Tag Archives: order

Doctors should order more blood cancer tests, MPs say

TV presenter Simon Thomas, whose wife died from a rare form of blood cancer last year, is calling for better training of GPs

Sky sports presenter, Simon Thomas


The Sky Sports presenter Simon Thomas says doctors only diagnosed his wife’s acute myeloid leukaemia three days before she died. Photograph: Nick Potts/PA

The Sky Sports presenter Simon Thomas has revealed that doctors missed his wife’s blood cancer three times in the days before her death.

Thomas called for better training of GPs on the same day as politicians said doctors should order blood tests for any patient who shows symptoms of blood cancer.

Thomas’s wife, Gemma, died aged 40 in November, just three days after being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), a rare form of the disease.

Gemma initially had flu-like symptoms and went to see a doctor three times over the course of six days before she was finally admitted to hospital, where her condition continued to deteriorate, despite intensive chemotherapy treatment.

Since then, her husband Simon has raised more than £30,000 for charity. The money has been divided between Maggie’s Centres, a charity which offers support to people affected by cancer, and a refugee project that Gemma had launched.

On Wednesday, Thomas tweeted: “Three times my wife Gemma went to the doctor in six days and three times she was sent home and told to rest.

“Four days after her final visit to the her GP she was dead. We have to help and train our GPs and to detect blood cancer earlier.”

Simon Thomas (@SimonThomasSky)

Three times my wife Gemma went to the doctor in six days and three times she was sent home and told to rest. Four days after her final visit to her GP she was dead. We have to help and train our GP’s and to detect #bloodcancer earlier. @bloodwise_uk is doing this. #hiddencancer https://t.co/V1uEz1HCLF

January 17, 2018

Simon Thomas (@SimonThomasSky)

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia took my wife Gemma and Ethan’s Mum just before Christmas aged only 40 years and just three days after being diagnosed. This is so important. @bloodwise_uk https://t.co/V1uEz1HCLF

January 17, 2018

Thomas, 44, has been tweeting and blogging about his grief following Gemma’s death from AML, which affects around 2,600 people in Britain each year.

Thomas said he doesn’t blame the doctors who initially saw his wife before she was taken to hospital, but has encouraged people to seek a diagnosis from medics if they continue to feel unwell.

Simon Thomas (@SimonThomasSky)

The darkness will hopefully not overcome. pic.twitter.com/umuBOT0TdW

January 2, 2018

The all-party parliamentary group on blood cancer said on Wednesday that many signs of blood cancer can be “misunderstood or misdiagnosed”.

In a new report, the group said that diagnosing blood cancer – such as leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma – can be “complex”.

Highlighting one patient group, MPs described how some elderly myeloma patients reporting symptoms of back ache and bone pain are told their symptom is “part of the ageing process”.

In order to improve early diagnosis rates, they called on GPs to immediately order a blood test for anyone presenting with one or more symptoms of blood cancer.

Symptoms of blood cancers can be similar to the symptoms of feeling “run down” or flu, such as fatigue, night sweats, weight loss, bruising and pain, they said.

The chair of the patient group, Henry Smith, an MP whose mother died from acute myeloid leukaemia in 2012, said: “Blood cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and someone is diagnosed every 14 minutes.

“Delays in diagnosis can have a severe impact on an individual’s chance of survival, as well as on their quality of life.”

Commenting on the report, professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, chair of the Royal College of GPs, said: ““Each type of blood cancer can present in a varied way and GPs will base their decisions around what diagnostic testing is most appropriate on the symptoms being displayed by, and the unique circumstances potentially affecting, the patient in front of us.

“Any decision to pursue opportunistic testing must not be undertaken lightly as GPs need a good scientific evidence base before they order any investigations.”

NHS must put its house in order before seeking more cash, says internal audit

The NHS needs to put its “house in order” and improve standards before it can justify asking central government for more cash, the man leading a review of efficiency within healthcare has said.

Prof Tim Briggs, the national director of clinical quality and efficiency, said the service wasted too much money on poor care. He told the Times: “I do not think at the moment we deserve more money until we put our house in order and we actually make the changes that will improve the quality of care.

“If you could get the infection rate across the country down to 0.2% just in hip and knee replacements, you’d save the NHS every year £250m-£300m just by improving the quality of care.”

The audit by Briggs identified means of saving hundreds of millions of pounds every year and claimed the greatest wastes of money in hospitals were due to hundreds of thousands of patients needlessly being admitted to emergency surgery beds; bed-blocking; the inflated price of basic surgical equipment; and legal costs associated with mistakes in maternity wards.

