Tag Archives: twothirds

One cigarette ‘may lead to habit for more than two-thirds of people’

More than two-thirds of people who try just one cigarette may go on to become regular smokers, new research suggests.

Researchers found that just over 60% of adults said they had tried a cigarette at some point in their lives, with almost 69% of those noting that they had, at least for a period, gone on to smoke cigarettes daily.

“[This shows] prevention, providing [fewer] opportunities or reasons for young people to try a cigarette, is a good idea,” said Peter Hajek, co-author of the research, from Queen Mary University of London.

The research, published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, is based on data pooled from eight surveys conducted since the year 2000, including three each from the UK and USA, and a further two studies from Australia and New Zealand.

Together, the surveys included more than 216,000 respondents, with between 50% and 82% saying that, after trying a cigarette, they had gone on to smoke on a daily basis – at least temporarily. Further analysis showed that, taken together, an estimated 68.9% of individuals smoked daily for a period after trying a cigarette.

The team also looked at whether the results were likely to be skewed by smokers being less likely to respond in surveys than non-smokers, but no strong effect was found. However, the authors note that the study also has other limitations, including that the findings are based on respondents self-reporting information, meaning the resulting figures are only an estimate.

“It is possible that somebody who is a lifetime non-smoker did try a cigarette when they were a kid but it didn’t make any impression on them, and they forgot it or don’t see that it is important enough to report,” said Hajek. But, he added, “I think even if you assume there is a recall issue and other things, you are talking about more than a 50% [conversion rate from trying a cigarette to daily smoking].”

Decline in British smoking since 1974

Hajek added that declining rates of smoking among younger people suggested that measures such as restrictions on sales and a shift away from portraying it as glamorous were having a positive effect. But, he noted, the influence of e-cigarettes should also be explored, since the decline in smoking rates in England has accelerated since the devices came onto the market.

Linda Bauld, professor of health policy at the University of Stirling, said the study highlighted the importance of preventing smoking in the first place.

“Tobacco use starts in childhood for two-thirds of smokers in the UK, and this study suggests that even trying a cigarette becomes regular use in most cases,” she said.

“Fortunately, in the UK, youth smoking rates continue to decline – but we shouldn’t be complacent,” she added, noting that according to recent figures every year approximately 200,000 children in the UK try cigarettes for the first time. According to recent reports, there were almost one billion smokers worldwide in 2015, with numbers expected to rise – despite a drop in prevalence – as the global population grows.

Global smoking prevalence

Bauld also agreed that the role of e-cigarettes merited further study, pointing out that while it had been assumed that experimentation with e-cigarettes would also lead to regular use, that does not appear to be the case. “

While rates of e-cigarette experimentation amongst young people have risen in recent years, rates of regular use in teenagers who have never smoked remain at well below 1%, she said. “We need to be clear about this distinction and keep our focus on doing everything we can to prevent smoking, which we know is deadly, rather than demonising vaping, which all the evidence suggests is a hugely less harmful behaviour.”

One cigarette ‘may lead to habit for more than two-thirds of people’

More than two-thirds of people who try just one cigarette may go on to become regular smokers, new research suggests.

Researchers found that just over 60% of adults said they had tried a cigarette at some point in their lives, with almost 69% of those noting that they had, at least for a period, gone on to smoke cigarettes daily.

“[This shows] prevention, providing [fewer] opportunities or reasons for young people to try a cigarette, is a good idea,” said Peter Hajek, co-author of the research, from Queen Mary University of London.

The research, published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, is based on data pooled from eight surveys conducted since the year 2000, including three each from the UK and USA, and a further two studies from Australia and New Zealand.

Together, the surveys included more than 216,000 respondents, with between 50% and 82% saying that, after trying a cigarette, they had gone on to smoke on a daily basis – at least temporarily. Further analysis showed that, taken together, an estimated 68.9% of individuals smoked daily for a period after trying a cigarette.

