Tag Archives: tackle

Sadiq Khan must do more to tackle London’s air pollution, say health experts

London mayor Sadiq Khan has been urged to do more to tackle the capital’s air pollution crisis by leading health experts and academics.

In a new report published on Tuesday, the group, including the chair of the NHS Sir Malcolm Grant, said the mayor must go further to reduce car use across the capital and harness new technology to create a system based around “public transport, walking and cycling”.

The findings come amid mounting evidence of the health threat posed by the UK’s air pollution crisis. Last week it emerged that as well as illegal levels of NO2 pollution, every person in the capital is breathing air that exceeds global guidelines for dangerous PM2.5 particles.

The scale of the situation was highlighted this week when MPs from four Commons committees decided to relaunch their “super inquiry” into the UK’s toxic air, warning that the health implications were increasingly serious.

Launching the inquiry, Lilian Greenwood MP, chair of the transport select committee, said: “Real change is possible if government leads from the front to coordinate an effective response to one of the biggest issues of our time.”

Khan has set out a range of plans to tackle pollution from diesel cars in the capital. The first stage, the new T-Charge, which will charge older, more polluting vehicles entering central London, starts later this month.

Next year, the roll-out of the Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) begins, which will impose an additional charge on the most polluting vehicles.

But the report, titled the Commission on the Future of London’s Roads and Streets, commissioned by the Centre for London thinktank, said he must go further.

It suggests the low emissions zone should be used to identify the dirtiest vehicles and offer them “mobility tokens” to spend on public transport or other green alternatives in exchange for taking their vehicles off the road.

It also suggests:

  • Ending subsidised residential parking permits and introducing incentives, including public transport credits, for residents to give up their existing permits
  • Extending payment systems such as the Oyster card to include new greener services such as car clubs, cycle hire, taxis and cabs
  • Replacing the existing congestion charge with a pan-London, pre-pay smart road user pricing scheme, which reflects the environmental impacts of journeys

Green groups and clean air campaigners have welcomed the mayor’s plans on air pollution but agree he must go further.

Rosie Rogers, Greenpeace UK’s senior clean air campaigner, said the report was “absolutely right to call on the London mayor to be bold in reshaping the capital’s transport system”.

“Tackling the air pollution crisis that’s threatening the health of so many Londoners, especially children, will require a far-reaching and ambitious strategy,” she said, adding that the mayor had “already taken some welcome steps … but much more needs to be done”.

“With diesel being a major contributor to illegal air pollution, Sadiq Khan’s plan will need to include tough action on all diesel cars, old and new, if it is to succeed.”

ClientEarth spokesperson Simon Alcock said: “The mayor has shown leadership on air quality since he came to office, with the proposed extension of the ULEZ, for example, but he can and should go much further.

“There is a whole range of technologies that can be used to help people move to cleaner transport and reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets. The UK government, which has failed to tackle illegal pollution levels all over the UK, should be working with the mayor to speed up these policies – not holding him back.”

The Green party has accused Khan of compromising his air quality plans by pushing ahead with proposals for the Silvertown Tunnel, a proposed huge new urban motorway in east London.

Caroline Russell, Green party member of the London Assembly, said that while Khan’s “vision for healthy streets” was “really encouraging” it was undermined by proposals for the new road tunnel.

“By inexplicably pushing for a giant road tunnel that would swamp what is already one of the most polluted parts of the capital with even more cars, he threatens to undermine his promising vision for more walking and cycling.”

World Rugby criticises call for scrum and tackle ban in school sport

World Rugby has criticised the claims in a study calling for tackling and scrums to be banned in school sport.

Allyson Pollock and Graham Kirkwood from the Institute of Health at Newcastle University argued in the British Medical Journal that most injuries in youth rugby occur due to the collision elements of the game.

The pair called for “harmful contact” to be prohibited on school playing fields. Removing collision from school rugby is likely to “reduce and mitigate the risk of injury” in pupils, they said.

However, in a statement, the sport’s governing body questioned the data on which the claims were based.

“World Rugby and its member unions take player safety very seriously and proactively pursue an evidence-based approach to reduce the risk of injury at all levels,” the statement said.

