Tag Archives: report

Half of TV ads seen by children are for junk food and drink – report

Half of advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

Research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found that 50% of all TV advertisements seen by children aged between four and 15 are for products high in fat, salt or sugar.

The revelation comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity.

The advertising of such foods during children’s programmes has been banned since 2007. But research by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom has shown that children spend 64% of their TV viewing time watching shows not aimed specifically at them.

Health, medical and children’s organisations want ministers to introduce a tougher regime as part of the second phase of their childhood obesity strategy, due later this year.

An IFS briefing paper on children’s exposure to food and drink advertising on the small screen says: “50% of the TV advertising for food and drinks that children saw in 2015 was for products that are HFSS [high in fat, salt or sugar] or for restaurants and bars. [Of that] 39% was for products that were HFSS [and] 11% was for restaurants and bars, the majority of which was for fast food chains. (Over half of this was for McDonald’s).”

Significantly, 70% of the ads children see for HFSS products go out before the 9pm TV viewing watershed. Health campaigners are urging the government to ban all HFSS advertising before that time, because of the large numbers of under-18s who watch programmes in the early evening.

“In 2015, up to 35% of the TV adverts for food and drink that children saw would have been directly affected had restrictions applied before the watershed,” said Rebekah Stroud, a research economist at the IFS and co-author of the briefing.

Ads for HFSS products shown in breaks during family entertainment shows such as ITV’s The X Factor have attracted particular concern because children make up a large proportion of their audience.

“This report demonstrates in stark fashion the critical urgency of tackling our nationwide childhood obesity crisis,” said Sharon Hodgson MP, Labour’s public health minister.

“The prime minister must deliver substantial action in this year’s revised childhood obesity strategy, and stop her government’s reckless cuts to local authority and education budgets.”

The findings come days after NHS figures showed that 22,646 children aged 10 and 11 in England in school year six – one in 25 of that year group – are severely obese. That means they have been found to have a body mass index of at least 40.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said ministers were preparing further action on childhood obesity. “Our sugar tax is funding school sports programmes and nutritious breakfasts for the poorest children, and we’re investing in further research into the links between obesity and inequality.

“We’ve always said that our 2016 plan was the start of the conversation, not the final word on obesity. We are in the process of working up an updated plan, and will be in a position to say more shortly.”

Half of TV ads seen by children are for junk food and drink – report

Half of advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

Research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found that 50% of all TV advertisements seen by children aged between four and 15 are for products high in fat, salt or sugar.

The revelation comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity.

The advertising of such foods during children’s programmes has been banned since 2007. But research by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom has shown that children spend 64% of their TV viewing time watching shows not aimed specifically at them.

Health, medical and children’s organisations want ministers to introduce a tougher regime as part of the second phase of their childhood obesity strategy, due later this year.

An IFS briefing paper on children’s exposure to food and drink advertising on the small screen says: “50% of the TV advertising for food and drinks that children saw in 2015 was for products that are HFSS [high in fat, salt or sugar] or for restaurants and bars. [Of that] 39% was for products that were HFSS [and] 11% was for restaurants and bars, the majority of which was for fast food chains. (Over half of this was for McDonald’s).”

Significantly, 70% of the ads children see for HFSS products go out before the 9pm TV viewing watershed. Health campaigners are urging the government to ban all HFSS advertising before that time, because of the large numbers of under-18s who watch programmes in the early evening.

“In 2015, up to 35% of the TV adverts for food and drink that children saw would have been directly affected had restrictions applied before the watershed,” said Rebekah Stroud, a research economist at the IFS and co-author of the briefing.

Ads for HFSS products shown in breaks during family entertainment shows such as ITV’s The X Factor have attracted particular concern because children make up a large proportion of their audience.

“This report demonstrates in stark fashion the critical urgency of tackling our nationwide childhood obesity crisis,” said Sharon Hodgson MP, Labour’s public health minister.

“The prime minister must deliver substantial action in this year’s revised childhood obesity strategy, and stop her government’s reckless cuts to local authority and education budgets.”

The findings come days after NHS figures showed that 22,646 children aged 10 and 11 in England in school year six – one in 25 of that year group – are severely obese. That means they have been found to have a body mass index of at least 40.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said ministers were preparing further action on childhood obesity. “Our sugar tax is funding school sports programmes and nutritious breakfasts for the poorest children, and we’re investing in further research into the links between obesity and inequality.