The team also looked at whether the results were likely to be skewed by smokers being less likely to respond in surveys than non-smokers, but no strong effect was found. However, the authors note that the study also has other limitations, including that the findings are based on respondents self-reporting information, meaning the resulting figures are only an estimate.

“It is possible that somebody who is a lifetime non-smoker did try a cigarette when they were a kid but it didn’t make any impression on them, and they forgot it or don’t see that it is important enough to report,” said Hajek. But, he added, “I think even if you assume there is a recall issue and other things, you are talking about more than a 50% [conversion rate from trying a cigarette to daily smoking].”

Decline in British smoking since 1974

Hajek added that declining rates of smoking among younger people suggested that measures such as restrictions on sales and a shift away from portraying it as glamorous were having a positive effect. But, he noted, the influence of e-cigarettes should also be explored, since the decline in smoking rates in England has accelerated since the devices came onto the market.

Linda Bauld, professor of health policy at the University of Stirling, said the study highlighted the importance of preventing smoking in the first place.

“Tobacco use starts in childhood for two-thirds of smokers in the UK, and this study suggests that even trying a cigarette becomes regular use in most cases,” she said.

“Fortunately, in the UK, youth smoking rates continue to decline – but we shouldn’t be complacent,” she added, noting that according to recent figures every year approximately 200,000 children in the UK try cigarettes for the first time. According to recent reports, there were almost one billion smokers worldwide in 2015, with numbers expected to rise – despite a drop in prevalence – as the global population grows.

Global smoking prevalence

Bauld also agreed that the role of e-cigarettes merited further study, pointing out that while it had been assumed that experimentation with e-cigarettes would also lead to regular use, that does not appear to be the case. “

While rates of e-cigarette experimentation amongst young people have risen in recent years, rates of regular use in teenagers who have never smoked remain at well below 1%, she said. “We need to be clear about this distinction and keep our focus on doing everything we can to prevent smoking, which we know is deadly, rather than demonising vaping, which all the evidence suggests is a hugely less harmful behaviour.”

One cigarette ‘may lead to habit for more than two-thirds of people’

More than two-thirds of people who try just one cigarette may go on to become regular smokers, new research suggests.

Researchers found that just over 60% of adults said they had tried a cigarette at some point in their lives, with almost 69% of those noting that they had, at least for a period, gone on to smoke cigarettes daily.

“[This shows] prevention, providing [fewer] opportunities or reasons for young people to try a cigarette, is a good idea,” said Peter Hajek, co-author of the research, from Queen Mary University of London.

The research, published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, is based on data pooled from eight surveys conducted since the year 2000, including three each from the UK and USA, and a further two studies from Australia and New Zealand.

Together, the surveys included more than 216,000 respondents, with between 50% and 82% saying that, after trying a cigarette, they had gone on to smoke on a daily basis – at least temporarily. Further analysis showed that, taken together, an estimated 68.9% of individuals smoked daily for a period after trying a cigarette.

The team also looked at whether the results were likely to be skewed by smokers being less likely to respond in surveys than non-smokers, but no strong effect was found. However, the authors note that the study also has other limitations, including that the findings are based on respondents self-reporting information, meaning the resulting figures are only an estimate.

“It is possible that somebody who is a lifetime non-smoker did try a cigarette when they were a kid but it didn’t make any impression on them, and they forgot it or don’t see that it is important enough to report,” said Hajek. But, he added, “I think even if you assume there is a recall issue and other things, you are talking about more than a 50% [conversion rate from trying a cigarette to daily smoking].”

Decline in British smoking since 1974

Hajek added that declining rates of smoking among younger people suggested that measures such as restrictions on sales and a shift away from portraying it as glamorous were having a positive effect. But, he noted, the influence of e-cigarettes should also be explored, since the decline in smoking rates in England has accelerated since the devices came onto the market.

Linda Bauld, professor of health policy at the University of Stirling, said the study highlighted the importance of preventing smoking in the first place.

