Tag Archives: raised

Dementia risk to 50-year-olds with raised blood pressure – study

Fifty-year-olds with slightly raised blood pressure are at an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, a new study has suggested.

Study participants had a greater risk even if they did not have other heart-related problems, the research published in the European Heart Journal said.

The association between blood pressure and dementia risk was seen at aged 50, but not 60 or 70, the study found.

People aged 50 with a systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg, which is between the ideal blood pressure range (90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg) and that considered to be high (140/90mmHg), or above had a 45% greater risk of developing dementia, scientists said.

Those taking part in the study developed dementia at an average age of 75.

Dr Jessica Abell, paper author and a research associate in dementia and epidemiology at University College London, said the study looks in more detail at what is considered “midlife”.

She said: “Previous research has not been able to test the link between raised blood pressure and dementia directly by examining the timing in sufficient detail.

“In our paper we were able to examine the association at age 50, 60 and 70, and we found different patterns of association. This will have important implications for policy guidelines, which currently only use the generic term ‘midlife’.”

Prof Archana Singh-Manoux, honorary professor at UCL, led the research and said: “Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia, as suggested by previous research. It also suggests that at age 50, the risk of dementia may be increased in people who have raised levels of systolic blood pressure below the threshold commonly used to treat hypertension.”

Researchers suggested a possible reason for the link could be resulting damage from silent or mini-strokes, which often have unnoticed symptoms and are linked to high blood pressure.

Dr Abell noted that the findings were from “observational, population-level research” and therefore “do not translate directly into implications for individual patients”.

The research analysed 8,639 people, part of the long-running Whitehall II study of more than 10,000 civil servants tracked since 1985.

Dementia risk to 50-year-olds with raised blood pressure – study

Fifty-year-olds with slightly raised blood pressure are at an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, a new study has suggested.

Study participants had a greater risk even if they did not have other heart-related problems, the research published in the European Heart Journal said.

The association between blood pressure and dementia risk was seen at aged 50, but not 60 or 70, the study found.

People aged 50 with a systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg, which is between the ideal blood pressure range (90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg) and that considered to be high (140/90mmHg), or above had a 45% greater risk of developing dementia, scientists said.

Those taking part in the study developed dementia at an average age of 75.

Dr Jessica Abell, paper author and a research associate in dementia and epidemiology at University College London, said the study looks in more detail at what is considered “midlife”.

She said: “Previous research has not been able to test the link between raised blood pressure and dementia directly by examining the timing in sufficient detail.

“In our paper we were able to examine the association at age 50, 60 and 70, and we found different patterns of association. This will have important implications for policy guidelines, which currently only use the generic term ‘midlife’.”

Prof Archana Singh-Manoux, honorary professor at UCL, led the research and said: “Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia, as suggested by previous research. It also suggests that at age 50, the risk of dementia may be increased in people who have raised levels of systolic blood pressure below the threshold commonly used to treat hypertension.”

Researchers suggested a possible reason for the link could be resulting damage from silent or mini-strokes, which often have unnoticed symptoms and are linked to high blood pressure.

Dr Abell noted that the findings were from “observational, population-level research” and therefore “do not translate directly into implications for individual patients”.

The research analysed 8,639 people, part of the long-running Whitehall II study of more than 10,000 civil servants tracked since 1985.

Dementia risk to 50-year-olds with raised blood pressure – study

Fifty-year-olds with slightly raised blood pressure are at an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, a new study has suggested.

Study participants had a greater risk even if they did not have other heart-related problems, the research published in the European Heart Journal said.

The association between blood pressure and dementia risk was seen at aged 50, but not 60 or 70, the study found.

People aged 50 with a systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg, which is between the ideal blood pressure range (90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg) and that considered to be high (140/90mmHg), or above had a 45% greater risk of developing dementia, scientists said.

Those taking part in the study developed dementia at an average age of 75.

Dr Jessica Abell, paper author and a research associate in dementia and epidemiology at University College London, said they study looks in more detail at what is considered “midlife”.

She said: “Previous research has not been able to test the link between raised blood pressure and dementia directly by examining the timing in sufficient detail.

“In our paper we were able to examine the association at age 50, 60 and 70, and we found different patterns of association. This will have important implications for policy guidelines, which currently only use the generic term ‘midlife’.”

