Tag Archives: study

Dementia risk to 50-year-olds with raised blood pressure – study

Fifty-year-olds with slightly raised blood pressure are at an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, a new study has suggested.

Study participants had a greater risk even if they did not have other heart-related problems, the research published in the European Heart Journal said.

The association between blood pressure and dementia risk was seen at aged 50, but not 60 or 70, the study found.

People aged 50 with a systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg, which is between the ideal blood pressure range (90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg) and that considered to be high (140/90mmHg), or above had a 45% greater risk of developing dementia, scientists said.

Those taking part in the study developed dementia at an average age of 75.

Dr Jessica Abell, paper author and a research associate in dementia and epidemiology at University College London, said the study looks in more detail at what is considered “midlife”.

She said: “Previous research has not been able to test the link between raised blood pressure and dementia directly by examining the timing in sufficient detail.

“In our paper we were able to examine the association at age 50, 60 and 70, and we found different patterns of association. This will have important implications for policy guidelines, which currently only use the generic term ‘midlife’.”

Prof Archana Singh-Manoux, honorary professor at UCL, led the research and said: “Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia, as suggested by previous research. It also suggests that at age 50, the risk of dementia may be increased in people who have raised levels of systolic blood pressure below the threshold commonly used to treat hypertension.”

Researchers suggested a possible reason for the link could be resulting damage from silent or mini-strokes, which often have unnoticed symptoms and are linked to high blood pressure.

Dr Abell noted that the findings were from “observational, population-level research” and therefore “do not translate directly into implications for individual patients”.

The research analysed 8,639 people, part of the long-running Whitehall II study of more than 10,000 civil servants tracked since 1985.

Dementia risk to 50-year-olds with raised blood pressure – study

Fifty-year-olds with slightly raised blood pressure are at an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, a new study has suggested.

Study participants had a greater risk even if they did not have other heart-related problems, the research published in the European Heart Journal said.

The association between blood pressure and dementia risk was seen at aged 50, but not 60 or 70, the study found.

People aged 50 with a systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg, which is between the ideal blood pressure range (90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg) and that considered to be high (140/90mmHg), or above had a 45% greater risk of developing dementia, scientists said.

Those taking part in the study developed dementia at an average age of 75.

Dr Jessica Abell, paper author and a research associate in dementia and epidemiology at University College London, said the study looks in more detail at what is considered “midlife”.

She said: “Previous research has not been able to test the link between raised blood pressure and dementia directly by examining the timing in sufficient detail.

“In our paper we were able to examine the association at age 50, 60 and 70, and we found different patterns of association. This will have important implications for policy guidelines, which currently only use the generic term ‘midlife’.”

Prof Archana Singh-Manoux, honorary professor at UCL, led the research and said: “Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia, as suggested by previous research. It also suggests that at age 50, the risk of dementia may be increased in people who have raised levels of systolic blood pressure below the threshold commonly used to treat hypertension.”

Researchers suggested a possible reason for the link could be resulting damage from silent or mini-strokes, which often have unnoticed symptoms and are linked to high blood pressure.

Dr Abell noted that the findings were from “observational, population-level research” and therefore “do not translate directly into implications for individual patients”.

The research analysed 8,639 people, part of the long-running Whitehall II study of more than 10,000 civil servants tracked since 1985.

Dementia risk to 50-year-olds with raised blood pressure – study

Fifty-year-olds with slightly raised blood pressure are at an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, a new study has suggested.

Study participants had a greater risk even if they did not have other heart-related problems, the research published in the European Heart Journal said.

The association between blood pressure and dementia risk was seen at aged 50, but not 60 or 70, the study found.

People aged 50 with a systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg, which is between the ideal blood pressure range (90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg) and that considered to be high (140/90mmHg), or above had a 45% greater risk of developing dementia, scientists said.

Those taking part in the study developed dementia at an average age of 75.

Dr Jessica Abell, paper author and a research associate in dementia and epidemiology at University College London, said they study looks in more detail at what is considered “midlife”.

She said: “Previous research has not been able to test the link between raised blood pressure and dementia directly by examining the timing in sufficient detail.

“In our paper we were able to examine the association at age 50, 60 and 70, and we found different patterns of association. This will have important implications for policy guidelines, which currently only use the generic term ‘midlife’.”