“Tobacco use starts in childhood for two-thirds of smokers in the UK, and this study suggests that even trying a cigarette becomes regular use in most cases,” she said.

“Fortunately, in the UK, youth smoking rates continue to decline – but we shouldn’t be complacent,” she added, noting that according to recent figures every year approximately 200,000 children in the UK try cigarettes for the first time. According to recent reports, there were almost one billion smokers worldwide in 2015, with numbers expected to rise – despite a drop in prevalence – as the global population grows.

Global smoking prevalence

Bauld also agreed that the role of e-cigarettes merited further study, pointing out that while it had been assumed that experimentation with e-cigarettes would also lead to regular use, that does not appear to be the case. “

While rates of e-cigarette experimentation amongst young people have risen in recent years, rates of regular use in teenagers who have never smoked remain at well below 1%, she said. “We need to be clear about this distinction and keep our focus on doing everything we can to prevent smoking, which we know is deadly, rather than demonising vaping, which all the evidence suggests is a hugely less harmful behaviour.”

Sausage sandwich has two-thirds of daily salt allowance, study finds

The humble sausage sandwich could contain nearly two-thirds of an adult’s maximum daily recommended intake of salt – more than a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries, a health group has warned.

Research by Consensus Action on Salt and Health (Cash) has revealed “shocking and excessively high” amounts of salt in well-known brands of the British banger – a favourite in the UK – but vegetarian options are just as unhealthy.

Cash said many companies had failed to reduce salt in their products with just three weeks left for them to reach 2017 targets set by Public Health England.

The British eat more than 175,000 tonnes of sausages each year, despite them being named by the World Health Organisation in 2015 as a likely cause of cancer.

The survey found that the average salt content of sausages was 1.3g per 100g, or 1.16g per typical portion of two sausages – a figure that has remained relatively unchanged since 2011, exceeding the salt reduction targets in place at that time. The maximum daily recommended intake for an adult is 6g.

The saltiest sausages were Iceland’s Jumbo Pork range, at 1.28g each, but that went up to 3.78g including the ingredients for a sandwich, compared with 3.22g for a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries.

Researchers collected data for 212 chilled, frozen, vegetarian and meat sausages sold by all the major supermarkets, but excluding sausage rolls, cocktail sausages and frankfurters.

They found a wide range of salt levels across all sausages, from the highest in Richmond’s 12 Skinless Pork Sausages at 2.3g per 100g to the lowest in the Co-operative’s Irresistible 6 Sweet Chilli Sausages at 0.75g per 100g – a threefold difference in salt content per 100g.

They also uncovered large variations within supermarket own-brand sausages, with Asda’s Extra Special Bacon & Maple Syrup option containing 1.1g of salt per sausage – more than double the same retailer’s Extra Special Lincolnshire Pork Sausages.

Even going meat-free is not a healthy option, with Quorn’s vegetarian Best of British Sausages containing 1.9g of salt per 100g, or 2.2g in two sausages, which is more than the salt content of half a Pizza Hut Margherita pizza.

The worst offender overall is Richmond, whose full range of sausages tops other manufacturers for salt. In fact, the salt content of its sausages has remained consistently high since at least 2011, which Cash said suggested Richmond had made no effort to reduce it.

About 85% of meat sausages surveyed by Cash were also high in saturated fat – another cause of strokes and heart disease – while Sainsbury’s Taste The Difference Toulouse Inspired British Pork Sausages contained 12.2g of saturated fat per two sausages, more than half the recommended daily maximum intake of saturated fat for women.

Some of the biggest brands, including Richmond, Wall’s and Iceland, failed to provide traffic light labelling on their packaging, even using a portion size as one sausage, which Cash said was “completely unrealistic”.

“The UK has led the world on salt reduction but this survey clearly shows that many companies are not cooperating with the current voluntary policy,” said Graham MacGregor, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Queen Mary University of London and chairman of Cash. “Public Health England, which is now responsible, must get tough on those companies not complying and set new mandatory targets to be achieved by 2020. Otherwise, thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks every year.”