“These claims are not based on like-for-like injury statistics and the conclusions are not supported by the available data.

“It is well documented that, for most sports, injury rates increase with age, but the quoted research mixes 9-12 with 18-20 age groups.

“Indeed, within the published studies where injury has been properly defined and monitored, suggest the risk for pre-teens is not unacceptably high compared to other popular sports.”

Pollock and Kirkwood called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game.

In 2016, the nation’s most senior medics rejected a call for a ban on tackling in youth rugby.

But Pollock, who has been researching injuries and rugby injuries for more than 10 years, and senior research associate Kirkwood said that under United Nations conventions, governments have a “duty to protect children from risks of injury”.

“We call on the chief medical officers to act on the evidence and advise the UK government to put the interests of the child before those of corporate professional rugby unions and remove harmful contact from the school game,” they wrote.

“Most injures in youth rugby are because of the collision elements of the game, mainly the tackle.

“In March 2016, scientists and doctors from the Sport Collision Injury Collective called for the tackle and other forms of harmful contact to be removed from school rugby. The data in support of the call is compelling.”

That call was rejected by a range of former players and officials working within the game as well as World Rugby, however.

Nigel Owens MBE (@Nigelrefowens)

They will want to ban walking to school next. And only rubber pens and pencils to be used in class. What is the world coming too. https://t.co/CYMmk6WSgt

September 26, 2017

Dr Willie Stewart, a consultant neuropathologist who has been working in the field of brain injury for more than 15 years and sits on World Rugby’s Concussion Advisory Body, tweeted: “The health crisis facing Britain’s children is not #concussion but obesity and lack of exercise.”

Peter Robinson, the father of Ben Robinson, who died at 14 from second impact syndrome following a school game, and who worked with Stewart in helping to inspire a change in concussion guidelines, added on Twitter: “Banning tackling at schools not the answer. Mismanagement of Concussion is the greatest risk in the game.”

Citing previous research into sports injuries in youngsters, Pollock and Kirkwood had argued in the article that rugby, along with ice hockey and American football, have the highest concussion rates.

They said that rule changes in collision sports can make a difference, highlighting the Canadian ban on “body checking” – where a player deliberately makes contact with an opposing player – in ice hockey for under 13 year olds.

Meanwhile, in the UK “teacher training in the skills of rugby are lacking, as is concussion awareness training,” the pair wrote.

The researchers called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game. They pointed to a history of concussion being associated with the “lowering of a person’s life chances” across a number of measures including low educational achievement and premature death. Meanwhile, a head injury is linked to an increased risk of dementia.

Commenting on the article, Prof Tara Spires-Jones, UK Dementia Research Institute programme lead and deputy director of the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Very strong, reproducible evidence supports a greater risk of dementia in people who have head injuries in their lifetimes, which urges caution in games where there is a significant risk of head injury.

“However, the data on specifically whether playing rugby or other contact sports in school increases your risk of dementia are not as robust yet due to a lack of large prospective studies. It is also very clear that there are many health risks of leading a sedentary lifestyle.”

World Rugby criticises call for scrum and tackle ban in school sport

World Rugby has criticised the claims in a study calling for tackling and scrums to be banned in school sport.

Allyson Pollock and Graham Kirkwood from the Institute of Health at Newcastle University argued in the British Medical Journal that most injuries in youth rugby occur due to the collision elements of the game.

The pair called for “harmful contact” to be prohibited on school playing fields. Removing collision from school rugby is likely to “reduce and mitigate the risk of injury” in pupils, they said.

However, in a statement, the sport’s governing body questioned the data on which the claims were based.

“World Rugby and its member unions take player safety very seriously and proactively pursue an evidence-based approach to reduce the risk of injury at all levels,” the statement said.

“These claims are not based on like-for-like injury statistics and the conclusions are not supported by the available data.

“It is well documented that, for most sports, injury rates increase with age, but the quoted research mixes 9-12 with 18-20 age groups.

“Indeed, within the published studies where injury has been properly defined and monitored, suggest the risk for pre-teens is not unacceptably high compared to other popular sports.”

Pollock and Kirkwood called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game.