Prof Archana Singh-Manoux, honorary professor at UCL, led the research and said: “Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia, as suggested by previous research. It also suggests that at age 50, the risk of dementia may be increased in people who have raised levels of systolic blood pressure below the threshold commonly used to treat hypertension.”

Researchers suggested a possible reason for the link could be resulting damage from silent or mini-strokes, which often have unnoticed symptoms and are linked to high blood pressure.

Dr Abell noted that the findings were from “observational, population-level research” and therefore “do not translate directly into implications for individual patients”.

The research analysed 8,639 people, part of the long-running Whitehall II study of more than 10,000 civil servants tracked since 1985.

Ageism widespread in UK, study finds

Ageism is rife in Britain, with millennials holding the most negative attitudes towards ageing, according to a study.

A quarter of millennials believe it is normal for older people to be unhappy and depressed, while 40% believe there is no way to escape dementia as you get older, research from the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) shows.

Across all age groups, almost a third of people surveyed agreed with the statement “being lonely is just something that happens when people get old”, while two-thirds said they had no friends with an age gap of 30 years or more.

“Ageist attitudes abound in society and have a major impact on the public’s health, and yet they are rarely treated with the seriousness they deserve,” said the RSPH chief executive, Shirley Cramer.

“Too often ageist behaviour and language is trivialised, overlooked or even served up as the punchline to a joke – something we would rightly not tolerate with other forms of prejudice.”

The study also found that half of women and a quarter of men said they felt pressure to stay looking young.

The society called for a ban on use of the term “anti-ageing” in the cosmetics and beauty industry. “If we can begin to remove the stubborn barriers that reinforce societal ageism, we can expect many more to look forward to later life as a period of opportunity for growth and new experiences, rather than a set of mental and physical challenges,” Cramer said.

In partnership with the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, the study surveyed ageist attitudes across 12 areas of life, revealing that the public are most ageist about appearance, memory loss and participation in physical and community activities.

Not all the findings were negative. More than two-thirds of the public (69%) agreed that “fundamentally, older people are no different from people of other ages”. The report also exposes stark differences in attitudes among people from different backgrounds: those from a black ethnic background had an attitude to ageing nearly three times more positive than the average.

According to the RSPH, negative attitudes about ageing can become “a self-fulfilling prophecy”, with previous research showing that those with such attitudes live seven and a half years less on average, experience increased memory loss, have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, a reduced ability to recover from illness, less interest in diet and exercise and a more negative body image.

The RSPH called for the Independent Press Standards Organisation to include age in the editors’ code of practice to prevent discrimination.

“[T]he common media portrayal of older people blocking beds could be framed instead as ‘older people trapped in hospital because they can’t afford the care they need when they go home’,” states the report, About That Age Old Question, for which 2,000 adults in the UK were surveyed.

“[W]e need realistic portrayals of ageing that overall reflect both the challenges and opportunities in later life.”

The report recommends housing nurseries and care homes under the same roof. “Intergenerational contact and care offer huge benefits for the groups involved, but also to the facilities’ operators,” it says, adding that it could be an opportunity for local authorities and private providers to save costs “as well as offering genuine wellbeing benefits to ‘young’ and ‘old’ customers alike”.

Ageism widespread in UK, study finds

Ageism is rife in Britain, with millennials holding the most negative attitudes towards ageing, according to a study.

A quarter of millennials believe it is normal for older people to be unhappy and depressed, while 40% believe there is no way to escape dementia as you get older, research from the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) shows.

Across all age groups, almost a third of people surveyed agreed with the statement “being lonely is just something that happens when people get old”, while two-thirds said they had no friends with an age gap of 30 years or more.

“Ageist attitudes abound in society and have a major impact on the public’s health, and yet they are rarely treated with the seriousness they deserve,” said the RSPH chief executive, Shirley Cramer.

“Too often ageist behaviour and language is trivialised, overlooked or even served up as the punchline to a joke – something we would rightly not tolerate with other forms of prejudice.”

The study also found that half of women and a quarter of men said they felt pressure to stay looking young.

The society called for a ban on use of the term “anti-ageing” in the cosmetics and beauty industry. “If we can begin to remove the stubborn barriers that reinforce societal ageism, we can expect many more to look forward to later life as a period of opportunity for growth and new experiences, rather than a set of mental and physical challenges,” Cramer said.