The Guardian contacted Richmond for comment.

A spokeswoman for Quorn said: “Quorn produces a range of sausages, with its bestselling Quorn Sausages being low in salt and highlighted on the front of pack. The range featured by Cash is Quorn’s Best of British Sausages, which offer slightly more indulgent sausages. While they are higher in salt, as clearly marked on pack, they are still low in saturated fat.”

Dr Alison Tedstone, Public Health England’s chief nutritionist, commented: “Our salt consumption has decreased over the last decade – a loaf of bread has 40% less than it used to. However, some products are still too high in salt and we know this can be reduced further.”

Sausage sandwich has two-thirds of daily salt allowance, study finds

The humble sausage sandwich could contain nearly two-thirds of an adult’s maximum daily recommended intake of salt – more than a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries, a health group has warned.

Research by Consensus Action on Salt and Health (Cash) has revealed “shocking and excessively high” amounts of salt in well-known brands of the British banger – a favourite in the UK – but vegetarian options are just as unhealthy.

Cash said many companies had failed to reduce salt in their products with just three weeks left for them to reach 2017 targets set by Public Health England.

The British eat more than 175,000 tonnes of sausages each year, despite them being named by the World Health Organisation in 2015 as a likely cause of cancer.

The survey found that the average salt content of sausages was 1.3g per 100g, or 1.16g per typical portion of two sausages – a figure that has remained relatively unchanged since 2011, exceeding the salt reduction targets in place at that time. The maximum daily recommended intake for an adult is 6g.

The saltiest sausages were Iceland’s Jumbo Pork range, at 1.28g each, but that went up to 3.78g including the ingredients for a sandwich, compared with 3.22g for a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries.

Researchers collected data for 212 chilled, frozen, vegetarian and meat sausages sold by all the major supermarkets, but excluding sausage rolls, cocktail sausages and frankfurters.

They found a wide range of salt levels across all sausages, from the highest in Richmond’s 12 Skinless Pork Sausages at 2.3g per 100g to the lowest in the Co-operative’s Irresistible 6 Sweet Chilli Sausages at 0.75g per 100g – a threefold difference in salt content per 100g.

They also uncovered large variations within supermarket own-brand sausages, with Asda’s Extra Special Bacon & Maple Syrup option containing 1.1g of salt per sausage – more than double the same retailer’s Extra Special Lincolnshire Pork Sausages.

Even going meat-free is not a healthy option, with Quorn’s vegetarian Best of British Sausages containing 1.9g of salt per 100g, or 2.2g in two sausages, which is more than the salt content of half a Pizza Hut Margherita pizza.

The worst offender overall is Richmond, whose full range of sausages tops other manufacturers for salt. In fact, the salt content of its sausages has remained consistently high since at least 2011, which Cash said suggested Richmond had made no effort to reduce it.

About 85% of meat sausages surveyed by Cash were also high in saturated fat – another cause of strokes and heart disease – while Sainsbury’s Taste The Difference Toulouse Inspired British Pork Sausages contained 12.2g of saturated fat per two sausages, more than half the recommended daily maximum intake of saturated fat for women.

Some of the biggest brands, including Richmond, Wall’s and Iceland, failed to provide traffic light labelling on their packaging, even using a portion size as one sausage, which Cash said was “completely unrealistic”.

“The UK has led the world on salt reduction but this survey clearly shows that many companies are not cooperating with the current voluntary policy,” said Graham MacGregor, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Queen Mary University of London and chairman of Cash. “Public Health England, which is now responsible, must get tough on those companies not complying and set new mandatory targets to be achieved by 2020. Otherwise, thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks every year.”

The Guardian contacted Richmond for comment.