Prof Archana Singh-Manoux, honorary professor at UCL, led the research and said: “Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia, as suggested by previous research. It also suggests that at age 50, the risk of dementia may be increased in people who have raised levels of systolic blood pressure below the threshold commonly used to treat hypertension.”

Researchers suggested a possible reason for the link could be resulting damage from silent or mini-strokes, which often have unnoticed symptoms and are linked to high blood pressure.

Dr Abell noted that the findings were from “observational, population-level research” and therefore “do not translate directly into implications for individual patients”.

The research analysed 8,639 people, part of the long-running Whitehall II study of more than 10,000 civil servants tracked since 1985.

May appoints minister to tackle loneliness issues raised by Jo Cox

Tracey Crouch tasked with implementing recommendations from commission set up after the MP’s death

An elderly woman sits alone in a bedroom


Theresa May cited research saying that 9 million people often or always feel lonely. Photograph: Education Images/UIG/Getty Images/Universal Images Group

Theresa May has appointed one of her ministers to lead on issues connected to loneliness, implementing one of the main recommendations of a report into the subject by the Jo Cox Commission.

Tracey Crouch, the minister for sport and civil society, will head a government-wide group with responsibility for policies connected to loneliness, Downing Street said.

In parallel, the government said it would develop a wider strategy on the issue, gather more evidence and statistics, and provide funding for community groups to start activities which connect people.

The move follows a cross-party report by the commission set up in honour of Cox, the Labour MP murdered by a rightwing extremist in 2016, who had campaigned about loneliness.

May is expected to formally announce the appointment on Wednesday, and to say that she has accepted many of the recommendations from the commission. She will also host a Downing Street reception in honour of Cox’s work.

Citing research saying that 9 million people often or always feel lonely, the prime minister said: “For far too many people, loneliness is the sad reality of modern life.

“I want to confront this challenge for our society and for all of us to take action to address the loneliness endured by the elderly, by carers, by those who have lost loved ones – people who have no one to talk to or share their thoughts and experiences with.”

May paid tribute to Cox’s work, saying she hoped the initiative would aim “to see that, in Jo’s memory, we bring an end to the acceptance of loneliness for good”.

The Jo Cox Commission, which is chaired by the Labour MP Rachel Reeves and Seema Kennedy, a Conservative, has been working for the past year with more than a dozen charities on ideas to approach the problem.

In a joint statement, Reeves and Kennedy said they welcomed the government response, and would work with Crouch and various groups to tackle the issue.

They said: “Jo Cox said that ‘young or old, loneliness doesn’t discriminate’. Throughout 2017 we have heard from new parents, children, disabled people, carers, refugees and older people about their experience of loneliness.”

Crouch said she felt privileged to be taking forward the work begun by Cox: “I am sure that with the support of volunteers, campaigners, businesses and my fellow MPs from all sides of the house, we can make significant progress in defeating loneliness.”

May appoints minister to tackle loneliness issues raised by Jo Cox

Tracey Crouch tasked with implementing recommendations from commission set up after the MP’s death

An elderly woman sits alone in a bedroom


Theresa May cited research saying that 9 million people often or always feel lonely. Photograph: Education Images/UIG/Getty Images/Universal Images Group

Theresa May has appointed one of her ministers to lead on issues connected to loneliness, implementing one of the main recommendations of a report into the subject by the Jo Cox Commission.

Tracey Crouch, the minister for sport and civil society, will head a government-wide group with responsibility for policies connected to loneliness, Downing Street said.

In parallel, the government said it would develop a wider strategy on the issue, gather more evidence and statistics, and provide funding for community groups to start activities which connect people.

The move follows a cross-party report by the commission set up in honour of Cox, the Labour MP murdered by a rightwing extremist in 2016, who had campaigned about loneliness.

May is expected to formally announce the appointment on Wednesday, and to say that she has accepted many of the recommendations from the commission. She will also host a Downing Street reception in honour of Cox’s work.

Citing research saying that 9 million people often or always feel lonely, the prime minister said: “For far too many people, loneliness is the sad reality of modern life.

