Tag Archives: should

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Digital autopsies should be standard for probable natural deaths, says study

Digital autopsies should be the first-line approach in postmortem investigations of probable natural death, and should be offered free of charge to families, researchers have said.

About 90,000 autopsies requested by coroners are carried out in England and Wales every year, with the majority of deaths found to be a result of natural causes.

A switch to body-scanning techniques could prove valuable, say researchers, since a traditional autopsy can be upsetting for the bereaved and a number of religions, including Islam and Judaism, teach that a body should be buried quickly and not violated after death.

“The main benefit is about avoiding the autopsy,” said Bruno Morgan, co-author of the research from the University of Leicester. “The autopsy is not just a simple operation, it is opening [the body] up fully, taking all the organs out and slicing them all into pieces.”

CT scans have long been used to aid postmortem investigations, while more recently studies have explored targeted coronary angiography – another CT scanner-based technique that involves inserting a catheter into an artery and is used to reveal whether blockages are present in the coronary arteries, and to investigate the heart itself.

The latter is a major step forward, since one limitation of digital autopsies has been the difficulty of standard CT scans in establishing causes of death such as coronary heart disease.

[embedded content]

The latest study offers a large-scale comparison of the accuracy of the combined CT techniques to traditional autopsy.

“This paper is the first one that has come out and says this is as accurate as autopsy is in this setting. It works and therefore it is a valid alternative,” said Morgan.

Writing in the Lancet, researchers led by a team at the University of Leicester describe how they studied 241 cases of adults who had died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes or had died a non-suspicious unnatural death.

Each was assessed by a postmortem CT scan, with targeted coronary angiography successfully carried out in 85% of the cases. Standard autopsies were then carried out for each case, with the pathologists not told about the findings from the body scans.

After excluding 31 cases, including 24 cases for which the cause of death was clearly traumatic, such as a gunshot wound, the team found that the body-scan approach gave a cause of death, based on “the balance of probabilities”, in 92% of cases.

In 11% of this group, results from either the scans or the autopsy were at odds with findings from a combination of the two. Further analysis revealed that these discrepancies were evenly split between errors in the body-scan approach and errors in the traditional autopsy.

The team say the gold standard for postmortem is the use of both traditional autopsy and body scans, but say the findings support a move to using digital autopsy as the first-line technique in cases of probable natural death. Should more evidence be required, they add, a traditional autopsy can subsequently be carried out.

The public are already allowed to request – usually at a cost of about £500, typically paid by the family – that digital autopsies are used for postmortem investigations where appropriate.

But Morgan says that option should be made available free of charge – a service currently only offered by a small number of councils.

“If you don’t want an invasive autopsy on yourself or on your family, you should be raising the debate and saying why can’t the council pay for this?” he said. “It strikes me that it is wrong that we should make people pay for something that is a statutory obligation,” he added.

Dr Mike Osborn, a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, said that postmortem investigations are vital in understanding why people die, as well as improving understanding of disease. But he acknowledged that autopsies can be distressing and clash with religious beliefs.

The development of digital autopsies, including those based on CT scans, he added, was exciting and important. While Osborn noted that some conditions still require a diagnosis from a traditional autopsy, he welcomed further research in the field to reduce the number of traditional autopsies required. “The accuracy of cross-sectional imaging postmortem has improved over the last 20 years and is likely to continue to do so,” he said. “The College fully supports further research in this area while reinforcing the need for thorough and robust governance in this emerging field.”

Male suicide: ‘Gender should not be a death sentence’

We take a two-fold approach to changing and saving lives: firstly providing support for men who are down or in crisis, and secondly campaigning for culture change to tackle outdated stereotypes of masculinity that prevent men seeking help.

We do this in the face of a problem that is deeply entrenched. Many men feel forced to stoically “man up” (whatever that means) and grind through bad times without societal permission to open up or seek help. Calm’s research shows that while 67% of women tell someone about going through depression, only 55% of men do the same.