“We’ve always said that our 2016 plan was the start of the conversation, not the final word on obesity. We are in the process of working up an updated plan, and will be in a position to say more shortly.”

Half of TV ads seen by children are for junk food and drink – report

Half of advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

Research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found that 50% of all TV advertisements seen by children aged between four and 15 are for products high in fat, salt or sugar.

The revelation comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity.

The advertising of such foods during children’s programmes has been banned since 2007. But research by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom has shown that children spend 64% of their TV viewing time watching shows not aimed specifically at them.

Health, medical and children’s organisations want ministers to introduce a tougher regime as part of the second phase of their childhood obesity strategy, due later this year.

An IFS briefing paper on children’s exposure to food and drink advertising on the small screen says: “50% of the TV advertising for food and drinks that children saw in 2015 was for products that are HFSS [high in fat, salt or sugar] or for restaurants and bars. [Of that] 39% was for products that were HFSS [and] 11% was for restaurants and bars, the majority of which was for fast food chains. (Over half of this was for McDonald’s).”

Significantly, 70% of the ads children see for HFSS products go out before the 9pm TV viewing watershed. Health campaigners are urging the government to ban all HFSS advertising before that time, because of the large numbers of under-18s who watch programmes in the early evening.

“In 2015, up to 35% of the TV adverts for food and drink that children saw would have been directly affected had restrictions applied before the watershed,” said Rebekah Stroud, a research economist at the IFS and co-author of the briefing.

Ads for HFSS products shown in breaks during family entertainment shows such as ITV’s The X Factor have attracted particular concern because children make up a large proportion of their audience.

“This report demonstrates in stark fashion the critical urgency of tackling our nationwide childhood obesity crisis,” said Sharon Hodgson MP, Labour’s public health minister.

“The prime minister must deliver substantial action in this year’s revised childhood obesity strategy, and stop her government’s reckless cuts to local authority and education budgets.”

The findings come days after NHS figures showed that 22,646 children aged 10 and 11 in England in school year six – one in 25 of that year group – are severely obese. That means they have been found to have a body mass index of at least 40.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said ministers were preparing further action on childhood obesity. “Our sugar tax is funding school sports programmes and nutritious breakfasts for the poorest children, and we’re investing in further research into the links between obesity and inequality.

“We’ve always said that our 2016 plan was the start of the conversation, not the final word on obesity. We are in the process of working up an updated plan, and will be in a position to say more shortly.”

Half of TV ads seen by children are for junk food and drink – report

Half of advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

Research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found that 50% of all TV advertisements seen by children aged between four and 15 are for products high in fat, salt or sugar.

The revelation comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity.

The advertising of such foods during children’s programmes has been banned since 2007. But research by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom has shown that children spend 64% of their TV viewing time watching shows not aimed specifically at them.

Health, medical and children’s organisations want ministers to introduce a tougher regime as part of the second phase of their childhood obesity strategy, due later this year.

An IFS briefing paper on children’s exposure to food and drink advertising on the small screen says: “50% of the TV advertising for food and drinks that children saw in 2015 was for products that are HFSS [high in fat, salt or sugar] or for restaurants and bars. [Of that] 39% was for products that were HFSS [and] 11% was for restaurants and bars, the majority of which was for fast food chains. (Over half of this was for McDonald’s).”

Significantly, 70% of the ads children see for HFSS products go out before the 9pm TV viewing watershed. Health campaigners are urging the government to ban all HFSS advertising before that time, because of the large numbers of under-18s who watch programmes in the early evening.

“In 2015, up to 35% of the TV adverts for food and drink that children saw would have been directly affected had restrictions applied before the watershed,” said Rebekah Stroud, a research economist at the IFS and co-author of the briefing.

Ads for HFSS products shown in breaks during family entertainment shows such as ITV’s The X Factor have attracted particular concern because children make up a large proportion of their audience.

“This report demonstrates in stark fashion the critical urgency of tackling our nationwide childhood obesity crisis,” said Sharon Hodgson MP, Labour’s public health minister.

“The prime minister must deliver substantial action in this year’s revised childhood obesity strategy, and stop her government’s reckless cuts to local authority and education budgets.”