In partnership with the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, the study surveyed ageist attitudes across 12 areas of life, revealing that the public are most ageist about appearance, memory loss and participation in physical and community activities.

Not all the findings were negative. More than two-thirds of the public (69%) agreed that “fundamentally, older people are no different from people of other ages”. The report also exposes stark differences in attitudes among people from different backgrounds: those from a black ethnic background had an attitude to ageing nearly three times more positive than the average.

According to the RSPH, negative attitudes about ageing can become “a self-fulfilling prophecy”, with previous research showing that those with such attitudes live seven and a half years less on average, experience increased memory loss, have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, a reduced ability to recover from illness, less interest in diet and exercise and a more negative body image.

The RSPH called for the Independent Press Standards Organisation to include age in the editors’ code of practice to prevent discrimination.

“[T]he common media portrayal of older people blocking beds could be framed instead as ‘older people trapped in hospital because they can’t afford the care they need when they go home’,” states the report, About That Age Old Question, for which 2,000 adults in the UK were surveyed.

“[W]e need realistic portrayals of ageing that overall reflect both the challenges and opportunities in later life.”

The report recommends housing nurseries and care homes under the same roof. “Intergenerational contact and care offer huge benefits for the groups involved, but also to the facilities’ operators,” it says, adding that it could be an opportunity for local authorities and private providers to save costs “as well as offering genuine wellbeing benefits to ‘young’ and ‘old’ customers alike”.

Ageism widespread in UK, study finds

Ageism is rife in Britain, with millennials holding the most negative attitudes towards ageing, according to a study.

A quarter of millennials believe it is normal for older people to be unhappy and depressed, while 40% believe there is no way to escape dementia as you get older, research from the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) shows.

Across all age groups, almost a third of people surveyed agreed with the statement “being lonely is just something that happens when people get old”, while two-thirds said they had no friends with an age gap of 30 years or more.

“Ageist attitudes abound in society and have a major impact on the public’s health, and yet they are rarely treated with the seriousness they deserve,” said the RSPH chief executive, Shirley Cramer.

“Too often ageist behaviour and language is trivialised, overlooked or even served up as the punchline to a joke – something we would rightly not tolerate with other forms of prejudice.”

The study also found that half of women and a quarter of men said they felt pressure to stay looking young.

The society called for a ban on use of the term “anti-ageing” in the cosmetics and beauty industry. “If we can begin to remove the stubborn barriers that reinforce societal ageism, we can expect many more to look forward to later life as a period of opportunity for growth and new experiences, rather than a set of mental and physical challenges,” Cramer said.

In partnership with the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, the study surveyed ageist attitudes across 12 areas of life, revealing that the public are most ageist about appearance, memory loss and participation in physical and community activities.

Not all the findings were negative. More than two-thirds of the public (69%) agreed that “fundamentally, older people are no different from people of other ages”. The report also exposes stark differences in attitudes among people from different backgrounds: those from a black ethnic background had an attitude to ageing nearly three times more positive than the average.

According to the RSPH, negative attitudes about ageing can become “a self-fulfilling prophecy”, with previous research showing that those with such attitudes live seven and a half years less on average, experience increased memory loss, have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, a reduced ability to recover from illness, less interest in diet and exercise and a more negative body image.

The RSPH called for the Independent Press Standards Organisation to include age in the editors’ code of practice to prevent discrimination.

“[T]he common media portrayal of older people blocking beds could be framed instead as ‘older people trapped in hospital because they can’t afford the care they need when they go home’,” states the report, About That Age Old Question, for which 2,000 adults in the UK were surveyed.

“[W]e need realistic portrayals of ageing that overall reflect both the challenges and opportunities in later life.”

The report recommends housing nurseries and care homes under the same roof. “Intergenerational contact and care offer huge benefits for the groups involved, but also to the facilities’ operators,” it says, adding that it could be an opportunity for local authorities and private providers to save costs “as well as offering genuine wellbeing benefits to ‘young’ and ‘old’ customers alike”.

Ageism widespread in UK, study finds

Ageism is rife in Britain, with millennials holding the most negative attitudes to ageing, according to a study.

A quarter of millennials believe it is normal for older people to be unhappy and depressed, while 40% believe there is no way to escape dementia as you get older, research from the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) shows.

Across all age groups, almost a third of people surveyed agreed with the statement “being lonely is just something that happens when people get old”, while two thirds had no friends with an age gap of 30 years or more.