Briggs, the consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS trust, said: “There are significant changes we can make to improve our practice that will allow us to do a lot more work with the amount of money we have.”

Two months ago, a report in the Health Service Journal said parts of the NHS in England were considering “savage” cuts in a bid to meet financial targets. Proposals under discussion included: closing or downgrading wards and services; extending waiting times; restricting NHS funding for some treatments; and limiting the number of operations carried out by non-NHS providers.

The NHS has been told to make £22bn in efficiency savings by 2020.

NHS must put its house in order before seeking more cash, says internal audit

The NHS needs to put its “house in order” and improve standards before it can justify asking central government for more cash, the man leading a review of efficiency within healthcare has said.

Prof Tim Briggs, the national director of clinical quality and efficiency, said the service wasted too much money on poor care. He told the Times: “I do not think at the moment we deserve more money until we put our house in order and we actually make the changes that will improve the quality of care.

“If you could get the infection rate across the country down to 0.2% just in hip and knee replacements, you’d save the NHS every year £250m-£300m just by improving the quality of care.”

The audit by Briggs identified means of saving hundreds of millions of pounds every year and claimed the greatest wastes of money in hospitals were due to hundreds of thousands of patients needlessly being admitted to emergency surgery beds; bed-blocking; the inflated price of basic surgical equipment; and legal costs associated with mistakes in maternity wards.

Briggs, the consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS trust, said: “There are significant changes we can make to improve our practice that will allow us to do a lot more work with the amount of money we have.”

Two months ago, a report in the Health Service Journal said parts of the NHS in England were considering “savage” cuts in a bid to meet financial targets. Proposals under discussion included: closing or downgrading wards and services; extending waiting times; restricting NHS funding for some treatments; and limiting the number of operations carried out by non-NHS providers.

The NHS has been told to make £22bn in efficiency savings by 2020.

NHS must put its house in order before seeking more cash, says internal audit

The NHS needs to put its “house in order” and improve standards before it can justify asking central government for more cash, the man leading a review of efficiency within healthcare has said.

Prof Tim Briggs, the national director of clinical quality and efficiency, said the service wasted too much money on poor care. He told the Times: “I do not think at the moment we deserve more money until we put our house in order and we actually make the changes that will improve the quality of care.

“If you could get the infection rate across the country down to 0.2% just in hip and knee replacements, you’d save the NHS every year £250m-£300m just by improving the quality of care.”

The audit by Briggs identified means of saving hundreds of millions of pounds every year and claimed the greatest wastes of money in hospitals were due to hundreds of thousands of patients needlessly being admitted to emergency surgery beds; bed-blocking; the inflated price of basic surgical equipment; and legal costs associated with mistakes in maternity wards.

Briggs, the consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS trust, said: “There are significant changes we can make to improve our practice that will allow us to do a lot more work with the amount of money we have.”

Two months ago, a report in the Health Service Journal said parts of the NHS in England were considering “savage” cuts in a bid to meet financial targets. Proposals under discussion included: closing or downgrading wards and services; extending waiting times; restricting NHS funding for some treatments; and limiting the number of operations carried out by non-NHS providers.

The NHS has been told to make £22bn in efficiency savings by 2020.

NHS must put its house in order before seeking more cash, says internal audit

The NHS needs to put its “house in order” and improve standards before it can justify asking central government for more cash, the man leading a review of efficiency within healthcare has said.

Prof Tim Briggs, the national director of clinical quality and efficiency, said the service wasted too much money on poor care. He told the Times: “I do not think at the moment we deserve more money until we put our house in order and we actually make the changes that will improve the quality of care.

“If you could get the infection rate across the country down to 0.2% just in hip and knee replacements, you’d save the NHS every year £250m-£300m just by improving the quality of care.”

The audit by Briggs identified means of saving hundreds of millions of pounds every year and claimed the greatest wastes of money in hospitals were due to hundreds of thousands of patients needlessly being admitted to emergency surgery beds; bed-blocking; the inflated price of basic surgical equipment; and legal costs associated with mistakes in maternity wards.

Briggs, the consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS trust, said: “There are significant changes we can make to improve our practice that will allow us to do a lot more work with the amount of money we have.”

Two months ago, a report in the Health Service Journal said parts of the NHS in England were considering “savage” cuts in a bid to meet financial targets. Proposals under discussion included: closing or downgrading wards and services; extending waiting times; restricting NHS funding for some treatments; and limiting the number of operations carried out by non-NHS providers.

The NHS has been told to make £22bn in efficiency savings by 2020.