The findings come days after NHS figures showed that 22,646 children aged 10 and 11 in England in school year six – one in 25 of that year group – are severely obese. That means they have been found to have a body mass index of at least 40.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said ministers were preparing further action on childhood obesity. “Our sugar tax is funding school sports programmes and nutritious breakfasts for the poorest children, and we’re investing in further research into the links between obesity and inequality.

“We’ve always said that our 2016 plan was the start of the conversation, not the final word on obesity. We are in the process of working up an updated plan, and will be in a position to say more shortly.”

Half of TV ads seen by children are for junk food and drink – report

Half of advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

Research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found that 50% of all TV advertisements seen by children aged between four and 15 are for products high in fat, salt or sugar.

The revelation comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity.

The advertising of such foods during children’s programmes has been banned since 2007. But research by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom has shown that children spend 64% of their TV viewing time watching shows not aimed specifically at them.

Health, medical and children’s organisations want ministers to introduce a tougher regime as part of the second phase of their childhood obesity strategy, due later this year.

An IFS briefing paper on children’s exposure to food and drink advertising on the small screen says: “50% of the TV advertising for food and drinks that children saw in 2015 was for products that are HFSS [high in fat, salt or sugar] or for restaurants and bars. [Of that] 39% was for products that were HFSS [and] 11% was for restaurants and bars, the majority of which was for fast food chains. (Over half of this was for McDonald’s).”

Significantly, 70% of the ads children see for HFSS products go out before the 9pm TV viewing watershed. Health campaigners are urging the government to ban all HFSS advertising before that time, because of the large numbers of under-18s who watch programmes in the early evening.

“In 2015, up to 35% of the TV adverts for food and drink that children saw would have been directly affected had restrictions applied before the watershed,” said Rebekah Stroud, a research economist at the IFS and co-author of the briefing.

Ads for HFSS products shown in breaks during family entertainment shows such as ITV’s The X Factor have attracted particular concern because children make up a large proportion of their audience.

“This report demonstrates in stark fashion the critical urgency of tackling our nationwide childhood obesity crisis,” said Sharon Hodgson MP, Labour’s public health minister.

“The prime minister must deliver substantial action in this year’s revised childhood obesity strategy, and stop her government’s reckless cuts to local authority and education budgets.”

The findings come days after NHS figures showed that 22,646 children aged 10 and 11 in England in school year six – one in 25 of that year group – are severely obese. That means they have been found to have a body mass index of at least 40.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said ministers were preparing further action on childhood obesity. “Our sugar tax is funding school sports programmes and nutritious breakfasts for the poorest children, and we’re investing in further research into the links between obesity and inequality.

“We’ve always said that our 2016 plan was the start of the conversation, not the final word on obesity. We are in the process of working up an updated plan, and will be in a position to say more shortly.”

Half of TV ads seen by children are for junk food and drink – report

Half of advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

Research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found that 50% of all TV advertisements seen by children aged between four and 15 are for products high in fat, salt or sugar.

The revelation comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity.

The advertising of such foods during children’s programmes has been banned since 2007. But research by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom has shown that children spend 64% of their TV viewing time watching shows not aimed specifically at them.

Health, medical and children’s organisations want ministers to introduce a tougher regime as part of the second phase of their childhood obesity strategy, due later this year.

An IFS briefing paper on children’s exposure to food and drink advertising on the small screen says: “50% of the TV advertising for food and drinks that children saw in 2015 was for products that are HFSS [high in fat, salt or sugar] or for restaurants and bars. [Of that] 39% was for products that were HFSS [and] 11% was for restaurants and bars, the majority of which was for fast food chains. (Over half of this was for McDonald’s).”

Significantly, 70% of the ads children see for HFSS products go out before the 9pm TV viewing watershed. Health campaigners are urging the government to ban all HFSS advertising before that time, because of the large numbers of under-18s who watch programmes in the early evening.

“In 2015, up to 35% of the TV adverts for food and drink that children saw would have been directly affected had restrictions applied before the watershed,” said Rebekah Stroud, a research economist at the IFS and co-author of the briefing.

Ads for HFSS products shown in breaks during family entertainment shows such as ITV’s The X Factor have attracted particular concern because children make up a large proportion of their audience.