A spokeswoman for Quorn said: “Quorn produces a range of sausages, with its bestselling Quorn Sausages being low in salt and highlighted on the front of pack. The range featured by Cash is Quorn’s Best of British Sausages, which offer slightly more indulgent sausages. While they are higher in salt, as clearly marked on pack, they are still low in saturated fat.”

Dr Alison Tedstone, Public Health England’s chief nutritionist, commented: “Our salt consumption has decreased over the last decade – a loaf of bread has 40% less than it used to. However, some products are still too high in salt and we know this can be reduced further.”

Sausage sandwich has two-thirds of daily salt allowance, study finds

The humble sausage sandwich could contain nearly two-thirds of an adult’s maximum daily recommended intake of salt – more than a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries, a health group has warned.

Research by Consensus Action on Salt and Health (Cash) has revealed “shocking and excessively high” amounts of salt in well-known brands of the British banger – a favourite in the UK – but vegetarian options are just as unhealthy.

Cash said many companies had failed to reduce salt in their products with just three weeks left for them to reach 2017 targets set by Public Health England.

The British eat more than 175,000 tonnes of sausages each year, despite them being named by the World Health Organisation in 2015 as a likely cause of cancer.

The survey found that the average salt content of sausages was 1.3g per 100g, or 1.16g per typical portion of two sausages – a figure that has remained relatively unchanged since 2011, exceeding the salt reduction targets in place at that time. The maximum daily recommended intake for an adult is 6g.

The saltiest sausages were Iceland’s Jumbo Pork range, at 1.28g each, but that went up to 3.78g including the ingredients for a sandwich, compared with 3.22g for a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries.

Researchers collected data for 212 chilled, frozen, vegetarian and meat sausages sold by all the major supermarkets, but excluding sausage rolls, cocktail sausages and frankfurters.

They found a wide range of salt levels across all sausages, from the highest in Richmond’s 12 Skinless Pork Sausages at 2.3g per 100g to the lowest in the Co-operative’s Irresistible 6 Sweet Chilli Sausages at 0.75g per 100g – a threefold difference in salt content per 100g.

They also uncovered large variations within supermarket own-brand sausages, with Asda’s Extra Special Bacon & Maple Syrup option containing 1.1g of salt per sausage – more than double the same retailer’s Extra Special Lincolnshire Pork Sausages.

Even going meat-free is not a healthy option, with Quorn’s vegetarian Best of British Sausages containing 1.9g of salt per 100g, or 2.2g in two sausages, which is more than the salt content of half a Pizza Hut Margherita pizza.

The worst offender overall is Richmond, whose full range of sausages tops other manufacturers for salt. In fact, the salt content of its sausages has remained consistently high since at least 2011, which Cash said suggested Richmond had made no effort to reduce it.

About 85% of meat sausages surveyed by Cash were also high in saturated fat – another cause of strokes and heart disease – while Sainsbury’s Taste The Difference Toulouse Inspired British Pork Sausages contained 12.2g of saturated fat per two sausages, more than half the recommended daily maximum intake of saturated fat for women.

Some of the biggest brands, including Richmond, Wall’s and Iceland, failed to provide traffic light labelling on their packaging, even using a portion size as one sausage, which Cash said was “completely unrealistic”.

“The UK has led the world on salt reduction but this survey clearly shows that many companies are not cooperating with the current voluntary policy,” said Graham MacGregor, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Queen Mary University of London and chairman of Cash. “Public Health England, which is now responsible, must get tough on those companies not complying and set new mandatory targets to be achieved by 2020. Otherwise, thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks every year.”

The Guardian contacted Richmond for comment.

A spokeswoman for Quorn said: “Quorn produces a range of sausages, with its bestselling Quorn Sausages being low in salt and highlighted on the front of pack. The range featured by Cash is Quorn’s Best of British Sausages, which offer slightly more indulgent sausages. While they are higher in salt, as clearly marked on pack, they are still low in saturated fat.”

Dr Alison Tedstone, Public Health England’s chief nutritionist, commented: “Our salt consumption has decreased over the last decade – a loaf of bread has 40% less than it used to. However, some products are still too high in salt and we know this can be reduced further.”