In 2016, the nation’s most senior medics rejected a call for a ban on tackling in youth rugby.

But Pollock, who has been researching injuries and rugby injuries for more than 10 years, and senior research associate Kirkwood said that under United Nations conventions, governments have a “duty to protect children from risks of injury”.

“We call on the chief medical officers to act on the evidence and advise the UK government to put the interests of the child before those of corporate professional rugby unions and remove harmful contact from the school game,” they wrote.

“Most injures in youth rugby are because of the collision elements of the game, mainly the tackle.

“In March 2016, scientists and doctors from the Sport Collision Injury Collective called for the tackle and other forms of harmful contact to be removed from school rugby. The data in support of the call is compelling.”

That call was rejected by a range of former players and officials working within the game as well as World Rugby, however.

Nigel Owens MBE (@Nigelrefowens)

They will want to ban walking to school next. And only rubber pens and pencils to be used in class. What is the world coming too. https://t.co/CYMmk6WSgt

September 26, 2017

Dr Willie Stewart, a consultant neuropathologist who has been working in the field of brain injury for more than 15 years and sits on World Rugby’s Concussion Advisory Body, tweeted: “The health crisis facing Britain’s children is not #concussion but obesity and lack of exercise.”

Peter Robinson, the father of Ben Robinson, who died at 14 from second impact syndrome following a school game, and who worked with Stewart in helping to inspire a change in concussion guidelines, added on Twitter: “Banning tackling at schools not the answer. Mismanagement of Concussion is the greatest risk in the game.”

Citing previous research into sports injuries in youngsters, Pollock and Kirkwood had argued in the article that rugby, along with ice hockey and American football, have the highest concussion rates.

They said that rule changes in collision sports can make a difference, highlighting the Canadian ban on “body checking” – where a player deliberately makes contact with an opposing player – in ice hockey for under 13 year olds.

Meanwhile, in the UK “teacher training in the skills of rugby are lacking, as is concussion awareness training,” the pair wrote.

The researchers called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game. They pointed to a history of concussion being associated with the “lowering of a person’s life chances” across a number of measures including low educational achievement and premature death. Meanwhile, a head injury is linked to an increased risk of dementia.

Commenting on the article, Prof Tara Spires-Jones, UK Dementia Research Institute programme lead and deputy director of the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Very strong, reproducible evidence supports a greater risk of dementia in people who have head injuries in their lifetimes, which urges caution in games where there is a significant risk of head injury.

“However, the data on specifically whether playing rugby or other contact sports in school increases your risk of dementia are not as robust yet due to a lack of large prospective studies. It is also very clear that there are many health risks of leading a sedentary lifestyle.”

World Rugby criticises call for scrum and tackle ban in school sport

World Rugby has criticised the claims in a study calling for tackling and scrums to be banned in school sport.

Allyson Pollock and Graham Kirkwood from the Institute of Health at Newcastle University argued in the British Medical Journal that most injuries in youth rugby occur due to the collision elements of the game.

The pair called for “harmful contact” to be prohibited on school playing fields. Removing collision from school rugby is likely to “reduce and mitigate the risk of injury” in pupils, they said.

However, in a statement, the sport’s governing body questioned the data on which the claims were based.

“World Rugby and its member unions take player safety very seriously and proactively pursue an evidence-based approach to reduce the risk of injury at all levels,” the statement said.

“These claims are not based on like-for-like injury statistics and the conclusions are not supported by the available data.

“It is well documented that, for most sports, injury rates increase with age, but the quoted research mixes 9-12 with 18-20 age groups.

“Indeed, within the published studies where injury has been properly defined and monitored, suggest the risk for pre-teens is not unacceptably high compared to other popular sports.”

Pollock and Kirkwood called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game.

In 2016, the nation’s most senior medics rejected a call for a ban on tackling in youth rugby.

But Pollock, who has been researching injuries and rugby injuries for more than 10 years, and senior research associate Kirkwood said that under United Nations conventions, governments have a “duty to protect children from risks of injury”.

“We call on the chief medical officers to act on the evidence and advise the UK government to put the interests of the child before those of corporate professional rugby unions and remove harmful contact from the school game,” they wrote.