“This report demonstrates in stark fashion the critical urgency of tackling our nationwide childhood obesity crisis,” said Sharon Hodgson MP, Labour’s public health minister.

“The prime minister must deliver substantial action in this year’s revised childhood obesity strategy, and stop her government’s reckless cuts to local authority and education budgets.”

The findings come days after NHS figures showed that 22,646 children aged 10 and 11 in England in school year six – one in 25 of that year group – are severely obese. That means they have been found to have a body mass index of at least 40.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said ministers were preparing further action on childhood obesity. “Our sugar tax is funding school sports programmes and nutritious breakfasts for the poorest children, and we’re investing in further research into the links between obesity and inequality.

“We’ve always said that our 2016 plan was the start of the conversation, not the final word on obesity. We are in the process of working up an updated plan, and will be in a position to say more shortly.”

Half of TV ads seen by children are for junk food and drink – report

Half of advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

Research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found that 50% of all TV advertisements seen by children aged between four and 15 are for products high in fat, salt or sugar.

The revelation comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity.

The advertising of such foods during children’s programmes has been banned since 2007. But research by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom has shown that children spend 64% of their TV viewing time watching shows not aimed specifically at them.

Health, medical and children’s organisations want ministers to introduce a tougher regime as part of the second phase of their childhood obesity strategy, due later this year.

An IFS briefing paper on children’s exposure to food and drink advertising on the small screen says: “50% of the TV advertising for food and drinks that children saw in 2015 was for products that are HFSS [high in fat, salt or sugar] or for restaurants and bars. [Of that] 39% was for products that were HFSS [and] 11% was for restaurants and bars, the majority of which was for fast food chains. (Over half of this was for McDonald’s).”

Significantly, 70% of the ads children see for HFSS products go out before the 9pm TV viewing watershed. Health campaigners are urging the government to ban all HFSS advertising before that time, because of the large numbers of under-18s who watch programmes in the early evening.

“In 2015, up to 35% of the TV adverts for food and drink that children saw would have been directly affected had restrictions applied before the watershed,” said Rebekah Stroud, a research economist at the IFS and co-author of the briefing.

Ads for HFSS products shown in breaks during family entertainment shows such as ITV’s The X Factor have attracted particular concern because children make up a large proportion of their audience.

“This report demonstrates in stark fashion the critical urgency of tackling our nationwide childhood obesity crisis,” said Sharon Hodgson MP, Labour’s public health minister.

“The prime minister must deliver substantial action in this year’s revised childhood obesity strategy, and stop her government’s reckless cuts to local authority and education budgets.”

The findings come days after NHS figures showed that 22,646 children aged 10 and 11 in England in school year six – one in 25 of that year group – are severely obese. That means they have been found to have a body mass index of at least 40.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said ministers were preparing further action on childhood obesity. “Our sugar tax is funding school sports programmes and nutritious breakfasts for the poorest children, and we’re investing in further research into the links between obesity and inequality.

“We’ve always said that our 2016 plan was the start of the conversation, not the final word on obesity. We are in the process of working up an updated plan, and will be in a position to say more shortly.”

Cancer patient waited 541 days for NHS treatment, report says

The longest waits for cancer treatment in England have soared since 2010, with one patient waiting 541 days, analysis suggests.

Two-thirds of NHS trusts reported having at least one cancer patient waiting more than six months last year, while almost seven in 10 (69%) trusts said they had a worse longest wait than in 2010. This was reflected in the average longest wait rising to 213 days – 16 days longer than in the year the Conservatives entered government.

The official target requires at least 85% of cancer patients to have their first treatment within 62 days of referral by their GP, but this has not been met for 27 months in a row.

More than 100,000 people have waited more than two months for treatment to start since the target was first missed in January 2014.

The longest waiting times data was obtained by Labour through freedom of information requests to England’s 172 acute and community health trusts, to which 95 responded.

Jonathan Ashworth, the shadow health secretary, said: “The number of people needing cancer treatment has risen sharply in the past 10 years and the government has simply failed to increase availability of services at the rate required.

“The truth is that the brilliant efforts of NHS staff around the country to deliver the best for their patients are being hampered by tight NHS budgets. Years of underfunding and abject failure to invest in the frontline doctors and nurses we need, means Theresa May is letting down cancer patients.