“I want to confront this challenge for our society and for all of us to take action to address the loneliness endured by the elderly, by carers, by those who have lost loved ones – people who have no one to talk to or share their thoughts and experiences with.”

May paid tribute to Cox’s work, saying she hoped the initiative would aim “to see that, in Jo’s memory, we bring an end to the acceptance of loneliness for good”.

The Jo Cox Commission, which is chaired by the Labour MP Rachel Reeves and Seema Kennedy, a Conservative, has been working for the past year with more than a dozen charities on ideas to approach the problem.

In a joint statement, Reeves and Kennedy said they welcomed the government response, and would work with Crouch and various groups to tackle the issue.

They said: “Jo Cox said that ‘young or old, loneliness doesn’t discriminate’. Throughout 2017 we have heard from new parents, children, disabled people, carers, refugees and older people about their experience of loneliness.”

Crouch said she felt privileged to be taking forward the work begun by Cox: “I am sure that with the support of volunteers, campaigners, businesses and my fellow MPs from all sides of the house, we can make significant progress in defeating loneliness.”

Children raised by same-sex parents do as well as their peers, study shows

As the marriage equality vote draws toward its close, a comprehensive study published in the Medical Journal of Australia shows children raised in same-sex-parented families do as well as children raised by heterosexual couple parents.

The review of three decades of peer-reviewed research by Melbourne Children’s found children raised in same-sex-parented families did as well emotionally, socially and educationally as their peers.

The study’s findings will undercut one of the arguments that have been used by the No campaign: that children need both a mother and a father to flourish.

The study’s authors said their work aimed to put an end to the misinformation about children of same-sex couples and pointed out that the results had been replicated across independent studies in Australia and internationally.

Titled The Kids are OK: it is Discrimination Not Same-Sex Parents that Harms Children, the report comes as the postal survey voting period enters its final days. Votes must be received by the Australian Bureau of Statistics by November 7 and outcome will be announced on November 15. So far polling has indicated that the Yes campaign is headed for a convincing win.

Among the studies reviewed were the 2017 public policy research portal at Columbia Law School, which reviewed 79 studies investigating the wellbeing of children raised by gay or lesbian parents; a 2014 American Sociological Association review of more than 40 studies, which concluded that children raised by same-sex couples fared as well as other children across a number of wellbeing measures; and the Australian Institute of Family Studies’ 2013 review of the Australian and international research, which showed there was no evidence of harm.

“The findings of these reviews reflect a broader consensus within the fields of family studies and psychology. It is family processes – parenting quality, parental wellbeing, the quality of and satisfaction with relationships within the family) – rather than family structures that make a more meaningful difference to children’s wellbeing and positive development,” the researchers said.

The researchers said that studies reporting poor outcomes had been widely criticised for their methodological limitations. For example the widely quoted Regnerus study compared adults raised by a gay or lesbian parent in any family configuration with adults who were raised in stable, heterosexual, two-parent family environments, which may have distorted the outcomes.

However, the study did find that young people who expressed diversity in their sexual orientation or gender identity experienced some of the highest rates of psychological distress in Australia, said the study’s senior author, Prof Frank Oberklaid.

“Young LGBTIQ+ people are much more likely to experience poor mental health, self-harm and suicide than other young people, “ he said.

“Sadly, this is largely attributed to the harassment, stigma and discrimination they and other LGBTIQ+ individuals and communities face in our society,” Oberklaid said.

Children from Rainbow Families discuss marriage equality plebiscite

He warned that the debate itself had been harmful.

“The negative and discriminatory rhetoric of the current marriage equality debate is damaging the most vulnerable members of our community – children and adolescents. It’s essential that we recognise the potential for the debate about marriage equality to cause harm for our children and young people,” Oberklaid said.

He said there was solid evidence in countries that had legalised same-sex marriage that it had a positive impact on the mental health and wellbeing of same-sex-parented families and LGBTIQ+ young people.

“As part of the medical community we feel a duty of care to all groups in our society, particularly to those who are vulnerable. Our duty extends to making sure that accurate, objective interpretations of the best available evidence are available and inaccuracies are corrected in an effort to reduce the destructiveness of public debate,” Oberklaid said.

He called for an end to the negative messages that could harm children in the final weeks of the voting period.

