Tag Archives: says

Bigger wine glasses make us drink too much, says researcher

Wine glasses have increased in size from a capacity of 65ml 300 years ago to 450ml today and the change has encouraged us to drink far more than we should, according to a behavioural scientist speaking at the Hay festival.

Theresa Marteau, director of the behaviour and health research unit at Cambridge University, said her team had looked at 18th-century wine glasses at the Ashmolean museum in Oxford, 19th-century wine glasses owned by Buckingham Palace, and more recent glasses in John Lewis catalogues and the evidence was clear: they had got bigger.

“There has been a gradual increase in capacity from 65ml to 450ml,” she told Hay festival. “The key period was the 1990s.” Size matters because the bigger the glass the more we are inclined to consume, she said.

Her team carried out a six-week experiment in a Cambridge wine bar where 175ml of wine was sold in three different sized glasses at different times. Sales in the biggest glasses rose 14%, with no difference in the other two.

Plates and dishes are also getting bigger, which may be one of the reasons 65% of the UK population is overweight or obese.

Marteau described an experiment where two sets of people sat at a dinner table eating soup. One couple had a bottomless soup bowl that was gradually filled up from below while the others had a standard bowl. The first couple ate twice as much but felt as full as the ones who ate from the normal soup bowl.

Smaller plates and dishes would have an effect on public health, Marteau said. “If we made sizes smaller for all food tableware, for every occasion we encounter food the effects of size would be to reduce how much we consume by up to 16% in adults per day.”

Marteau’s team looks at why information about the risks of smoking, drinking, eating and not doing enough exercise does not seem to change our unhealthy behaviour.

Sometimes it was as simple as the message, she said. A warning that the ice is thin and you may die is more offputting than a message that the sofa you are sitting on could be a killer.

Our environment also has a strong influence on behaviour, whether that is how safe streets are to go for walks on, or how big the products are with a slice of white bread increasing in size by 11% in 20 years in the UK.

Marteau said she was not at Hay plugging a book; all of the research carried out by her team is available free online. But she is keen to do more research into British drinking habits. “I should say anyone who has control of large bars such as Wetherspoons, we would love to collaborate with you.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

General election 2017: May says ‘there’s no Mayism’, only ‘solid Conservatism’ at manifesto launch – politics live

12:50

Afternoon summary

12:36

12:32

Labour accuse Tories of making around 60 unfunded spending commitments

Updated

11:27

11:15

Tories plan to merge Serious Fraud Office with National Crime Agency

Buried in Theresa May’s manifesto is a commitment to merge the Serious Fraud Office with the National Crime Agency. It says:

We will strengthen Britain’s response to white collar crime by incorporating the Serious Fraud Office into the National Crime Agency, improving intelligence sharing and bolstering the investigation of serious fraud, money laundering and financial crime.

The idea has reportedly been on her to-do list for some time.

Reaction from anti-corruption groups and specialist lawyers has thus far been uniformly negative. Stephen Parkinson, the head of criminal litigation at Kingsley Napley, said:

This is a dreadful decision. The NCA does not have the capability or the expertise to investigate complex, serious fraud, nor, I suspect, the desire. This is a real step back from the UK’s commitment to tackle serious economic crime.

Robert Barrington, the executive director of the anti-corruption group Transparency International, warned the move would jeopardise the freedom from political interference that the SFO’s investigations enjoy:

The underlying concern is that this could be a crude attempt at either cost-saving or to neuter the Bribery Act so that the UK can increase its exports at the expense of the stability, security and economic development of our overseas trading partners.

An SFO spokesperson said: “This is a political pledge and we cannot comment. The organisation of law enforcement is a matter for ministers.”

Updated

11:07

11:05

The Conservative manifesto includes a proposal to overhaul voter registration laws by including a requirement for voters to show ID at polling stations, in order to crack down on election fraud.
The manifesto claims that the Tories will tackle every aspect of electoral fraud. “The British public deserves to have confidence in our democracy,” it states.

We will legislate to ensure that a form of identification must be presented before voting, to reform postal voting and to improve other aspects of the elections process to ensure that our elections are the most secure in the world.


But the policy is a controversial one, with evidence that strict voter ID rules in some US states have disproportionately disadvantaged poor and minority voters.

Furthermore, there is little evidence that electoral fraud is widespread in the UK, which has a system that is respected around the world, including by international monitoring organisations.

Labour has previously said that millions of people may be disenfranchised by the plans. In December, Cat Smith, Labour’s shadow minister for voter engagement, raised concerns that 7.5% of the electorate may not have the right kind of identification in order to exercise their right to vote.