“Now we know the astonishing truth that some patients are waiting a year or more just to get treatment. It’s simply not good enough.”

The number of patients waiting more than 62 days last year was double that in 2010 (26,693 compared with 13,354), including 10,000 who waited for more than three months, NHS statistics show.

Every trust bar two who replied to Labour’s survey said that at least one patient had waited more than 62 days for treatment.

The figures also showed a deterioration in longest waits for two other key cancer targets since 2010.

After receiving a diagnosis of cancer, patients should receive their first definitive treatment within a month (31 days) and after an urgent referral for suspected cancer they should see a consultant within two weeks.

In both cases, as with the 62 days target, two-thirds of trusts had lengthier longest waits last year than in 2010. The average longest wait to start definitive treatment rose to 90 days – three higher than in 2010 – with one patient waiting 254 days. The average longest wait for a consultant appointment increased to 66 days – eight time higher than seven years ago – with the worst example being a patient who waited 377 days.

In an ideal world, people would start treatment within a month of being diagnosed, according to Cancer Research UK.

Sara Bainbridge, a policy manager at the charity, said: “Part of the reason why hospitals are struggling to meet the target is because NHS diagnostic services are short-staffed. The government must make sure there are more staff to deliver the tests and treatment that people need on time. The long-term plan for the NHS, which is being developed now, is a good opportunity to be more ambitious about cancer survival and increase staff numbers.”

Andrew Kaye, the head of policy at Macmillan Cancer Support, said: “These findings show that despite the tireless work of doctors and nurses, it appears that some cancer patients are still enduring shockingly long waits to start treatment.

“Long delays can put people under incredible stress at an already difficult time and could also mean that someone’s health could take a turn for the worse.”

A spokesman for the Department of Health and Social Care said: “Cancer care has improved significantly in recent years, with around 7,000 people alive today who would not have been if mortality rates stayed the same as in 2010.

“Nobody should wait longer than necessary for treatment and, despite a 115% increase in referrals since 2010, the vast majority of people start treatment within 62 days – backed by our £600m investment to improve cancer services.”

Cancer patient waited 541 days for NHS treatment, report says

The longest waits for cancer treatment in England have soared since 2010, with one patient waiting 541 days, analysis suggests.

Two-thirds of NHS trusts reported having at least one cancer patient waiting more than six months last year, while almost seven in 10 (69%) trusts said they had a worse longest wait than in 2010. This was reflected in the average longest wait rising to 213 days – 16 days longer than in the year the Conservatives entered government.

The official target requires at least 85% of cancer patients to have their first treatment within 62 days of referral by their GP, but this has not been met for 27 months in a row.

More than 100,000 people have waited more than two months for treatment to start since the target was first missed in January 2014.

The longest waiting times data was obtained by Labour through freedom of information requests to England’s 172 acute and community health trusts, to which 95 responded.

Jonathan Ashworth, the shadow health secretary, said: “The number of people needing cancer treatment has risen sharply in the past 10 years and the government has simply failed to increase availability of services at the rate required.

“The truth is that the brilliant efforts of NHS staff around the country to deliver the best for their patients are being hampered by tight NHS budgets. Years of underfunding and abject failure to invest in the frontline doctors and nurses we need, means Theresa May is letting down cancer patients.

“Now we know the astonishing truth that some patients are waiting a year or more just to get treatment. It’s simply not good enough.”

The number of patients waiting more than 62 days last year was double that in 2010 (26,693 compared with 13,354), including 10,000 who waited for more than three months, NHS statistics show.

Every trust bar two who replied to Labour’s survey said that at least one patient had waited more than 62 days for treatment.

The figures also showed a deterioration in longest waits for two other key cancer targets since 2010.

After receiving a diagnosis of cancer, patients should receive their first definitive treatment within a month (31 days) and after an urgent referral for suspected cancer they should see a consultant within two weeks.

In both cases, as with the 62 days target, two-thirds of trusts had lengthier longest waits last year than in 2010. The average longest wait to start definitive treatment rose to 90 days – three higher than in 2010 – with one patient waiting 254 days. The average longest wait for a consultant appointment increased to 66 days – eight time higher than seven years ago – with the worst example being a patient who waited 377 days.

In an ideal world, people would start treatment within a month of being diagnosed, according to Cancer Research UK.