Sausage sandwich has two-thirds of daily salt allowance, study finds

The humble sausage sandwich could contain nearly two-thirds of an adult’s maximum daily recommended intake of salt – more than a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries, a health group has warned.

Research by Consensus Action on Salt and Health (Cash) has revealed “shocking and excessively high” amounts of salt in well-known brands of the British banger – a favourite in the UK – but vegetarian options are just as unhealthy.

Cash said many companies had failed to reduce salt in their products with just three weeks left for them to reach 2017 targets set by Public Health England.

The British eat more than 175,000 tonnes of sausages each year, despite them being named by the World Health Organisation in 2015 as a likely cause of cancer.

The survey found that the average salt content of sausages was 1.3g per 100g, or 1.16g per typical portion of two sausages – a figure that has remained relatively unchanged since 2011, exceeding the salt reduction targets in place at that time. The maximum daily recommended intake for an adult is 6g.

The saltiest sausages were Iceland’s Jumbo Pork range, at 1.28g each, but that went up to 3.78g including the ingredients for a sandwich, compared with 3.22g for a McDonald’s double cheeseburger and large fries.

Researchers collected data for 212 chilled, frozen, vegetarian and meat sausages sold by all the major supermarkets, but excluding sausage rolls, cocktail sausages and frankfurters.

They found a wide range of salt levels across all sausages, from the highest in Richmond’s 12 Skinless Pork Sausages at 2.3g per 100g to the lowest in the Co-operative’s Irresistible 6 Sweet Chilli Sausages at 0.75g per 100g – a threefold difference in salt content per 100g.

They also uncovered large variations within supermarket own-brand sausages, with Asda’s Extra Special Bacon & Maple Syrup option containing 1.1g of salt per sausage – more than double the same retailer’s Extra Special Lincolnshire Pork Sausages.

Even going meat-free is not a healthy option, with Quorn’s vegetarian Best of British Sausages containing 1.9g of salt per 100g, or 2.2g in two sausages, which is more than the salt content of half a Pizza Hut Margherita pizza.

The worst offender overall is Richmond, whose full range of sausages tops other manufacturers for salt. In fact, the salt content of its sausages has remained consistently high since at least 2011, which Cash said suggested Richmond had made no effort to reduce it.

About 85% of meat sausages surveyed by Cash were also high in saturated fat – another cause of strokes and heart disease – while Sainsbury’s Taste The Difference Toulouse Inspired British Pork Sausages contained 12.2g of saturated fat per two sausages, more than half the recommended daily maximum intake of saturated fat for women.

Some of the biggest brands, including Richmond, Wall’s and Iceland, failed to provide traffic light labelling on their packaging, even using a portion size as one sausage, which Cash said was “completely unrealistic”.

“The UK has led the world on salt reduction but this survey clearly shows that many companies are not cooperating with the current voluntary policy,” said Graham MacGregor, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Queen Mary University of London and chairman of Cash. “Public Health England, which is now responsible, must get tough on those companies not complying and set new mandatory targets to be achieved by 2020. Otherwise, thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks every year.”

The Guardian contacted Richmond for comment.

A spokeswoman for Quorn said: “Quorn produces a range of sausages, with its bestselling Quorn Sausages being low in salt and highlighted on the front of pack. The range featured by Cash is Quorn’s Best of British Sausages, which offer slightly more indulgent sausages. While they are higher in salt, as clearly marked on pack, they are still low in saturated fat.”

Dr Alison Tedstone, Public Health England’s chief nutritionist, commented: “Our salt consumption has decreased over the last decade – a loaf of bread has 40% less than it used to. However, some products are still too high in salt and we know this can be reduced further.”

Two-thirds of children referred for mental healthcare in England not treated

Sixty per cent of children and young people referred for specialist care by their GP are not receiving treatment, figures reveal.