The result? Men are three times more likely than women to take their own lives and suicide is the single biggest killer of men aged between 20 and 49 – something the Duke of Cambridge describes as “an appalling stain on our society”.

But the tide is turning. Since Calm was founded 10 years ago, awareness of male suicide has trebled. Definitively, men are talking more. Calm alone has taken 200,000 helpline calls to date, and prevented more than 1,000 suicides.

The work of organisations and campaigns such as Lift The Weight and the royals’ mental health campaign Heads Together (Calm is a partner charity of the latter) – is a massive step forward. Historically, the alpha-male archetype has had no time for conversations about emotions but, in recent weeks, this has been dismissed by men such as Stormzy, Rio Ferdinand, and Calm’s patron Professor Green – strong, famous, tough men explaining how communication has, in some way, saved their lives.

There is still much work to be done. The emphasis now is to move beyond the rallying cry to open up. We must better equip ourselves, our mates, our workplaces, schools and health services to support those who need it. And we start by building a generation who believe that society’s ideas of your gender should not be a death sentence.

In the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123.
In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255.

In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14.

Should over-the-counter medical abortion be available? | Daniel Grossman

The coat hanger – often with a red line through it – is a powerful feminist symbol. Conjuring images of women suffering unspeakable consequences of unsafe abortion, the coat hanger sends a foreboding message about a past we must not return to. The implications are clear: abortions women give themselves when they cannot access legal services are dangerous.

While the coat hanger rhetoric has been useful for the abortion rights movement, it has become problematic in the 21st century. Coat hangers are no longer the method of choice for women who want to end a pregnancy on their own. In my research in Texas, women much more commonly report using medications or herbs when they try to self-induce an abortion. Some of these medications are very safe and effective, while the problem with herbs is that they are often ineffective.

This representation of self-abortion as always dangerous is also problematic, because women may in fact be able to safely have an abortion on their own without medical supervision. Focusing solely on the coat hanger imagery also overshadows any conversation about women’s agency and self-determination when it comes to their healthcare.

Not all women who attempt to end a pregnancy on their own do so because they have no other option. Some prefer self-care and turn to herbs and supplements to manage most of their health needs, and some women see self-induction as less invasive and more natural than a clinic-based abortion. Others are just looking for a simple solution to a problem that our society has stigmatized and made difficult to solve.

Medication abortion could change the way our society perceives self-induced abortion. This option for pregnancy termination is available in many US clinics at up to 10 weeks gestation and allows women to take medications at home, where their experience is very similar to a natural miscarriage.

The most effective regimen involves the use of mifepristone, also known as RU-486, followed by misoprostol. Taken together, these drugs are more than 95% effective at causing a complete abortion. Misoprostol can also be used alone, but the efficacy of this method is closer to 85%.

A new article I co-authored in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology turns the notion of self-abortion even further on its head by asking a simple question: do the drugs used in medication abortion meet the criteria of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for over-the-counter sale? The answer is a qualified yes, although more research is needed.

Of course, at the moment, the idea of over-the-counter access to medication abortion in the United States sounds crazy. Currently American women in most states – unlike women in many other countries – are unable to buy even birth control pills without a prescription.

But in the same way that women around the globe are getting contraceptives on their own, many are obtaining medication abortion over the counter at pharmacies. The limited data so far suggests women are doing this safely – and there is no question that use of these medications has contributed to a reduction in abortion-related mortality worldwide.

The FDA has standardized criteria to decide if a medication is appropriate for over-the-counter sale. For medication abortion, the most critical remaining step is determining whether women can assess on their own if the method is appropriate for them – in particular, whether they are less than 10 weeks pregnant. Studies have shown that women are quite accurate at dating their pregnancies if they know when their last menstrual period was. Of course, women could also get an ultrasound, which might be easier to obtain – and more likely to be covered by insurance if they have it – than a clinic-based abortion.

