Tag Archives: Science

Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In March 1867, the Lancet published an article by surgeon Joseph Lister that would change the healthcare landscape completely. The article was the first of several, detailing the culmination of Lister’s life work exploring the connection between germs and infection. Fast forward a century-and-a-half and today Joseph Lister is widely known as the father of antiseptic surgery, saving countless lives both in hospitals and further afield. But how was it that Lister came to his groundbreaking conclusions? How did his colleagues react? And, looking at the present situation, what challenges might we face that Lister would be all too familiar with?

This week, helping Nicola Davis delve into the life and work of Joseph Lister is Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, historian of science and author of The Butchering Art. And to help join the dots between Lister’s groundbreaking work and the challenges healthcare professionals face today – including antibiotic resistance – is chief medical officer for England and chief medical advisor to the UK government Professor Dame Sally Davies.

Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In March 1867, the Lancet published an article by surgeon Joseph Lister that would change the healthcare landscape completely. The article was the first of several, detailing the culmination of Lister’s life work exploring the connection between germs and infection. Fast forward a century-and-a-half and today Joseph Lister is widely known as the father of antiseptic surgery, saving countless lives both in hospitals and further afield. But how was it that Lister came to his groundbreaking conclusions? How did his colleagues react? And, looking at the present situation, what challenges might we face that Lister would be all too familiar with?

This week, helping Nicola Davis delve into the life and work of Joseph Lister is Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, historian of science and author of The Butchering Art. And to help join the dots between Lister’s groundbreaking work and the challenges healthcare professionals face today – including antibiotic resistance – is chief medical officer for England and chief medical advisor to the UK government Professor Dame Sally Davies.

Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In March 1867, the Lancet published an article by surgeon Joseph Lister that would change the healthcare landscape completely. The article was the first of several, detailing the culmination of Lister’s life work exploring the connection between germs and infection. Fast forward a century-and-a-half and today Joseph Lister is widely known as the father of antiseptic surgery, saving countless lives both in hospitals and further afield. But how was it that Lister came to his groundbreaking conclusions? How did his colleagues react? And, looking at the present situation, what challenges might we face that Lister would be all too familiar with?

This week, helping Nicola Davis delve into the life and work of Joseph Lister is Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, historian of science and author of The Butchering Art. And to help join the dots between Lister’s groundbreaking work and the challenges healthcare professionals face today – including antibiotic resistance – is chief medical officer for England and chief medical advisor to the UK government Professor Dame Sally Davies.

Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In March 1867, the Lancet published an article by surgeon Joseph Lister that would change the healthcare landscape completely. The article was the first of several, detailing the culmination of Lister’s life work exploring the connection between germs and infection. Fast forward a century-and-a-half and today Joseph Lister is widely known as the father of antiseptic surgery, saving countless lives both in hospitals and further afield. But how was it that Lister came to his groundbreaking conclusions? How did his colleagues react? And, looking at the present situation, what challenges might we face that Lister would be all too familiar with?

This week, helping Nicola Davis delve into the life and work of Joseph Lister is Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, historian of science and author of The Butchering Art. And to help join the dots between Lister’s groundbreaking work and the challenges healthcare professionals face today – including antibiotic resistance – is chief medical officer for England and chief medical advisor to the UK government Professor Dame Sally Davies.

Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In March 1867, the Lancet published an article by surgeon Joseph Lister that would change the healthcare landscape completely. The article was the first of several, detailing the culmination of Lister’s life work exploring the connection between germs and infection. Fast forward a century-and-a-half and today Joseph Lister is widely known as the father of antiseptic surgery, saving countless lives both in hospitals and further afield. But how was it that Lister came to his groundbreaking conclusions? How did his colleagues react? And, looking at the present situation, what challenges might we face that Lister would be all too familiar with?

This week, helping Nicola Davis delve into the life and work of Joseph Lister is Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, historian of science and author of The Butchering Art. And to help join the dots between Lister’s groundbreaking work and the challenges healthcare professionals face today – including antibiotic resistance – is chief medical officer for England and chief medical advisor to the UK government Professor Dame Sally Davies.

Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In March 1867, the Lancet published an article by surgeon Joseph Lister that would change the healthcare landscape completely. The article was the first of several, detailing the culmination of Lister’s life work exploring the connection between germs and infection. Fast forward a century-and-a-half and today Joseph Lister is widely known as the father of antiseptic surgery, saving countless lives both in hospitals and further afield. But how was it that Lister came to his groundbreaking conclusions? How did his colleagues react? And, looking at the present situation, what challenges might we face that Lister would be all too familiar with?

This week, helping Nicola Davis delve into the life and work of Joseph Lister is Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, historian of science and author of The Butchering Art. And to help join the dots between Lister’s groundbreaking work and the challenges healthcare professionals face today – including antibiotic resistance – is chief medical officer for England and chief medical advisor to the UK government Professor Dame Sally Davies.

How does socioeconomic position affect our health? – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In 2016, the New Policy Institute estimated that 13.5 million people in the UK – that’s a fifth of the population – were living in poverty. For this shockingly large group, life doesn’t get much harder and the impact goes far beyond their financial position. Their general health takes a hit too, cutting short their life expectancy. And with a slew of recent scientific studies examining the issue, we ask: what does poverty do to our health and wellbeing? And what physiological processes might be at work?

To help try and answer these questions, Nicola Davis speaks with Imperial College London’s chair in environmental epidemiology, Professor Paolo Vineis, about a recent study looking at the link between socioeconomic position and life expectancy in over a million men and women. And helping Ian Sample delve into a possible physiological links between socioeconomic position and health is the University of Essex’s professor of biological and social epidemiology, Meena Kumari.

How does socioeconomic position affect our health? – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In 2016, the New Policy Institute estimated that 13.5 million people in the UK – that’s a fifth of the population – were living in poverty. For this shockingly large group, life doesn’t get much harder and the impact goes far beyond their financial position. Their general health takes a hit too, cutting short their life expectancy. And with a slew of recent scientific studies examining the issue, we ask: what does poverty do to our health and wellbeing? And what physiological processes might be at work?

To help try and answer these questions, Nicola Davis speaks with Imperial College London’s chair in environmental epidemiology, Professor Paolo Vineis, about a recent study looking at the link between socioeconomic position and life expectancy in over a million men and women. And helping Ian Sample delve into a possible physiological links between socioeconomic position and health is the University of Essex’s professor of biological and social epidemiology, Meena Kumari.

How does socioeconomic position affect our health? – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In 2016, the New Policy Institute estimated that 13.5 million people in the UK – that’s a fifth of the population – were living in poverty. For this shockingly large group, life doesn’t get much harder and the impact goes far beyond their financial position. Their general health takes a hit too, cutting short their life expectancy. And with a slew of recent scientific studies examining the issue, we ask: what does poverty do to our health and wellbeing? And what physiological processes might be at work?

To help try and answer these questions, Nicola Davis speaks with Imperial College London’s chair in environmental epidemiology, Professor Paolo Vineis, about a recent study looking at the link between socioeconomic position and life expectancy in over a million men and women. And helping Ian Sample delve into a possible physiological links between socioeconomic position and health is the University of Essex’s professor of biological and social epidemiology, Meena Kumari.

How does socioeconomic position affect our health? – Science Weekly podcast

Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In 2016, the New Policy Institute estimated that 13.5 million people in the UK – that’s a fifth of the population – were living in poverty. For this shockingly large group, life doesn’t get much harder and the impact goes far beyond their financial position. Their general health takes a hit too, cutting short their life expectancy. And with a slew of recent scientific studies examining the issue, we ask: what does poverty do to our health and wellbeing? And what physiological processes might be at work?

To help try and answer these questions, Nicola Davis speaks with Imperial College London’s chair in environmental epidemiology, Professor Paolo Vineis, about a recent study looking at the link between socioeconomic position and life expectancy in over a million men and women. And helping Ian Sample delve into a possible physiological links between socioeconomic position and health is the University of Essex’s professor of biological and social epidemiology, Meena Kumari.