Data from 32 NHS Trusts in England showed about 60% of under-18s who are referred to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) by their GP are not receiving treatment, according to figures obtained by Spurgeons children’s charity.

The number of under-18s admitted to A&E for self-harm has increased by 50% in five years but outpatient treatment rates are falling, according to the charity. Self-harm admissions to A&E departments for young people have increased for the seventh year running according to figures from 59 A&E departments in England.

The sharp increase in the number of under-18s being admitted to hospital after poisoning, cutting or hanging themselves is more marked among girls, though an increase has also been seen among boys. About 77% of A&E or hospital admissions for self-harm were made by girls from 2010 to 2016.

The news comes after it emerged that children with anxiety and depression will be guaranteed treatment within four weeks in a effort to improve mental healthcare, but the lack of NHS staff and funding means the plan cannot be fully introduced until 2021.

In a bid to ease pressure on the system, Spurgeons children’s charity said it had created a new programme – named FISH – for young people to help those who have self-harmed but do not have a mental health diagnosis and therefore do not qualify for specialist mental health support services such as CAMHS.

“The facts are harrowing. At least four young people in every secondary school class are now self-harming. Within the last decade we’ve seen a considerable rise in the range of mental health issues impacting young people, in part due to social media pressures and the ongoing stigma towards speaking about our mental health,” said Jag Basra, an assistant psychologist and lead on FISH.

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, the chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ child and adolescent faculty, called on NHS England to stand by its pledge to invest an additional £1bn in frontline mental health services and treat 1 million more people by 2021.

“Young people are presenting in ever greater numbers to A&E, GP referral rates have soared, and our workforce is struggling to meet this demand,” she said. “Our young people urgently need access to timely specialist treatment as well as investment in early intervention and prevention [...] This is a matter of life and death.”

The figures were “alarming”, said Tom Madders, campaigns director at YoungMinds. “We know from calls to our parents’ helpline that far too many young people with mental health problems do not get the help they need, and that too often the right support is not available until they reach crisis point,” he said.

“That’s why the government must ensure that CAMHS funding reflects the true scale of the need, and that money is not siphoned off to other priorities.”

Barbara Keeley MP, the shadow minister for social care and mental health, said the “continual increase” in A&E admissions for under-18s due to self-harm was concerning.

“Children and young people’s mental health services will be plunged into further crisis by an inadequate Tory budget which ignored mental health entirely,” she said.

“The lack of access to services for two-thirds of children is a damning reminder of the Tories’ failure to match their warm words about mental health with action.”

Two-thirds of children referred for mental healthcare in England not treated

Sixty per cent of children and young people referred for specialist care by their GP are not receiving treatment, figures reveal.

Data from 32 NHS Trusts in England showed about 60% of under-18s who are referred to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) by their GP are not receiving treatment, according to figures obtained by Spurgeons children’s charity.

The number of under-18s admitted to A&E for self-harm has increased by 50% in five years but outpatient treatment rates are falling, according to the charity. Self-harm admissions to A&E departments for young people have increased for the seventh year running according to figures from 59 A&E departments in England.

The sharp increase in the number of under-18s being admitted to hospital after poisoning, cutting or hanging themselves is more marked among girls, though an increase has also been seen among boys. About 77% of A&E or hospital admissions for self-harm were made by girls from 2010 to 2016.

The news comes after it emerged that children with anxiety and depression will be guaranteed treatment within four weeks in a effort to improve mental healthcare, but the lack of NHS staff and funding means the plan cannot be fully introduced until 2021.

In a bid to ease pressure on the system, Spurgeons children’s charity said it had created a new programme – named FISH – for young people to help those who have self-harmed but do not have a mental health diagnosis and therefore do not qualify for specialist mental health support services such as CAMHS.

“The facts are harrowing. At least four young people in every secondary school class are now self-harming. Within the last decade we’ve seen a considerable rise in the range of mental health issues impacting young people, in part due to social media pressures and the ongoing stigma towards speaking about our mental health,” said Jag Basra, an assistant psychologist and lead on FISH.