“Most injures in youth rugby are because of the collision elements of the game, mainly the tackle.

“In March 2016, scientists and doctors from the Sport Collision Injury Collective called for the tackle and other forms of harmful contact to be removed from school rugby. The data in support of the call is compelling.”

That call was rejected by a range of former players and officials working within the game as well as World Rugby, however.

Nigel Owens MBE (@Nigelrefowens)

They will want to ban walking to school next. And only rubber pens and pencils to be used in class. What is the world coming too. https://t.co/CYMmk6WSgt

September 26, 2017

Dr Willie Stewart, a consultant neuropathologist who has been working in the field of brain injury for more than 15 years and sits on World Rugby’s Concussion Advisory Body, tweeted: “The health crisis facing Britain’s children is not #concussion but obesity and lack of exercise.”

Peter Robinson, the father of Ben Robinson, who died at 14 from second impact syndrome following a school game, and who worked with Stewart in helping to inspire a change in concussion guidelines, added on Twitter: “Banning tackling at schools not the answer. Mismanagement of Concussion is the greatest risk in the game.”

Citing previous research into sports injuries in youngsters, Pollock and Kirkwood had argued in the article that rugby, along with ice hockey and American football, have the highest concussion rates.

They said that rule changes in collision sports can make a difference, highlighting the Canadian ban on “body checking” – where a player deliberately makes contact with an opposing player – in ice hockey for under 13 year olds.

Meanwhile, in the UK “teacher training in the skills of rugby are lacking, as is concussion awareness training,” the pair wrote.

The researchers called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game. They pointed to a history of concussion being associated with the “lowering of a person’s life chances” across a number of measures including low educational achievement and premature death. Meanwhile, a head injury is linked to an increased risk of dementia.

Commenting on the article, Prof Tara Spires-Jones, UK Dementia Research Institute programme lead and deputy director of the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Very strong, reproducible evidence supports a greater risk of dementia in people who have head injuries in their lifetimes, which urges caution in games where there is a significant risk of head injury.

“However, the data on specifically whether playing rugby or other contact sports in school increases your risk of dementia are not as robust yet due to a lack of large prospective studies. It is also very clear that there are many health risks of leading a sedentary lifestyle.”

World Rugby criticises call for scrum and tackle ban in school sport

World Rugby has criticised the claims in a study calling for tackling and scrums to be banned in school sport.

Allyson Pollock and Graham Kirkwood from the Institute of Health at Newcastle University argued in the British Medical Journal that most injuries in youth rugby occur due to the collision elements of the game.

The pair called for “harmful contact” to be prohibited on school playing fields. Removing collision from school rugby is likely to “reduce and mitigate the risk of injury” in pupils, they said.

However, in a statement, the sport’s governing body questioned the data on which the claims were based.

“World Rugby and its member unions take player safety very seriously and proactively pursue an evidence-based approach to reduce the risk of injury at all levels,” the statement said.

“These claims are not based on like-for-like injury statistics and the conclusions are not supported by the available data.

“It is well documented that, for most sports, injury rates increase with age, but the quoted research mixes 9-12 with 18-20 age groups.

“Indeed, within the published studies where injury has been properly defined and monitored, suggest the risk for pre-teens is not unacceptably high compared to other popular sports.”

Pollock and Kirkwood called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game.

In 2016, the nation’s most senior medics rejected a call for a ban on tackling in youth rugby.

But Pollock, who has been researching injuries and rugby injuries for more than 10 years, and senior research associate Kirkwood said that under United Nations conventions, governments have a “duty to protect children from risks of injury”.

“We call on the chief medical officers to act on the evidence and advise the UK government to put the interests of the child before those of corporate professional rugby unions and remove harmful contact from the school game,” they wrote.

“Most injures in youth rugby are because of the collision elements of the game, mainly the tackle.

“In March 2016, scientists and doctors from the Sport Collision Injury Collective called for the tackle and other forms of harmful contact to be removed from school rugby. The data in support of the call is compelling.”

That call was rejected by a range of former players and officials working within the game as well as World Rugby, however.