NHS must put its house in order before seeking more cash, says internal audit

The NHS needs to put its “house in order” and improve standards before it can justify asking central government for more cash, the man leading a review of efficiency within healthcare has said.

Prof Tim Briggs, the national director of clinical quality and efficiency, said the service wasted too much money on poor care. He told the Times: “I do not think at the moment we deserve more money until we put our house in order and we actually make the changes that will improve the quality of care.

“If you could get the infection rate across the country down to 0.2% just in hip and knee replacements, you’d save the NHS every year £250m-£300m just by improving the quality of care.”

The audit by Briggs identified means of saving hundreds of millions of pounds every year and claimed the greatest wastes of money in hospitals were due to hundreds of thousands of patients needlessly being admitted to emergency surgery beds; bed-blocking; the inflated price of basic surgical equipment; and legal costs associated with mistakes in maternity wards.

Briggs, the consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS trust, said: “There are significant changes we can make to improve our practice that will allow us to do a lot more work with the amount of money we have.”

Two months ago, a report in the Health Service Journal said parts of the NHS in England were considering “savage” cuts in a bid to meet financial targets. Proposals under discussion included: closing or downgrading wards and services; extending waiting times; restricting NHS funding for some treatments; and limiting the number of operations carried out by non-NHS providers.

The NHS has been told to make £22bn in efficiency savings by 2020.

NHS must put its house in order before seeking more cash, says internal audit

The NHS needs to put its “house in order” and improve standards before it can justify asking central government for more cash, the man leading a review of efficiency within healthcare has said.

Prof Tim Briggs, the national director of clinical quality and efficiency, said the service wasted too much money on poor care. He told the Times: “I do not think at the moment we deserve more money until we put our house in order and we actually make the changes that will improve the quality of care.

“If you could get the infection rate across the country down to 0.2% just in hip and knee replacements, you’d save the NHS every year £250m-£300m just by improving the quality of care.”

The audit by Briggs identified means of saving hundreds of millions of pounds every year and claimed the greatest wastes of money in hospitals were due to hundreds of thousands of patients needlessly being admitted to emergency surgery beds; bed-blocking; the inflated price of basic surgical equipment; and legal costs associated with mistakes in maternity wards.

Briggs, the consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS trust, said: “There are significant changes we can make to improve our practice that will allow us to do a lot more work with the amount of money we have.”

Two months ago, a report in the Health Service Journal said parts of the NHS in England were considering “savage” cuts in a bid to meet financial targets. Proposals under discussion included: closing or downgrading wards and services; extending waiting times; restricting NHS funding for some treatments; and limiting the number of operations carried out by non-NHS providers.

The NHS has been told to make £22bn in efficiency savings by 2020.

Trump signs order giving religious groups greater political freedom

Donald Trump, in a long-anticipated overture to the religious right, signed an executive order on Thursday directing the IRS to weaken its enforcement of a rule barring churches and tax-exempt groups from endorsing political candidates.

With the same stroke of his pen, he took steps to resolve a longtime dispute over an Obama-era rule requiring contraception coverage in employer healthcare plans, in favor of religious employers that oppose birth control.

Trump signed the order as he marked the National Day of Prayer. Throughout the campaign and his presidency, Trump and his inner circle have portrayed religious rights as being under serious assault.

“We will not allow people of faith to be targeted, bullied, or silenced any more and we will never ever stand for religious discrimination,” Trump said to a group of faith leaders gathered in the White House Rose Garden. “With this executive order, we are ending the attacks on your religious liberty.”

But even before Trump’s announcement, many supporters expressed disappointment that the order did not carry stronger language. Evangelical leaders and scholars briefed on the order Wednesday night said it had been watered down from a draft executive order that leaked earlier this year.

That draft established a sweeping set of religious exemptions, using language that would have given millions of Americans “a license to discriminate” against LGBT people and unwed parents, civil rights advocates warned.

The text of the order was not immediately available, but a senior White House official said the order would direct the IRS to use “maximum enforcement discretion” when applying the Johnson amendment, the rule limiting endorsements from the pulpit. It reduces the likelihood that a religious organization would lose its tax-exempt status if one of its leaders were to make a political endorsement.

The order also directs the health department to accommodate religious groups that object to telling the government if they have opted out of the mandate to provide employees with contraceptive coverage, the White House official said.

Reproductive rights groups and campaign finance watchdogs immediately condemned the order. “Americans did not vote to have their healthcare taken away or to have their access to birth control cut off,” said Ilyse Hogue, the president of NARAL Pro-Choice America.