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, the chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ child and adolescent faculty, called on NHS England to stand by its pledge to invest an additional £1bn in frontline mental health services and treat 1 million more people by 2021.

“Young people are presenting in ever greater numbers to A&E, GP referral rates have soared, and our workforce is struggling to meet this demand,” she said. “Our young people urgently need access to timely specialist treatment as well as investment in early intervention and prevention [...] This is a matter of life and death.”

The figures were “alarming”, said Tom Madders, campaigns director at YoungMinds. “We know from calls to our parents’ helpline that far too many young people with mental health problems do not get the help they need, and that too often the right support is not available until they reach crisis point,” he said.

“That’s why the government must ensure that CAMHS funding reflects the true scale of the need, and that money is not siphoned off to other priorities.”

Barbara Keeley MP, the shadow minister for social care and mental health, said the “continual increase” in A&E admissions for under-18s due to self-harm was concerning.

“Children and young people’s mental health services will be plunged into further crisis by an inadequate Tory budget which ignored mental health entirely,” she said.

“The lack of access to services for two-thirds of children is a damning reminder of the Tories’ failure to match their warm words about mental health with action.”

Two-thirds of children referred for mental healthcare in England not treated

Sixty per cent of children and young people referred for specialist care by their GP are not receiving treatment, figures reveal.

Data from 32 NHS Trusts in England showed about 60% of under-18s who are referred to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) by their GP are not receiving treatment, according to figures obtained by Spurgeons children’s charity.

The number of under-18s admitted to A&E for self-harm has increased by 50% in five years but outpatient treatment rates are falling, according to the charity. Self-harm admissions to A&E departments for young people have increased for the seventh year running according to figures from 59 A&E departments in England.

The sharp increase in the number of under-18s being admitted to hospital after poisoning, cutting or hanging themselves is more marked among girls, though an increase has also been seen among boys. About 77% of A&E or hospital admissions for self-harm were made by girls from 2010 to 2016.

The news comes after it emerged that children with anxiety and depression will be guaranteed treatment within four weeks in a effort to improve mental healthcare, but the lack of NHS staff and funding means the plan cannot be fully introduced until 2021.

In a bid to ease pressure on the system, Spurgeons children’s charity said it had created a new programme – named FISH – for young people to help those who have self-harmed but do not have a mental health diagnosis and therefore do not qualify for specialist mental health support services such as CAMHS.

“The facts are harrowing. At least four young people in every secondary school class are now self-harming. Within the last decade we’ve seen a considerable rise in the range of mental health issues impacting young people, in part due to social media pressures and the ongoing stigma towards speaking about our mental health,” said Jag Basra, an assistant psychologist and lead on FISH.

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, the chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ child and adolescent faculty, called on NHS England to stand by its pledge to invest an additional £1bn in frontline mental health services and treat 1 million more people by 2021.

“Young people are presenting in ever greater numbers to A&E, GP referral rates have soared, and our workforce is struggling to meet this demand,” she said. “Our young people urgently need access to timely specialist treatment as well as investment in early intervention and prevention [...] This is a matter of life and death.”

The figures were “alarming”, said Tom Madders, campaigns director at YoungMinds. “We know from calls to our parents’ helpline that far too many young people with mental health problems do not get the help they need, and that too often the right support is not available until they reach crisis point,” he said.

“That’s why the government must ensure that CAMHS funding reflects the true scale of the need, and that money is not siphoned off to other priorities.”

Barbara Keeley MP, the shadow minister for social care and mental health, said the “continual increase” in A&E admissions for under-18s due to self-harm was concerning.

“Children and young people’s mental health services will be plunged into further crisis by an inadequate Tory budget which ignored mental health entirely,” she said.

“The lack of access to services for two-thirds of children is a damning reminder of the Tories’ failure to match their warm words about mental health with action.”