Tag Archives: tests’

Doctors should order more blood cancer tests, MPs say

TV presenter Simon Thomas, whose wife died from a rare form of blood cancer last year, is calling for better training of GPs

Sky sports presenter, Simon Thomas


The Sky Sports presenter Simon Thomas says doctors only diagnosed his wife’s acute myeloid leukaemia three days before she died. Photograph: Nick Potts/PA

The Sky Sports presenter Simon Thomas has revealed that doctors missed his wife’s blood cancer three times in the days before her death.

Thomas called for better training of GPs on the same day as politicians said doctors should order blood tests for any patient who shows symptoms of blood cancer.

Thomas’s wife, Gemma, died aged 40 in November, just three days after being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), a rare form of the disease.

Gemma initially had flu-like symptoms and went to see a doctor three times over the course of six days before she was finally admitted to hospital, where her condition continued to deteriorate, despite intensive chemotherapy treatment.

Since then, her husband Simon has raised more than £30,000 for charity. The money has been divided between Maggie’s Centres, a charity which offers support to people affected by cancer, and a refugee project that Gemma had launched.

On Wednesday, Thomas tweeted: “Three times my wife Gemma went to the doctor in six days and three times she was sent home and told to rest.

“Four days after her final visit to the her GP she was dead. We have to help and train our GPs and to detect blood cancer earlier.”

Simon Thomas (@SimonThomasSky)

Three times my wife Gemma went to the doctor in six days and three times she was sent home and told to rest. Four days after her final visit to her GP she was dead. We have to help and train our GP’s and to detect #bloodcancer earlier. @bloodwise_uk is doing this. #hiddencancer https://t.co/V1uEz1HCLF

January 17, 2018

Simon Thomas (@SimonThomasSky)

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia took my wife Gemma and Ethan’s Mum just before Christmas aged only 40 years and just three days after being diagnosed. This is so important. @bloodwise_uk https://t.co/V1uEz1HCLF

January 17, 2018

Thomas, 44, has been tweeting and blogging about his grief following Gemma’s death from AML, which affects around 2,600 people in Britain each year.

Thomas said he doesn’t blame the doctors who initially saw his wife before she was taken to hospital, but has encouraged people to seek a diagnosis from medics if they continue to feel unwell.

Simon Thomas (@SimonThomasSky)

The darkness will hopefully not overcome. pic.twitter.com/umuBOT0TdW

January 2, 2018

The all-party parliamentary group on blood cancer said on Wednesday that many signs of blood cancer can be “misunderstood or misdiagnosed”.

In a new report, the group said that diagnosing blood cancer – such as leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma – can be “complex”.

Highlighting one patient group, MPs described how some elderly myeloma patients reporting symptoms of back ache and bone pain are told their symptom is “part of the ageing process”.

In order to improve early diagnosis rates, they called on GPs to immediately order a blood test for anyone presenting with one or more symptoms of blood cancer.

Symptoms of blood cancers can be similar to the symptoms of feeling “run down” or flu, such as fatigue, night sweats, weight loss, bruising and pain, they said.

The chair of the patient group, Henry Smith, an MP whose mother died from acute myeloid leukaemia in 2012, said: “Blood cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and someone is diagnosed every 14 minutes.

“Delays in diagnosis can have a severe impact on an individual’s chance of survival, as well as on their quality of life.”

Commenting on the report, professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, chair of the Royal College of GPs, said: ““Each type of blood cancer can present in a varied way and GPs will base their decisions around what diagnostic testing is most appropriate on the symptoms being displayed by, and the unique circumstances potentially affecting, the patient in front of us.

“Any decision to pursue opportunistic testing must not be undertaken lightly as GPs need a good scientific evidence base before they order any investigations.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”

Anger after report finds birth defects not caused by hormone pregnancy tests

A hormone pregnancy test used in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects, according to an official review, which has been severely criticised by campaigners.

An expert working group set up by the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) concluded there was no “causal association” between a drug called Primodos and severe disabilities in babies.

However, MPs and families who have campaigned against hormone pregnancy tests (HPTs) for more than 40 years, said the report was a whitewash.

Yasmin Qureshi, the MP for Bolton South East, said there should be a judicial review or a separate inquiry to examine allegations of a cover-up by medical regulators at the time.

The Labour MP said: “I am completely disgusted by the report. They clearly have not looked at the evidence that was presented to them. If they had looked at the evidence presented to them they could never have arrived at the conclusion they have now. This report is a complete whitewash. It is not worth the paper it has been printed on.”

Mims Davies, the Conservative MP for Eastleigh, said she was disappointed by the report and would be meeting with the prime minister to raise her concerns.

Davies said: “I was thoroughly dissatisfied by the complete lack of transparency in the creation and preparation of this report, with the only representative of campaigners against these historic injustices on the panel being gagged by a confidentiality agreement and prevented from speaking about the report’s preparation.”

The expert group recommended that families who took an HPT and experienced an “adverse pregnancy outcome” should be offered genetic testing to establish whether there was a different underlying cause.

Campaigners believe that as well as causing disabilities, the drugs could also cause miscarriage or stillbirth.

Marie Lyon, chair of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests, said: “It’s truly shocking and I am appalled by the report. We all feel betrayed, and I feel like I have no faith in government health agencies now. I am distraught for our members, who still haven’t had the answers they need.”

Charlotte Fensome, whose brother Steven has severe epilepsy, said she was horrified by the report.

“I’m obviously hugely disappointed by this report. My parents are 81 and 76, and they are struggling every day with my brother. Every victim of Primodos is a personal tragedy, and I am shocked at how this investigation has been carried out.

“My mother was given Primodos when she was eight weeks pregnant, and my brother was born with severe brain damage. It affects the whole family every single day. This is just a battle, and there is a long war ahead.”

The expert group assessed a number of studies looking at a possible link between women given an HPT to diagnose pregnancy and congenital anomalies in babies, but concluded there was no connection.

The expert group found that “although there was never any reliable evidence that HPTs were unsafe, concern about this issue, coupled with the development of better pregnancy tests” led to the use of HPTs being restricted in the 1970s.

A 1967 report found there might be a link between HPTs and spina bifida, and – following the thalidomide scandal which had recently led to that drug being withdrawn – concerns about HPTs rose dramatically.

Primodos, which was also used to treat menstruation problems, was then withdrawn completely in 1978. “Whether these precautionary actions were sufficiently timely became a subject of controversy,” noted the report.

Modern pregnancy tests measure hormone levels in a woman’s urine. The older HPTs contained synthetic versions of two hormones found naturally in the body. Two pills were taken on consecutive days, with a withdrawal bleed a few days later in those who were not pregnant.

Primodos contained synthetic versions of progesterone and estrogen.

Prof Stuart Ralston, the chair of the CHM, said: “This was a comprehensive and wide-ranging scientific review of all the available evidence on the possible association between HPTs and birth defects by internationally leading experts across a broad range of specialisms.”

Dr Ailsa Gebbie, the chair of the expert working group, said: “Our recommendations will strengthen further the systems in place for detecting, evaluating and communicating risk with use of medicines in pregnancy and help safeguard future generations.”

A spokeswoman for Bayer AG, which acquired Primodos manufacturer Schering in 2006, said: “Bayer notes that a review by an independent expert working group on hormone pregnancy tests of the Commission on Human Medicines has found, consistent with Bayer’s view, based on all available data, that the scientific evidence does not support a causal association between the use of hormone pregnancy tests, such as Primodos, and birth defects or miscarriage.”