The Center for Reproductive Rights announced it was ready to block the order in court.

“For decades, the charitable political activities prohibition has kept tax-exempt religious institutions focused on their religious missions, freeing them from the pressures associated with partisan political campaigns,” said Trevor Potter, president of the Campaign Legal Center. “The charitable political activities prohibition was adopted and has been supported on a bipartisan basis by administrations of both political parties since the 1950s. Opening the door to a flood of unaccountable political money will undermine the social welfare purpose of religious institutions.”

Contrary to reports from earlier this week, the order seems to have stopped short of asserting that individuals and organizations have a right to refuse services based on religious beliefs.

Trump’s administration was twice rumored to be preparing a sweeping executive order that would have given any government worker or organization receiving federal funding – such as a hospital, nursing home, school, or university – a right of refusal, which was widely seen as targeting LGBT people.

But reports that Trump would sign such an order – the first rumblings were in February – do not appear to have been borne out.

Mark Silk, a professor at Trinity College in Connecticut who writes on religious freedom, called the new order “very weak tea,” especially compared to the draft that leaked earlier this year. “It’s gestural, as far as I can tell,” Silk said.

Others gave the order glowing praise.

Ralph Reed, a longtime evangelical leader and founder of the Faith & Freedom Coalition, called the provisions on which he was briefed an “excellent first step. This administratively removes the threat of harassment.”

Trump promised to “totally destroy” the Johnson amendment in February. Fully abolishing the regulation would take an act of Congress, but Trump is essentially directing the IRS not to enforce the prohibitions.

The order will also deal a regulatory blow to Obamacare just as Republicans are poised to roll back key elements of Obama’s signature achievement in Congress.

Under the Affordable Care Act, the Obama administration required employee healthcare plans to offer coverage for a range of contraceptive devices and services.

However, it offered an exemption for groups with a religious mission that opposed contraception on moral grounds. To claim the exemption, an organization simply had to notify the health department that it would not cover contraception.

Many religious groups objected to even notifying the government that they didn’t intend to cover contraceptives. Because the government would make alternate arrangements to cover their employees, those groups argued, it was tantamount to the employers providing the coverage themselves.

In spring 2016, the supreme court heard a challenge to the exemption process from a group of nuns known as the Little Sisters of the Poor. The court declined to rule on the principles at the heart of the case and instead directed the government and the Little Sisters to reach a compromise.

NHS chiefs order hospitals to begin urgent overhaul of A&E care

NHS chiefs have ordered hospitals to push through an urgent overhaul of A&E care, with GPs assessing every patient when they turn up to help the health service avoid another winter crisis.

The move comes as the NHS in England disclosed that it recorded its worst performance to date in January, missing vital treatment targets covering A&E, cancer and planned hospital care. The number of patients stuck in hospitals due to inadequate social care, such as a shortage of care home places, also hit an all-time high.

In a speech on Thursday, Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, added to the pressure on hospitals by telling them to get back to meeting the target of treating 95% of A&E patients within four hours. That fell to 77.6% in January as hospitals buckled under unprecedented demand for emergency care.

However, hospital chiefs immediately criticised Hunt’s edict as “unrealistic” and demanded much more money to improve A&E care than the £100m in Wednesday’s budget.

NHS groups have voiced serious doubts as to whether there are enough GPs in England to work at every A&E unit. Dr Helen Stokes-Lampard, the chair of the Royal College of GPs, said: “We feel that the best place for GPs is working with patients in their communities and the money just announced for new triage systems in emergency departments would achieve more if most was spent shoring up general practice.”

The NHS England chief executive, Simon Stevens, and his counterpart at NHS Improvement, Jim Mackey, have written to all parts of the health service outlining “concrete changes” they must make to prevent next winter from overwhelming hospitals.

Over the previous winter, pictures of patients lying on trolleys in hospital corridors and countless stories about waiting many hours for ambulances caused major embarrassment to ministers and NHS chiefs.

Under the changes set out on Thursday:

  • Ambulance crews will treat many more sick people where they find them, rather than bringing patients to hospital. In future, paramedics should be “conveying patients to hospital only when this is clinically necessary”, the letter says.
  • Every hospital will have put in place “comprehensive front door streaming” by October, under which family doctors and nurses will assess how unwell patients are to reduce the risk of A&E units becoming overloaded by the 1.5 million to 3 million people who turn up unnecessarily every year.
  • GP surgeries will have to offer many more appointments at weekends and in evenings, ultimately providing these to everyone in England by 2020.
  • Doctors and nurses will have to provide better medical care to the 400,000 older people living in care homes, to stop them becoming so unwell that they need to be admitted to hospital.
  • NHS bodies will work much more closely with local councils to reduce so-called bedblocking in hospitals. Councils will use the £1bn extra for social care in 2017-18 announced in Wednesday’s budget to provide more at-home care services and places in care homes.
  • The NHS 111 telephone advice service will be overhauled to enable many more callers to speak to a doctor, nurse, mental health specialist or other type of health professional, as the Guardian reported on Wednesday.