Voter ID requirements were also criticised as a “sledgehammer to crack a nut” by the Electoral Reform Society, a pressure group campaigning for reform of the democratic system. “The government should think very carefully before introducing barriers to voting,” said its chief executive, Katie Ghose. “There is simply no evidence to suggest that electoral fraud is widespread across the UK. Where it has occurred it has been isolated and should be tackled locally.”

Updated

11:01

Tories drop pledge to halve disability employment gap

Updated

10:49

10:44

While the Conservative manifesto includes the easing of fracking rules and the capping of household energy bills there is a very significant omission – no mention at all of the fleet of new nuclear power stations the party has always previously backed.

The 2015 Tory manifesto promised “a significant expansion in new nuclear”. The new one promises nothing at all. The deal for a French-Chinese partnership to build the first new reactors in a generation at Hinkley Point in Somerset is signed. But vast costs of nuclear power are looking ever more expensive as renewables costs plummet and grids gets smarter at managing demand.

It may be that the serious financial woes at Toshiba, which has placed another proposed plant in jeopardy, was the final straw. The Tories may have realised that hiking energy bills to fund large subsidies to foreign state-owned companies is not the best way to power the UK.

Updated

10:37

General election 2017: May says ‘there’s no Mayism’, only ‘solid Conservatism’ at manifesto launch – politics live

12:36

12:32

Labour accuse Tories of making around 60 unfunded spending commitments

11:27

11:15

Tories plan to merge Serious Fraud Office with National Crime Agency

Buried in Theresa May’s manifesto is a commitment to merge the Serious Fraud Office with the National Crime Agency. It says:

We will strengthen Britain’s response to white collar crime by incorporating the Serious Fraud Office into the National Crime Agency, improving intelligence sharing and bolstering the investigation of serious fraud, money laundering and financial crime.

The idea has reportedly been on her to-do list for some time.

Reaction from anti-corruption groups and specialist lawyers has thus far been uniformly negative. Stephen Parkinson, the head of criminal litigation at Kingsley Napley, said:

This is a dreadful decision. The NCA does not have the capability or the expertise to investigate complex, serious fraud, nor, I suspect, the desire. This is a real step back from the UK’s commitment to tackle serious economic crime.

Robert Barrington, the executive director of the anti-corruption group Transparency International, warned the move would jeopardise the freedom from political interference that the SFO’s investigations enjoy:

The underlying concern is that this could be a crude attempt at either cost-saving or to neuter the Bribery Act so that the UK can increase its exports at the expense of the stability, security and economic development of our overseas trading partners.

An SFO spokesperson said: “This is a political pledge and we cannot comment. The organisation of law enforcement is a matter for ministers.”

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The Conservative manifesto includes a proposal to overhaul voter registration laws by including a requirement for voters to show ID at polling stations, in order to crack down on election fraud.
The manifesto claims that the Tories will tackle every aspect of electoral fraud. “The British public deserves to have confidence in our democracy,” it states.

We will legislate to ensure that a form of identification must be presented before voting, to reform postal voting and to improve other aspects of the elections process to ensure that our elections are the most secure in the world.


But the policy is a controversial one, with evidence that strict voter ID rules in some US states have disproportionately disadvantaged poor and minority voters.

Furthermore, there is little evidence that electoral fraud is widespread in the UK, which has a system that is respected around the world, including by international monitoring organisations.

Labour has previously said that millions of people may be disenfranchised by the plans. In December, Cat Smith, Labour’s shadow minister for voter engagement, raised concerns that 7.5% of the electorate may not have the right kind of identification in order to exercise their right to vote.

Voter ID requirements were also criticised as a “sledgehammer to crack a nut” by the Electoral Reform Society, a pressure group campaigning for reform of the democratic system. “The government should think very carefully before introducing barriers to voting,” said its chief executive, Katie Ghose. “There is simply no evidence to suggest that electoral fraud is widespread across the UK. Where it has occurred it has been isolated and should be tackled locally.”

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Tories drop pledge to halve disability employment gap

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While the Conservative manifesto includes the easing of fracking rules and the capping of household energy bills there is a very significant omission – no mention at all of the fleet of new nuclear power stations the party has always previously backed.

The 2015 Tory manifesto promised “a significant expansion in new nuclear”. The new one promises nothing at all. The deal for a French-Chinese partnership to build the first new reactors in a generation at Hinkley Point in Somerset is signed. But vast costs of nuclear power are looking ever more expensive as renewables costs plummet and grids gets smarter at managing demand.

It may be that the serious financial woes at Toshiba, which has placed another proposed plant in jeopardy, was the final straw. The Tories may have realised that hiking energy bills to fund large subsidies to foreign state-owned companies is not the best way to power the UK.

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