Melbourne Children’s is made of up of four child health organisations – the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, the Royal Children’s hospital, the University of Melbourne, department of paediatrics and the Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation.

E-cigarettes containing nicotine linked to raised heart attack risk

E-cigarettes containing nicotine could increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, researchers have found.

A study discovered that vaping devices containing the stimulant could cause a stiffening of the arteries, as well as an increased heart rate and blood pressure.

Swedish scientists recruited 15 healthy volunteers to take part in the experiment, none of whom had used e-cigarettes before.

The tests found in the 30 minutes after smoking the e-cigarettes containing nicotine, there was a significant increase in blood pressure, heart rate and arterial stiffness.

There was no such effect in the volunteers who smoked the e-cigarettes without nicotine.

Dr Magnus Lundback of the Karolinska Institute, a medical university in Stockholm, said: “The number of e-cigarette users has increased dramatically in the last few years. E-cigarettes are regarded by the general public as almost harmless.

“The industry markets their product as a way to reduce harm and to help people to stop smoking tobacco cigarettes. However, the safety of e-cigarettes is debated, and a growing body of evidence is suggesting several adverse health effects.

“The results are preliminary, but in this study we found there was a significant increase in heart rate and blood pressure in the volunteers who were exposed to e-cigarettes containing nicotine. Arterial stiffness increased around three-fold in those who were exposed to nicotine-containing e-cigarettes compared with the nicotine-free group.”

While the effects seen in the tests were temporary, Lundback said that chronic exposure to e-cigarettes with nicotine could have permanent effects.

E-cigarettes containing nicotine linked to raised heart attack risk

E-cigarettes containing nicotine could increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, researchers have found.

A study discovered that vaping devices containing the stimulant could cause a stiffening of the arteries, as well as an increased heart rate and blood pressure.

Swedish scientists recruited 15 healthy volunteers to take part in the experiment, none of whom had used e-cigarettes before.

The tests found in the 30 minutes after smoking the e-cigarettes containing nicotine, there was a significant increase in blood pressure, heart rate and arterial stiffness.

There was no such effect in the volunteers who smoked the e-cigarettes without nicotine.

Dr Magnus Lundback of the Karolinska Institute, a medical university in Stockholm, said: “The number of e-cigarette users has increased dramatically in the last few years. E-cigarettes are regarded by the general public as almost harmless.

“The industry markets their product as a way to reduce harm and to help people to stop smoking tobacco cigarettes. However, the safety of e-cigarettes is debated, and a growing body of evidence is suggesting several adverse health effects.

“The results are preliminary, but in this study we found there was a significant increase in heart rate and blood pressure in the volunteers who were exposed to e-cigarettes containing nicotine. Arterial stiffness increased around three-fold in those who were exposed to nicotine-containing e-cigarettes compared with the nicotine-free group.”

While the effects seen in the tests were temporary, Lundback said that chronic exposure to e-cigarettes with nicotine could have permanent effects.

£115,000 raised for children of couple who died of cancer

The children of a terminally ill couple who died of cancer within days of each other have said they are “overwhelmed” after more than £100,000 was raised for them.

The money flooded in after the children of Julie and Mike Bennet, from Wirral, released a photograph of their parents holding hands on their deathbeds.

The picture was taken hours before Mike Bennet died last Monday from a brain tumour. His wife, Julie, died on Saturday night at the same Merseyside hospice.

More than £115,000 had been raised on Monday morning for the couple’s three children – Oliver, 13, Hannah, 18, and Luke, 21 – by 5,370 members of the public on a JustGiving page set up to help them “continue to live at home and sustain their activities and studies”.

Donations flooded in after the children of Julie and Mike Bennet released a photograph of their parents holding hands on their deathbeds.


Donations flooded in after the children of Julie and Mike Bennet released a photograph of their parents holding hands on their deathbeds. Photograph: Family handout

In a statement, Luke Bennet said: “My brother, sister and I are overwhelmed by the enormous support and generosity we have received from so many friends and well-wishers.

“Mum has appreciated all the help from close friends in supporting the family over the last three years through difficult times and it would be a huge relief to her to know this support will continue.”

Mike Bennet was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2013 and had been nursed at home by Julie and the children.