Nigel Owens MBE (@Nigelrefowens)

They will want to ban walking to school next. And only rubber pens and pencils to be used in class. What is the world coming too. https://t.co/CYMmk6WSgt

September 26, 2017

Dr Willie Stewart, a consultant neuropathologist who has been working in the field of brain injury for more than 15 years and sits on World Rugby’s Concussion Advisory Body, tweeted: “The health crisis facing Britain’s children is not #concussion but obesity and lack of exercise.”

Peter Robinson, the father of Ben Robinson, who died at 14 from second impact syndrome following a school game, and who worked with Stewart in helping to inspire a change in concussion guidelines, added on Twitter: “Banning tackling at schools not the answer. Mismanagement of Concussion is the greatest risk in the game.”

Citing previous research into sports injuries in youngsters, Pollock and Kirkwood had argued in the article that rugby, along with ice hockey and American football, have the highest concussion rates.

They said that rule changes in collision sports can make a difference, highlighting the Canadian ban on “body checking” – where a player deliberately makes contact with an opposing player – in ice hockey for under 13 year olds.

Meanwhile, in the UK “teacher training in the skills of rugby are lacking, as is concussion awareness training,” the pair wrote.

The researchers called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game. They pointed to a history of concussion being associated with the “lowering of a person’s life chances” across a number of measures including low educational achievement and premature death. Meanwhile, a head injury is linked to an increased risk of dementia.

Commenting on the article, Prof Tara Spires-Jones, UK Dementia Research Institute programme lead and deputy director of the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Very strong, reproducible evidence supports a greater risk of dementia in people who have head injuries in their lifetimes, which urges caution in games where there is a significant risk of head injury.

“However, the data on specifically whether playing rugby or other contact sports in school increases your risk of dementia are not as robust yet due to a lack of large prospective studies. It is also very clear that there are many health risks of leading a sedentary lifestyle.”

World Rugby criticises call for scrum and tackle ban in school sport

World Rugby has criticised the claims in a study calling for tackling and scrums to be banned in school sport.

Allyson Pollock and Graham Kirkwood from the Institute of Health at Newcastle University argued in the British Medical Journal that most injuries in youth rugby occur due to the collision elements of the game.

The pair called for “harmful contact” to be prohibited on school playing fields. Removing collision from school rugby is likely to “reduce and mitigate the risk of injury” in pupils, they said.

However, in a statement, the sport’s governing body questioned the data on which the claims were based.

“World Rugby and its member unions take player safety very seriously and proactively pursue an evidence-based approach to reduce the risk of injury at all levels,” the statement said.

“These claims are not based on like-for-like injury statistics and the conclusions are not supported by the available data.

“It is well documented that, for most sports, injury rates increase with age, but the quoted research mixes 9-12 with 18-20 age groups.

“Indeed, within the published studies where injury has been properly defined and monitored, suggest the risk for pre-teens is not unacceptably high compared to other popular sports.”

Pollock and Kirkwood called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game.

In 2016, the nation’s most senior medics rejected a call for a ban on tackling in youth rugby.

But Pollock, who has been researching injuries and rugby injuries for more than 10 years, and senior research associate Kirkwood said that under United Nations conventions, governments have a “duty to protect children from risks of injury”.

“We call on the chief medical officers to act on the evidence and advise the UK government to put the interests of the child before those of corporate professional rugby unions and remove harmful contact from the school game,” they wrote.

“Most injures in youth rugby are because of the collision elements of the game, mainly the tackle.

“In March 2016, scientists and doctors from the Sport Collision Injury Collective called for the tackle and other forms of harmful contact to be removed from school rugby. The data in support of the call is compelling.”

That call was rejected by a range of former players and officials working within the game as well as World Rugby, however.

Nigel Owens MBE (@Nigelrefowens)

They will want to ban walking to school next. And only rubber pens and pencils to be used in class. What is the world coming too. https://t.co/CYMmk6WSgt

September 26, 2017

Dr Willie Stewart, a consultant neuropathologist who has been working in the field of brain injury for more than 15 years and sits on World Rugby’s Concussion Advisory Body, tweeted: “The health crisis facing Britain’s children is not #concussion but obesity and lack of exercise.”