Beyond dating the pregnancy, women must only answer a few health-related questions to determine their eligibility. One or two blood tests may also be required, although their utility is debatable. The rest of the medication abortion process already takes place at home, and women are told to seek care if they have unusual symptoms, such as fever or heavy bleeding. Women can also assess on their own whether the abortion was complete.

While all of these preliminary data are encouraging, more research is needed to clearly document whether the FDA’s criteria are met. We also need to know how much demand there is for over-the-counter medication abortion. It may be that most US women would prefer to meet with a doctor or nurse practitioner before beginning the abortion process, and clearly clinic-based support must remain an option for women.

From a purely medical perspective, it no longer makes sense to demonize women’s safe use of abortion medications at home – just as the abortion rights movement should no longer rely on rhetoric around returning to the days of coat-hanger abortions.

It may be a long time before these drugs are on the shelf of your neighborhood pharmacy, but in the meantime, there are other ways to improve access to this technology and help women obtain abortion care earlier in pregnancy.

Research has already demonstrated the safety of nurse practitioners providing medication abortion, as well as the use of telemedicine to expand access to this option. While we wait for more data on over-the-counter medication abortion, the time has come to start loosening restrictions on this abortion method and to help give women the type of care they want.

3 Ways Every Mom Should Try to Better the Mental Health of Kids

It’s often noticed that kids don’t even cross adolescence but go into depression. You must be very worried as a mother, perplexed to figure out how can you care for mental health of kids so that they don’t develop any mental health disorder.

Here are 3 tips that you can follow to keep children healthy:

Encourage them to play board games:

As a mother you must be understanding how much pressure kids go through these days: Be it parental pressure or academic pressure or something else. You also find yourself helpless sometimes as you can’t compromise on kids’ education for their shining future, but you can always try to lessen their burden in some other way. Playing board games is a great way to lessen the stress of kids. Bring educational board games at home and start playing with them. They will have fun playing such innovative games. More they will enjoy the happiness of playing together, especially with parents. Your kids will be learning playfully without even their knowledge. If you are confused about which game to buy, let me get you the solution:

A brand new, interactive board game is going to be launched in market soon, which is designed with the purpose of developing STEM skills of children. This family-friendly tabletop game will take your kid on a journey to a tree squirrel’s world. The animal loving nature of an aerospace engineer, named Randy Hecht, inspired him to invent this game. He even wants to donate a certain percentage of proceed to local animal charities. This game will truly inculcate confidence and competitive spirit in your child as well as will improve their cognitive skills. It’s a fun game that will make your kids happy, hence will reduce their pressure and stress. Your kids will learn about squirrel behaviors. Moreover, the game will improve their verbal and communication skills as well as logical and reasoning skills. Children also will get the opportunity to practice math and negotiation skills through this educational game. Do you intend to support the creators of this board game? You can surely do so, theres a kickstarter campaign being created for you to go and pledge for the project and contribute for the noble cause. It’s not a bad idea because they’re giving back to the community in a positive way.

Make them Eat Healthy

You must be wondering what connection does our brain have with healthy eating. Let me give you a clear picture. Human body needs vitamins and nutrients in order to make the brain function. If you don’t feed your kids correctly, their brain will not function properly. It will affect their academic performance as well as mental health. So, don’t forget to give them energy drink, meat, fish, milk, vegetables, nuts, seeds etc.

Encourage them to do physical activity

Physical activity is very important for kids to keep their brain active. You should encourage them to practice yoga or play in parks. When your kids are physically active interacting with others, they will develop social skills and will learn how to deal with emotions. Physical activity will help them with healthy mental growth. As a mother, you must be the role model of your child. What can be better than if you accompany him in playground or yoga? Think about it.

Chloe Paltrow
Chloe Paltrow, MD, is a psychiatrist with more than 20 years of experience. She is also a researcher in the field of neurology. Dr. Paltrow sees patients with different neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities. She has shared her knowledge in various websites and blogs like Collective Evolution, PsychCentral and Pick The Brain. Currently, she is studying how brain injury and brain disorders can be treated with hyperbaric chamber, of which OxyHealth is a leading provider.