, seen by the Guardian, states that mesh implants for prolapse should now only be used in the context of research.

The news has been welcomed by those campaigning to raise awareness of the potential complications suffered by some women who have been treated with mesh implants.

Q&A

What is a vaginal mesh implant?

The implants have been widely used as a simple, less invasive alternative to traditional surgical approaches for treating urinary incontinence and prolapse, conditions that can commonly occur after childbirth. For the majority of women the operation is successful.

However, concerns are mounting over the severe complications suffered by large numbers of patients, including chronic pain, mesh cutting through tissue into the vagina and being left unable to walk or have sex. Johnson & Johnson, whose subsidiary Ethicon produces one of the most widely used mesh products, is fighting a major class action in Australia. The Guardian revealed in August that thousands of women have undergone surgery to have vaginal mesh implants removed during the past decade, suggesting that about one in 15 women fitted with the most common type of mesh support later require surgery to have it extracted due to complications.

Some have experienced the implant cutting into the vagina or surrounding organs, while others have been left with chronic pain, and in extreme cases been unable to walk.

The guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) only relates to operations to treat prolapse, where the front or back wall of the vagina has descended into or outside of the vagina, with the mesh used to support the vaginal walls. The draft guidance does not affect the use of mesh implants for incontinence, which accounts for the majority of such operations.

The use of mesh for prolapse has fallen significantly in recent years, with mounting evidence that it is less effective than traditional surgery and has higher rates of women experiencing problems.

Kath Sansom, a campaigner at Sling the Mesh, called for the publication of the full Nice guidelines, which include those relating to the use of mesh for incontinence, to be expedited.

“The full guidelines for all prolapse mesh and incontinence mesh are due out 2019 but that is way too long to wait,” she said. “Nice must bring those guidelines forward to 2018. It is unacceptable to hold off until 2019.”

In the documents, to be published after consultation in December, Nice said there were “serious but well-recognised safety concerns” and that “evidence of long-term efficacy [for implants treating organ prolapse] is inadequate in quality and quantity”.

It added that “when complications occur, these can be serious and have life-changing consequences”, but said “most commentaries received from patients reported satisfaction with the procedure”.

However, a spokesperson for Nice warned that the final guidance had not been officially released, and that the draft was subject to change.

A spokesperson for Nice said: “Our official guidance on the use of vaginal mesh is not due out until 20 December. We will not be issuing a comment until then.” NHS England declined to comment.

The draft guidance is an about-turn for Nice, who in their previous guidelines from 2008 were upbeat about the use of mesh for prolapse.

This year the Guardian reported that more than 800 women are suing the NHS and the manufacturers of vaginal mesh implants after experiencing serious complications.

Owen Smith, the Labour MP for Pontypridd, who has raised concerns about the use of vaginal mesh implants, said: “This is essentially a ban on the use of mesh to treat prolapse, as there is no research context in which it’s likely to be used.

“It’s also another move towards clinicians recognising the scale of the risk associated with mesh and an acknowledgement that mesh has been too widely seen as a quick fix for patients.”

Emma Hardy, the Labour MP for Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle, said she was delighted to hear the draft guidelines proposed that vaginal mesh operations should be banned from treating organ prolapse in England.

“I encourage the NHS to take up this recommendation as the step will prevent the injury of a lot of people in the future,” she said.

But she added that the guidelines did not go far enough. “It does not help those who have already been injured by mesh nor does it do anything to help those suffering because of TVT [tension-free vaginal tape] operations.

“To help them, we need a fully retrospective audit and, if necessary, compensation for those affected.”

Sohier Elneil, a consultant urogynaecologist at University College hospital, who was at one point involved with the Nice committee on the issue, welcomed the news.

“Nice looked at extensive evidence and in particular looked at patient experience as part of the evidence, and came to the conclusions that given it was lacking in good long-term evidence with regards to complications, felt it should be done under research-only conditions,” she said.

“This means patients will not be subjected to a procedure which has not been fully validated.”

Sharon Hodgson MP, the shadow minister for public health, said: “The reports that mesh will be banned for treating organ prolapse in England are a step in the right direction but the government have to be clear about their position on this.

“The updated Nice guidance is not due until the end of December. Ministers should take a lead and step in to take these products off the market while the guidance is being prepared.

“Labour is calling for a pause whilst a full inquiry uncovers the extent of the harm done by mesh implants so we can be sure that this never happens again.

“Mesh implants have left women in permanent pain, unable to walk, and unable to work. This is an ongoing public health scandal and the government need to get all the facts into the public domain and do much more to support those affected.”