Peter Robinson, the father of Ben Robinson, who died at 14 from second impact syndrome following a school game, and who worked with Stewart in helping to inspire a change in concussion guidelines, added on Twitter: “Banning tackling at schools not the answer. Mismanagement of Concussion is the greatest risk in the game.”

Citing previous research into sports injuries in youngsters, Pollock and Kirkwood had argued in the article that rugby, along with ice hockey and American football, have the highest concussion rates.

They said that rule changes in collision sports can make a difference, highlighting the Canadian ban on “body checking” – where a player deliberately makes contact with an opposing player – in ice hockey for under 13 year olds.

Meanwhile, in the UK “teacher training in the skills of rugby are lacking, as is concussion awareness training,” the pair wrote.

The researchers called on the UK chief medical officers to advise the British government to remove harmful contact from the game. They pointed to a history of concussion being associated with the “lowering of a person’s life chances” across a number of measures including low educational achievement and premature death. Meanwhile, a head injury is linked to an increased risk of dementia.

Commenting on the article, Prof Tara Spires-Jones, UK Dementia Research Institute programme lead and deputy director of the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Very strong, reproducible evidence supports a greater risk of dementia in people who have head injuries in their lifetimes, which urges caution in games where there is a significant risk of head injury.

“However, the data on specifically whether playing rugby or other contact sports in school increases your risk of dementia are not as robust yet due to a lack of large prospective studies. It is also very clear that there are many health risks of leading a sedentary lifestyle.”

Too few antibiotics in pipeline to tackle global drug-resistance crisis, WHO warns

Too few antibiotics are in the pipeline to tackle the global crisis of drug resistance, which is responsible for the rise of almost untreatable infections around the world, the World Health Organisation (WHO) warns.

Among the alarming diseases that are increasing and spreading is multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB), which requires treatment lasting between nine and 20 months. There are 250,000 deaths a year from drug-resistant TB and only 52% of patients globally are successfully treated. But only two new antibiotics for the disease have reached the market in 70 years.

The new WHO report, showing the paucity of new antibiotics being developed, lists 12 other pathogens that are serious dangers to health because we are running out of drugs to treat the infections they cause. Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae that have become resistant to the carbapenem class of antibiotic are all on the critical priority list. They are what are known as gram-negative bacteria, capable of causing a range of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis.

Hospital infections such as C. difficile and MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are also of major concern. They are a particular danger to patients who are already sick and have fragile immune systems.

“Antimicrobial resistance is a global health emergency that will seriously jeopardise progress in modern medicine,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the WHO. “There is an urgent need for more investment in research and development for antibiotic-resistant infections including TB, otherwise we will be forced back to a time when people feared common infections and risked their lives from minor surgery.”

Ed Whiting, director of policy at the Wellcome Trust agreed and said: “There is no doubt of the urgency – the world is running out of effective antibiotics and drug-resistant infections already kill 700,000 people a year globally. We’ve made good progress in getting this on the political agenda. But now, a year on from a major UN agreement, we must see concerted action – to reinvigorate the antibiotic pipeline, ensure responsible use of existing antibiotics, and address this threat across human, animal and environmental health.”

The report’s authors have found 51 new antibiotics and biologicals currently in development that may be able to treat the diseases caused by these resistant bugs. But that will not be anywhere near enough because of the length of time it takes to get drugs approved and onto the market, and because inevitably some of the drugs will not work.

“Given the average success rates and development times in the past, the current pipeline of antibiotics and biologicals could lead to around 10 new approvals over the next five years,” says the report. “However, these new treatments will add little to the already existing arsenal and will not be sufficient to tackle the impending antimicrobial resistance threat.”

More investment is needed in basic science, drug discovery and clinical development, it says, especially for those pathogens on the WHO’s critical priority list. Gram-negative bacteria are getting less research attention because they are harder to find drugs against.

Among all these candidate medicines, only eight are classed by the WHO as innovative treatments that will add value to the current antibiotic treatment arsenal. The rest are just modifications of drugs that already exist and may already be compromised.