The 57-year-old was a self-employed cabinetmaker who had served his apprenticeship with Baldock’s Furniture Manufacturers in Liverpool.

Julie, 50, who was a primary schoolteacher at Somerville school in Wallasey, was diagnosed with liver and kidney cancer in May 2016.

Family friend Heather Heaton Gallagher described the couple as “the most supportive parents”. She said: “Facing a double terminal cancer diagnosis is beyond belief and as a community we are working hard to support the family so that they can stay together and ensure that they can continue their education as planned.

“The biggest challenge is that the family car, a Motorbility car has to be returned, meaning that the kids can’t get around to manage practical and personal activities.

“Julie and Mike have been the most supportive parents, encouraging their children’s interest in dance and acting from a very early age.

“All three children thrive on the stage and I know that Julie and Mike would not want this to stop their children from dancing and performing. To help them do this, we need to make them mobile again and help cover the costs that this brings.”

The fundraising page, set up only six days ago, raised more than £15,000 in the first 24 hours. A family friend, Sue Wright, said of Julie: “I told her the community would come together to help look after her kids – and she opened her eyes and smiled.”

Overall health risks of contraceptive pill raised at inquest into DVT death of Petra Zele

A West Australian coroner has raised considerations about the chance posed by some oral contraceptives in an inquest into the death of a 28-12 months-old lady who collapsed with a blood clot at Fremantle hospital in 2010.

The coroner Sarah Linton discovered it was likely the pill, combined with an obvious genetic predisposition to deep vein thrombosis (DVT), put Petra Zele at increased chance of having the pulmonary embolism that killed her.

Zele died on 1 June 2010, four days right after collapsing in the hospital’s emergency department. She had been taking the contraceptive pill Yasmin given that the prior November.

The doctor who attended Zele when she 1st went to the emergency department of Fremantle hospital, on 9 May, did not know she was taking the pill.

In findings handed down this month, Linton said the box on Zele’s triage type listing any medications she was taking was marked “nil”, and neither the nurses who attended Zele nor the emergency department medical doctor exclusively asked her if she was on the contraceptive pill.

“Simply taking the oral contraceptive pill elevated the deceased’s chance of building venous thrombosis,” Linton explained.

Studies linking oral contraceptive pills containing drospirenone to a higher chance of DVT prompted the Therapeutic Products Administration to situation an advisory on 6 July 2011.

The only contraceptive pills containing drospirenone offered in Australia are Yasmin and Yaz.

The inquest heard that women taking Yasmin have been six.3 times a lot more likely to create a pulmonary embolism than girls not on any kind of medicine. Contraceptives using a distinct type of progesterone improved the threat of DVT by three.6 instances.

“For the ordinary youthful girl with no chance aspects other than becoming prescribed the oral contraceptive pill, that risk is usually deemed to be quite reduced,” Linton explained.

But for females like Zele, who took the contraceptive pill and had a genetic predisposition to DVT, the threat was 30 instances better.

Linton said the emergency department also appeared to have either misplaced or failed to appropriately label the transfer of an echocardiogram taken of Zele on 9 Might.

Alternatively Zele was diagnosed with muscle discomfort and offered some ibuprofen.

The notes of Dr Susan Hinsley, the emergency department doctor who noticed Zele on that day, said “No PE risks”. Hinsley advised the inquest that meant no pulmonary embolism hazards.

Hinsley has since been taken prior to the Australian Overall health Practitioner Regulation Company and found to have provided an “unsatisfactory specialist performance” in this situation, but no disciplinary action was taken.

On 27 May possibly Zele went to her GP complaining of chest pains and shortness of breath. The subsequent day her father drove her to Fremantle hospital soon after she suffered from chest pains so extreme she struggled to breathe. She collapsed on the way to hospital and was revived soon after 58 minutes of CPR, just before becoming transferred to the intensive care unit.

On 31 Could medical doctors declared her brain dead and the up coming day her ventilator was switched off, at her family’s request.

Linton said that had the proper diagnosis been manufactured when Zele 1st went to the hospital, she would not have collapsed 3 weeks later.

She advised all GPs must advise sufferers every time they filled a new script for the contraceptive pill that they ought to declare it when asked if they were taking any medicine or asked to supply a healthcare historical past.