“Ageist attitudes abound in society and have a major impact on the public’s health, and yet they are rarely treated with the seriousness they deserve,” the RSPH chief executive, Shirley Cramer, said.

“Too often ageist behaviour and language is trivialised, overlooked, or even served up as the punchline to a joke – something we would rightly not tolerate with other forms of prejudice.”

The study also found that half of women and a quarter of men say they feel pressure to stay looking young.

The society called for a ban on the use of the term “anti-ageing” in the cosmetics and beauty industry. “If we can begin to remove the stubborn barriers that reinforce societal ageism, we can expect many more to look forward to later life as a period of opportunity for growth and new experiences, rather than a set of mental and physical challenges,” Cramer said.

In partnership with the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, the study surveyed ageist attitudes across 12 areas of life, revealing that the public are most ageist about appearance, memory loss and participation in physical and community activities.

Not all the findings were negative. More than two thirds of the public (69%) agreed that “fundamentally, older people are no different from people of other ages”. The report also exposed stark differences in attitudes between people from different backgrounds: those from a black ethnic background had an attitude to ageing nearly three times more positive than the average.

According to the RSPH, negative attitudes about ageing can become “a self-fulfilling prophecy”, with previous research showing that those with such attitudes live seven and a half years less on average, experience increased memory loss, have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, a reduced ability to recover from illness, less interest in diet and exercise, and a more negative body image.

The RSPH also called for the Independent Press Standards Organisation to include age in the editors’ code of practice to prevent discrimination.

“[T]he common media portrayal of older people blocking beds could be framed instead as ‘older people trapped in hospital because they can’t afford the care they need when they go home’, states the report, About That Age Old Question, which surveyed 2,000 adults in the UK.

“[W]e need realistic portrayals of ageing that overall reflect both the challenges and opportunities in later life.”

The report recommends housing nurseries and care homes under the same roof.

“Intergenerational contact and care offer huge benefits for the groups involved, but also to the facilities operators,” it says, adding that it was an opportunity for local authorities and private providers to save costs “as well as offering genuine wellbeing benefits to ‘young’ and ‘old’ customers alike”.

Premature birth risk could be measured by blood test – study

Whether a pregnant woman is at risk of premature delivery could eventually be predicted by a blood test, according to new research.

The study found that both the age of a developing foetus, and whether a woman was at risk of giving birth early, could be worked out using a test that picks up free-floating RNA, DNA’s single-stranded cousin, in the mother’s blood.

Although researchers behind the study warn that the research is based on only a small number of participants, and has not yet been used in clinical trials, the findings offer hopebecause current tests to identify a risk of preterm birth are invasive and expensive.

The study, published in the journal Science, reveals how blood samples taken weekly from 31 women during their pregnancy were used to create, train and check, a model which allowed the team to estimate the age of the foetus based on nine different free-floating RNAs.

Using blood samples taken in both the second and third trimesters, the model predicted the correct gestational age to within 14 days 45% of the time. By contrast ultrasound imaging carried out in the first trimester of pregnancy was similarly correct 48% of the time for the 31 women.

At present gestational age is generally predicted using the expensive technique of ultrasound imaging, which becomes less accurate after the first trimester, and a woman’s knowledge of her last period – which can be inaccurate.

The team created a further test, involving seven free-floating RNAs, based on data from blood samples from another small group of pregnant women, all of whom were at high risk of premature delivery. When applied to another 23 such women using blood samples taken up to two months before delivery, the test accurately identified four out of five women who had gone on to spontaneously give birth early but mistakenly flagged 17% of those who actually delivered at full term.

“To really get to the final results, and before we actually apply a test that we put into production, we need to do a larger study,” said Dr Mads Melbye, a co-author of the research from Stanford University and the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen. He also noted it could be several years before the test, if confirmed, becomes available.

Professor Andrew Shennan, Tommy’s clinical director of the pre-term surveillance clinic at Guys and St Thomas’ Hospital, agreed further work was crucial, but said the initial results are promising. “Obviously the numbers [of participants] are very small but the results are very impressive,” he said.

Shennan added the ability to work out gestational age from a blood test could be particularly useful in developing countries, where access to ultrasound is limited, to help time deliveries while keeping both mother and baby safe. “Because the way to save lives is often to deliver babies and mothers early, this becomes critical,” he said.