“Pharmaceutical companies and researchers must urgently focus on new antibiotics against certain types of extremely serious infections that can kill patients in a matter of days because we have no line of defence,” says Dr Suzanne Hill, director of the department of essential medicines at the WHO which produced the report.

There is serious concern over the spread of first multi-drug-resistant TB and then extremely drug-resistant TB worldwide. Drug-resistant TB has been found all over the globe.
“Research for tuberculosis is seriously underfunded,” said Dr Mario Raviglione, director of the WHO Global TB Programme. “If we are to end TB, more than $ 800m per year is urgently needed to fund research.”

But new drugs will not be enough, says the WHO. Unless they are sparingly used, resistance will build to the new drugs as well. The WHO says it is working with countries and partners to improve infection prevention and control and to foster appropriate use of existing and future antibiotics. It is also developing guidance for the responsible use of antibiotics in the human, animal and agricultural sectors.

Pizza and crisps makers urged to reduce fat to tackle childhood obesity

Public health bosses are urging food manufacturers to make chips, pizzas, crisps and burgers healthier, opening a second front in efforts to tackle childhood obesity.

Public Health England wants to go further than the focus on cutting sugar by demanding firms that make products eaten regularly by children ensure they are far less fattening by reducing the calories in them.

The new emphasis on sources of calories from ingredients other than sugar has been prompted by growing concern that children’s waistlines are expanding because they are copying adults by consuming 200-300 calories too many per day.

Over 40,000 deaths a year – one in 10 – are linked to people being dangerously overweight, health experts say.

PHE will start by investigating how many calories these types of foods popular with children contain and issue what ministers say will be “strong guidance” on reformulating them, and exhort manufacturers and retailers to act to improve children’s health.

“A third of our children leave primary school overweight or obese and an excess of calories – not just excess sugar consumption – is the root cause of this,” said Duncan Selbie, PHE’s chief executive.

The move marks the latest stage of the government’s bid to reduce childhood obesity, which has been heavily criticised by health and children’s groups as too weak. Within weeks of becoming prime minister in July last year, Theresa May watered down what under her predecessor David Cameron was due to be a more robust strategy on the subject. Under May it became just a “plan for action”.

The initiative follows what PHE says is the “real progress” achieved over the past year in persuading manufacturers of sugary foods and soft drinks to cut the amount of sugar in their products. Nestle, Greggs, Starbucks, Kellogg’s and other firms have all pledged to do that, as have the makers of Lucozade and Ribena, and supermarkets such as Waitrose, Sainsbury’s and M&S.

They have done so with nine types of sugary foods, including breakfast cereals, cakes, ice-cream, biscuits and yogurt. But health experts claim that the introduction next April of the sugar levy is as key to why some soft drinks ranges are cutting sugar content as their desire to join the fight against childhood obesity.

However, health campaigners warn that the drive to make such foodstuffs less calorific, which also includes sandwiches and ready meals, may fail because companies do not have to take part.

PHE’s new calorie reduction plan is “welcome in principle but short on detail”, said Malcolm Clark, the coordinator of the Children’s Food Campaign.

“Beyond passing a sugary drinks tax into law, the government has so far provided thin gruel for parents and health professionals keen to see significant progress on tackling childhood obesity.”

Prof Graham MacGregor, chair of the campaign group Action on Sugar, said the sugar tax should be extended to confectionery.

Pizza and crisps makers urged to reduce fat to tackle childhood obesity

Public health bosses are urging food manufacturers to make chips, pizzas, crisps and burgers healthier, opening a second front in efforts to tackle childhood obesity.

Public Health England wants to go further than the focus on cutting sugar by demanding firms that make products eaten regularly by children ensure they are far less fattening by reducing the calories in them.

The new emphasis on sources of calories from ingredients other than sugar has been prompted by growing concern that children’s waistlines are expanding because they are copying adults by consuming 200-300 calories too many per day.

Over 40,000 deaths a year – one in 10 – are linked to people being dangerously overweight, health experts say.

PHE will start by investigating how many calories these types of foods popular with children contain and issue what ministers say will be “strong guidance” on reformulating them, and exhort manufacturers and retailers to act to improve children’s health.

