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Five dead in E coli outbreak linked to Arizona romaine lettuce

A total of five people have died and 197 have been stricken with illness following a deadly E coli outbreak that has reached 35 states in the US, health officials have reported.

The nation’s largest multi-state E coli outbreak in more than a decade has been blamed upon contaminated Romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region of Arizona. The harvesting season for the lettuce ended in April so it’s unlikely that the tainted product is still being used in homes and restaurants.

Of the people who have fallen ill, 89 required hospitalization, according to a Center for Disease Control (CDC) report. The first E coli-related death, reported in early May in California, has now been followed by four more confirmed deaths across Arkansas, Minnesota and New York, the CDC said. Officials in Canada have also reported the presence of the same strain of E Coli in the country.

“Some people who became sick did not report eating romaine lettuce, but had close contact with someone else who got sick from eating romaine lettuce,” the CDC stated, adding that some illnesses may not be apparent due to the typical two to three week lag between the onset of sickness and reporting to authorities.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is investigating the outbreak with the CDC, said it is “examining all possibilities, including that contamination may have occurred at any point along the growing, harvesting, packaging, and distribution chain before reaching consumers”.

People who consume harmful E coli bacteria can experience symptoms such as diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, fatigue, nausea and vomiting within three to four days. Most people recover from this within a week but in some cases it can develop into more serious conditions such as kidney failure, which can be fatal.

Children aged under five-years-old, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk from E coli, although even healthy young adults can become “seriously ill,” the CDC said.

The FDA recommends that people wash hands, utensils and surfaces with hot water before handling food, as well as keep their refrigerators clean. Those who experience symptoms similar to those infected by the E coli bacteria are urged to immediately seek medical treatment.

Five dead in E coli outbreak linked to Arizona romaine lettuce

A total of five people have died and 197 have been stricken with illness following a deadly E coli outbreak that has reached 35 states in the US, health officials have reported.

The nation’s largest multi-state E coli outbreak in more than a decade has been blamed upon contaminated Romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region of Arizona. The harvesting season for the lettuce ended in April so it’s unlikely that the tainted product is still being used in homes and restaurants.

Of the people who have fallen ill, 89 required hospitalization, according to a Center for Disease Control (CDC) report. The first E coli-related death, reported in early May in California, has now been followed by four more confirmed deaths across Arkansas, Minnesota and New York, the CDC said. Officials in Canada have also reported the presence of the same strain of E Coli in the country.

“Some people who became sick did not report eating romaine lettuce, but had close contact with someone else who got sick from eating romaine lettuce,” the CDC stated, adding that some illnesses may not be apparent due to the typical two to three week lag between the onset of sickness and reporting to authorities.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is investigating the outbreak with the CDC, said it is “examining all possibilities, including that contamination may have occurred at any point along the growing, harvesting, packaging, and distribution chain before reaching consumers”.

People who consume harmful E coli bacteria can experience symptoms such as diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, fatigue, nausea and vomiting within three to four days. Most people recover from this within a week but in some cases it can develop into more serious conditions such as kidney failure, which can be fatal.

Children aged under five-years-old, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk from E coli, although even healthy young adults can become “seriously ill,” the CDC said.

The FDA recommends that people wash hands, utensils and surfaces with hot water before handling food, as well as keep their refrigerators clean. Those who experience symptoms similar to those infected by the E coli bacteria are urged to immediately seek medical treatment.

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”

American shoppers told to avoid romaine lettuce amid E coli outbreak

The US government has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, warning that an E coli outbreak has sickened dozens in several states.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded a health warning about contaminated lettuce, saying people should avoid whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce that may have come from the Yuma region in Arizona. The prior warnings had only applied to chopped romaine by itself or as part of salads and salad mixes.

Officials said people at an Alaska correctional facility recently reported feeling ill after eating romaine lettuce that was traced back to lettuce heads harvested in Yuma, which is roughly 185 miles southwest of Phoenix.

The E coli outbreak has infected a total of 53 people in 16 states, officials said. At least 31 have been hospitalized, including five with kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

CDC (@CDCgov)

E. coli Outbreak Update: Based on new data, CDC advises throwing away whole heads of romaine and hearts of romaine, plus chopped romaine and salad mixes, from Yuma, Arizona growing region. https://t.co/WTdyf3IWsY pic.twitter.com/F1RHsL3rt4

April 20, 2018

The CDC advised restaurants and retailers not to serve or sell any romaine lettuce from Yuma and encouraged them to ask suppliers about the source of the leafy green.

Product labels often do not identify growing regions, and the CDC advised consumers to throw out any romaine lettuce if they are uncertain of the source.

A 66-year-old woman recently filed a lawsuit against the chain Panera Bread alleging that she was sickened by E coli after eating at one of the restaurants in New Jersey. The woman said she experienced abdominal pain within days of eating the lettuce and that she was eventually sent to the emergency room, diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening illness, the Washington Post reported.

The CDC reported 12 cases in Pennsylvania and 10 cases in Idaho.

Bill Marler, an attorney for the woman who filed a lawsuit, told the Post this week that he expected the number of reported illnesses to increase: “This stuff went everywhere. It’s conceivable that we may be seeing the beginnings of a fairly significant outbreak. They’ve linked it to Yuma, because that’s where romaine this time of year is grown.”