Stevens and Mackey made it clear in their letter, published on Thursday, that NHS hospital trusts that do not implement every element of the plan will in effect be fined, by being denied money from the service’s £1.8bn-a-year sustainability and transformation hospital bailout fund.

Prof John Appleby, the chief economist at the Nuffield Trust health thinktank, said the latest performance figures “make dismal reading for the NHS and patients”.

“The number of patients stuck on a trolley waiting for a hospital bed has gone through the roof, with more than 80,000 patients waiting for four hours or more in January, and a staggering 988 of them waiting longer than 12 hours,” he said. “These are vulnerable people with acute medical needs. Corridors, it seems, have become the new emergency wards.”

Cancer charities criticised ministers over the NHS again missing the target for treating cancer patients referred for urgent treatment within 62 days.

Emma Greenwood, the director of policy at Cancer Research UK, said: “Today’s figures for January are the worst ever performance against this crucial cancer target, which has now been missed annually for three years. This is completely unacceptable.

“Cancer targets exist to ensure quick diagnosis and access to treatment, and provide a snapshot of how the NHS is performing for patients. The government and NHS England have committed to improving early diagnosis of cancer, including increasing investment, but it’s clear that this is yet to have an impact.

“Specifically, we have yet to see any significant progress to address huge staff shortages in the diagnostic workforce, especially for radiologists, pathologists, endoscopists and radiographers.”

Most Still Don’t Know ObamaCare Penalties Waived by Trump Executive Order

The I.R.S has been instructed by the Trump Administration via Executive Order  not to collect ObamaCare Penalties. Giving millions of Americans and small businesses a huge break and boosting the economy. Ordering the I.R.S. not or ask about your healthcare situation makes sure no further penalties can be assessed. Effectively throwing a monkey wrench into the ObamaCare tax and penalty system that has wrecked the American economy. As Congress sits on their hands and does nothing this one act alone has given millions of families much needed help. Millennials who don’t get ObamaCare will actually get a tax return this year. Small business can expand not having to worry about the mandates. Majorly boosting the consumer confidence and adding to the stock market rally. Trump can do this because the President has the responsibility to direct all employees of the federal government. Congress may wait and try to introduce ObamaCare Lite but Trump has beat them to the punch back on January 20th.

Why is this not more widely reported on mainstream fake news? Nothing on nightly news. A couple begrudging mentions in the national papers. Local or city newspapers and television? Forget about it. Alternative sources and conservative economic media have reported on it. The answer is obvious. It is not politically convenient.

This is such cause for celebration for all Americans yet almost nothing is being done by the 5th column to advertise the fact to the people. This is important. A lot senior citizens who rely on these “news sources” are not even aware of this. Lower income people and even low information consumers are still making financial and healthcare decisions based on old information.

Executive Order Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal

Section 2 of the Executive Order of Jan 20th reads.

Sec. 2.  To the maximum extent permitted by law, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (Secretary) and the heads of all other executive departments and agencies (agencies) with authorities and responsibilities under the Act shall exercise all authority and discretion available to them to waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation of any provision or requirement of the Act that would impose a fiscal burden on any State or a cost, fee, tax, penalty, or regulatory burden on individuals, families, healthcare providers, health insurers, patients, recipients of healthcare services, purchasers of health insurance, or makers of medical devices, products, or medications.

Small businesses over 50 people that don’t comply with the Obamacare can pay as much as $ 5000 per employee as places like Macdonalds get waivers. The penalty to an individual can be as high as $ 2800 in the higher tax brackets. Even at the lower end even $ 600 can be be a low income earner’s entire tax return. The effect goes far beyond that.

Now families and individuals can effectively ignore the disastrous law all together. No longer saddled with having to get useless health insurance with high premiums. Saving many hundreds of dollars a month for an average family. Choosing alternative means of healthcare not prescribed under the draconian ObamaCare. If they know about it.

Sources:

RaptormanReports

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/2/executive-order-minimizing-economic-burden-patient-protection-and

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kellyphillipserb/2017/01/20/trump-signs-executive-order-to-roll-back-obamacare/#7858a7643eeb