“A third of our children leave primary school overweight or obese and an excess of calories – not just excess sugar consumption – is the root cause of this,” said Duncan Selbie, PHE’s chief executive.

The move marks the latest stage of the government’s bid to reduce childhood obesity, which has been heavily criticised by health and children’s groups as too weak. Within weeks of becoming prime minister in July last year, Theresa May watered down what under her predecessor David Cameron was due to be a more robust strategy on the subject. Under May it became just a “plan for action”.

The initiative follows what PHE says is the “real progress” achieved over the past year in persuading manufacturers of sugary foods and soft drinks to cut the amount of sugar in their products. Nestle, Greggs, Starbucks, Kellogg’s and other firms have all pledged to do that, as have the makers of Lucozade and Ribena, and supermarkets such as Waitrose, Sainsbury’s and M&S.

They have done so with nine types of sugary foods, including breakfast cereals, cakes, ice-cream, biscuits and yogurt. But health experts claim that the introduction next April of the sugar levy is as key to why some soft drinks ranges are cutting sugar content as their desire to join the fight against childhood obesity.

However, health campaigners warn that the drive to make such foodstuffs less calorific, which also includes sandwiches and ready meals, may fail because companies do not have to take part.

PHE’s new calorie reduction plan is “welcome in principle but short on detail”, said Malcolm Clark, the coordinator of the Children’s Food Campaign.

“Beyond passing a sugary drinks tax into law, the government has so far provided thin gruel for parents and health professionals keen to see significant progress on tackling childhood obesity.”

Prof Graham MacGregor, chair of the campaign group Action on Sugar, said the sugar tax should be extended to confectionery.

Pizza and crisps makers urged to reduce fat to tackle childhood obesity

Public health bosses are urging food manufacturers to make chips, pizzas, crisps and burgers healthier, opening a second front in efforts to tackle childhood obesity.

Public Health England wants to go further than the focus on cutting sugar by demanding firms that make products eaten regularly by children ensure they are far less fattening by reducing the calories in them.

The new emphasis on sources of calories from ingredients other than sugar has been prompted by growing concern that children’s waistlines are expanding because they are copying adults by consuming 200-300 calories too many per day.

Over 40,000 deaths a year – one in 10 – are linked to people being dangerously overweight, health experts say.

PHE will start by investigating how many calories these types of foods popular with children contain and issue what ministers say will be “strong guidance” on reformulating them, and exhort manufacturers and retailers to act to improve children’s health.

“A third of our children leave primary school overweight or obese and an excess of calories – not just excess sugar consumption – is the root cause of this,” said Duncan Selbie, PHE’s chief executive.

The move marks the latest stage of the government’s bid to reduce childhood obesity, which has been heavily criticised by health and children’s groups as too weak. Within weeks of becoming prime minister in July last year, Theresa May watered down what under her predecessor David Cameron was due to be a more robust strategy on the subject. Under May it became just a “plan for action”.

The initiative follows what PHE says is the “real progress” achieved over the past year in persuading manufacturers of sugary foods and soft drinks to cut the amount of sugar in their products. Nestle, Greggs, Starbucks, Kellogg’s and other firms have all pledged to do that, as have the makers of Lucozade and Ribena, and supermarkets such as Waitrose, Sainsbury’s and M&S.

They have done so with nine types of sugary foods, including breakfast cereals, cakes, ice-cream, biscuits and yogurt. But health experts claim that the introduction next April of the sugar levy is as key to why some soft drinks ranges are cutting sugar content as their desire to join the fight against childhood obesity.

However, health campaigners warn that the drive to make such foodstuffs less calorific, which also includes sandwiches and ready meals, may fail because companies do not have to take part.

PHE’s new calorie reduction plan is “welcome in principle but short on detail”, said Malcolm Clark, the coordinator of the Children’s Food Campaign.

“Beyond passing a sugary drinks tax into law, the government has so far provided thin gruel for parents and health professionals keen to see significant progress on tackling childhood obesity.”

Prof Graham MacGregor, chair of the campaign group Action on Sugar, said the sugar tax should be extended to confectionery.