Sara Bainbridge, a policy manager at the charity, said: “Part of the reason why hospitals are struggling to meet the target is because NHS diagnostic services are short-staffed. The government must make sure there are more staff to deliver the tests and treatment that people need on time. The long-term plan for the NHS, which is being developed now, is a good opportunity to be more ambitious about cancer survival and increase staff numbers.”

Andrew Kaye, the head of policy at Macmillan Cancer Support, said: “These findings show that despite the tireless work of doctors and nurses, it appears that some cancer patients are still enduring shockingly long waits to start treatment.

“Long delays can put people under incredible stress at an already difficult time and could also mean that someone’s health could take a turn for the worse.”

A spokesman for the Department of Health and Social Care said: “Cancer care has improved significantly in recent years, with around 7,000 people alive today who would not have been if mortality rates stayed the same as in 2010.

“Nobody should wait longer than necessary for treatment and, despite a 115% increase in referrals since 2010, the vast majority of people start treatment within 62 days – backed by our £600m investment to improve cancer services.”

Cancer patient waited 541 days for NHS treatment, report says

The longest waits for cancer treatment in England have soared since 2010, with one patient waiting 541 days, analysis suggests.

Two-thirds of NHS trusts reported having at least one cancer patient waiting more than six months last year, while almost seven in 10 (69%) trusts said they had a worse longest wait than in 2010. This was reflected in the average longest wait rising to 213 days – 16 days longer than in the year the Conservatives entered government.

The official target requires at least 85% of cancer patients to have their first treatment within 62 days of referral by their GP, but this has not been met for 27 months in a row.

More than 100,000 people have waited more than two months for treatment to start since the target was first missed in January 2014.

The longest waiting times data was obtained by Labour through freedom of information requests to England’s 172 acute and community health trusts, to which 95 responded.

Jonathan Ashworth, the shadow health secretary, said: “The number of people needing cancer treatment has risen sharply in the past 10 years and the government has simply failed to increase availability of services at the rate required.

“The truth is that the brilliant efforts of NHS staff around the country to deliver the best for their patients are being hampered by tight NHS budgets. Years of underfunding and abject failure to invest in the frontline doctors and nurses we need, means Theresa May is letting down cancer patients.

“Now we know the astonishing truth that some patients are waiting a year or more just to get treatment. It’s simply not good enough.”

The number of patients waiting more than 62 days last year was double that in 2010 (26,693 compared with 13,354), including 10,000 who waited for more than three months, NHS statistics show.

Every trust bar two who replied to Labour’s survey said that at least one patient had waited more than 62 days for treatment.

The figures also showed a deterioration in longest waits for two other key cancer targets since 2010.

After receiving a diagnosis of cancer, patients should receive their first definitive treatment within a month (31 days) and after an urgent referral for suspected cancer they should see a consultant within two weeks.

In both cases, as with the 62 days target, two-thirds of trusts had lengthier longest waits last year than in 2010. The average longest wait to start definitive treatment rose to 90 days – three higher than in 2010 – with one patient waiting 254 days. The average longest wait for a consultant appointment increased to 66 days – eight time higher than seven years ago – with the worst example being a patient who waited 377 days.

In an ideal world, people would start treatment within a month of being diagnosed, according to Cancer Research UK.

Sara Bainbridge, a policy manager at the charity, said: “Part of the reason why hospitals are struggling to meet the target is because NHS diagnostic services are short-staffed. The government must make sure there are more staff to deliver the tests and treatment that people need on time. The long-term plan for the NHS, which is being developed now, is a good opportunity to be more ambitious about cancer survival and increase staff numbers.”

Andrew Kaye, the head of policy at Macmillan Cancer Support, said: “These findings show that despite the tireless work of doctors and nurses, it appears that some cancer patients are still enduring shockingly long waits to start treatment.

“Long delays can put people under incredible stress at an already difficult time and could also mean that someone’s health could take a turn for the worse.”

A spokesman for the Department of Health and Social Care said: “Cancer care has improved significantly in recent years, with around 7,000 people alive today who would not have been if mortality rates stayed the same as in 2010.

“Nobody should wait longer than necessary for treatment and, despite a 115% increase in referrals since 2010, the vast majority of people start treatment within 62 days – backed by our £600m investment to improve cancer services.”