Premature birth risk could be measured by blood test – study

Whether a pregnant woman is at risk of premature delivery could eventually be predicted by a blood test, according to new research.

The study found that both the age of a developing foetus, and whether a woman was at risk of giving birth early, could be worked out using a test that picks up free-floating RNA, DNA’s single-stranded cousin, in the mother’s blood.

Although researchers behind the study warn that the research is based on only a small number of participants, and has not yet been used in clinical trials, the findings offer hopebecause current tests to identify a risk of preterm birth are invasive and expensive.

The study, published in the journal Science, reveals how blood samples taken weekly from 31 women during their pregnancy were used to create, train and check, a model which allowed the team to estimate the age of the foetus based on nine different free-floating RNAs.

Using blood samples taken in both the second and third trimesters, the model predicted the correct gestational age to within 14 days 45% of the time. By contrast ultrasound imaging carried out in the first trimester of pregnancy was similarly correct 48% of the time for the 31 women.

At present gestational age is generally predicted using the expensive technique of ultrasound imaging, which becomes less accurate after the first trimester, and a woman’s knowledge of her last period – which can be inaccurate.

The team created a further test, involving seven free-floating RNAs, based on data from blood samples from another small group of pregnant women, all of whom were at high risk of premature delivery. When applied to another 23 such women using blood samples taken up to two months before delivery, the test accurately identified four out of five women who had gone on to spontaneously give birth early but mistakenly flagged 17% of those who actually delivered at full term.

“To really get to the final results, and before we actually apply a test that we put into production, we need to do a larger study,” said Dr Mads Melbye, a co-author of the research from Stanford University and the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen. He also noted it could be several years before the test, if confirmed, becomes available.

Professor Andrew Shennan, Tommy’s clinical director of the pre-term surveillance clinic at Guys and St Thomas’ Hospital, agreed further work was crucial, but said the initial results are promising. “Obviously the numbers [of participants] are very small but the results are very impressive,” he said.

Shennan added the ability to work out gestational age from a blood test could be particularly useful in developing countries, where access to ultrasound is limited, to help time deliveries while keeping both mother and baby safe. “Because the way to save lives is often to deliver babies and mothers early, this becomes critical,” he said.

Premature birth risk could be measured by blood test – study

Whether a pregnant woman is at risk of premature delivery could eventually be predicted by a blood test, according to new research.

The study found that both the age of a developing foetus, and whether a woman was at risk of giving birth early, could be worked out using a test that picks up free-floating RNA, DNA’s single-stranded cousin, in the mother’s blood.

Although researchers behind the study warn that the research is based on only a small number of participants, and has not yet been used in clinical trials, the findings offer hopebecause current tests to identify a risk of preterm birth are invasive and expensive.

The study, published in the journal Science, reveals how blood samples taken weekly from 31 women during their pregnancy were used to create, train and check, a model which allowed the team to estimate the age of the foetus based on nine different free-floating RNAs.

Using blood samples taken in both the second and third trimesters, the model predicted the correct gestational age to within 14 days 45% of the time. By contrast ultrasound imaging carried out in the first trimester of pregnancy was similarly correct 48% of the time for the 31 women.

At present gestational age is generally predicted using the expensive technique of ultrasound imaging, which becomes less accurate after the first trimester, and a woman’s knowledge of her last period – which can be inaccurate.

The team created a further test, involving seven free-floating RNAs, based on data from blood samples from another small group of pregnant women, all of whom were at high risk of premature delivery. When applied to another 23 such women using blood samples taken up to two months before delivery, the test accurately identified four out of five women who had gone on to spontaneously give birth early but mistakenly flagged 17% of those who actually delivered at full term.

“To really get to the final results, and before we actually apply a test that we put into production, we need to do a larger study,” said Dr Mads Melbye, a co-author of the research from Stanford University and the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen. He also noted it could be several years before the test, if confirmed, becomes available.

Professor Andrew Shennan, Tommy’s clinical director of the pre-term surveillance clinic at Guys and St Thomas’ Hospital, agreed further work was crucial, but said the initial results are promising. “Obviously the numbers [of participants] are very small but the results are very impressive,” he said.

Shennan added the ability to work out gestational age from a blood test could be particularly useful in developing countries, where access to ultrasound is limited, to help time deliveries while keeping both mother and baby safe. “Because the way to save lives is often to deliver babies and mothers early, this becomes critical,” he said.